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X-Motor Racing

Dec 15, 2008
896
65
Let me introduce myself.
My name is Eugene and I’m a developer of X-Motor Racing.
I hope this forum wills be useful place of contact.
 
Dec 15, 2008
896
65
Thank you guys!
A new version will be available soon with an improved tire model.
You will be able to edit in game (without VehiclePhysics utility) certain aspects such as steering system, camber/toe angles, brakes balance, suspension, tire grip etc.
 

Dave Stephenson

RaceDepartment Technical Administrator
Staff member
Premium
Sep 4, 2007
9,994
1,595
I have a question which is a variation of one abovce but has been perplexing me since i tried this this morning.

Q. I am thinking of buying this game, but I really need to see how good the physics are, how can I make a judgement on this when the demo does not include the full physics setting?
 
Oct 21, 2008
256
0
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I have a question which is a variation of one abovce but has been perplexing me since i tried this this morning.

Q. I am thinking of buying this game, but I really need to see how good the physics are, how can I make a judgement on this when the demo does not include the full physics setting?
I downloaded this myself and i was thinking the exact same thing.
 
Dec 15, 2008
896
65
Next demo version will be available with simple physics customization ability (suspension, steering system, brakes balance, grip). But full physics customization like the tire model, aerodynamics, transmission etc are available in full version only. We distribute XMR as shareware and so it should be limited by functionality.
 
V

vmagics

Sorry for my ignorance if you've already answered this but will I be able to run this next demo without assists?
 
Dec 15, 2008
896
65
You are able turn them off.
Current version has an ABS only.
I’m going to implement other driver assistances in next versions.
 
V

vmagics

You are able turn them off.
Current version has an ABS only.
I’m going to implement other driver assistances in next versions.
I beg your pardon, I thought the demo was running in an arcade/sim mode. My ability to overlook things is growing more and more problematic as I grow older. Thanks
 
Dec 15, 2008
896
65
I beg your pardon, I thought the demo was running in an arcade/sim mode. My ability to overlook things is growing more and more problematic as I grow older. Thanks
Traction control and Stability control are implemented.
They really help remain in control when you skid.
Thank you for the hints.
 

Bram Hengeveld

RaceDepartment Founder
Staff member
Premium
Dec 26, 2006
46,000
19,464
X-Motoring Racing Blog click here over the upcoming 1.12 update speaks about adding the McGill Formula car.

Have been reading about the cars and quote from the McGill Formula Hybrid website

For 2009, we are designing and building an all new car from the ground up. All photos are of the 2007-2008 car.
See the old car in action on Discovery Channel's Mean Green Machines Here

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Hybrid is harder

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The complexities of a hybrid car far exceed those of a typical gasoline powered car. This is because of the electric component of the car. By nature, a certain mass of batteries contains less energy than an equal amount of gasoline. This causes the car to be much heavier than it’s gasoline counterpart. [/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Series Hybrid:[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Many types of hybrid cars exist. The McGill Formula hybrid is a series type. Unlike some hybrid cars that can run on gas or electric power, the McGill car drives exclusively on electricity. The sole purpose of the gas engine is to recharge the batteries or to provide electricity for the motors, it is not mechanically linked to the wheels.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]This means that the car can drive even when the engine is not running. The engine is essentially a range extending device. [/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]More about hybrids: [/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_electric_vehicle[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Independant rear wheel drive?[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]An electric motor powers each of the rear wheels of the McGill hybrid car. This was implemented for several reasons. It allows the elimination of a single bulky (and heavy) motor in favour of two smaller, lighter motors. The only downside is that it necessitates 2 transmissions. Conversely, it can accomplish the same task as a common differential by transmitting more power or speed to the outside wheel when the car is turning. This improves handling.[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What is a CVT?[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]CVT stands for continuously variable transmission. You may have heard the term in car commercials as it is being increasingly implemented more often in passenger vehicles. The transmission is continuously variable because there are no set gear ratios like a manual or automatic transmission. It is an infinitely variable ratio between two set points. As a result there is no shifting and the transfer of power from the engine (or motor) to the road is seamless and smooth. There are many different types of CVTs. What they all have in common is that they allow an engine to run at peak efficiency all the time, wheel speed is varied only by the changing of the gear ratios. The transmission can be tweaked to let the engine run at it’s most economical fuel wise or it’s most powerful. CVT operated vehicles have the odd and distinct characteristic of not changing engine note as they accelerate. This sometimes relays the idea of low power, but it is not so.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The type of CVT in the Formula hybrid car is of V belt type. Basically, a V belt runs inside two conical plates. As the plates come together, the belt rises and in effect runs on a larger pulley. The reverse is true when the plates separate. Two of the pulley plate assemblies work in unison to take up belt slack. The mechanism that changes the positions of the plates works using centrifugal forces acting upon weights and springs. These weights and springs can be interchanged to dictate the behaviour of the transmission. The CVTs found in the McGill car are similar to the ones that you would find in a snowmobile. [/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]CVTs are not slow, they were banned Formula One because they made the cars too fast.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]More about CVTs: [/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]http://auto.howstuffworks.com/cvt2.htm[/FONT]



[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Batteries:[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The type of batteries used in the car are lithium ion type. This is the same type found in most modern laptops and cell phones. Batteries are constantly improving in terms of energy storing capabilities and lighter weight. Lithium ion are the best compromise of weight, energy storing and price at the moment.[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Why doesn’t it have Formula One style wings?[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The events of the Formula Hybrid competition do not take place at very high speeds (below 80km/h). Due to these low speeds, the amount of air traveling over the car is not great enough to take advantage of the downforce created by inverted wings. Even F1 cars do not benefit greatly from their wings at speeds below 120km/h. And at speeds below that, wings are a disadvantage as they create drag and add weight. But they do look cool.[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Why not regenerative braking?[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Tests were conducted by the students working on the car to see if regenerative braking was worth implementing. Initial findings were negative as a more effective regeneration would have to be performed on the front wheels. As they do not have generators on them, they would have to be fitted with something to this end. This would render the car heavier and more complex. It would be possible to implement it on the rear wheels without any modifications to the equipment, but the problem would then come down to complex computing and electronics. This is not out of the question, but it is not seen as a high enough priority for the energy regained.[/FONT]
[/FONT]
This sounds like superclose-entire-field-within-a-second-racing. Top stuff for RD in the future:clap:
 

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