EU GT3 @ Red Bull Ring - Sunday 21st February 2021

demetri

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621
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Colorado, US
I think chris haye has a pretty good series on setups in general. You can watch it here https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLWSWQyqnLDu7tLWE9P35Qog6Z8_xb7l_g
Watched the last one. One mistake he made was assuming that those "clicks" in setup are meaningful and you can use them to compare different settings. You can't. When he was tuning fast dampers, he noticed that default settings were about the same for bump and rebound. Well, that's not true. Fast Front Bump set to 6 actually means 6200 (Ns/m), while Fast Front Rebound set to 5 means 9199. Similar thing for the rears - defaults are 6200 and 7000 respectively.
I'm also not sure that setting fast bump higher than fast rebound makes sense for controlling race car behavior on curbs/road bumps. I think this would make it more comfortable for the driver, but our goal is to maximize tire contact with the surface, so we probably need the opposite. See, when you hit a bump at high speed and your suspension is compressing you want to stop this compression right when it compresses just enough to clear the bump, which calls for higher bump damping (but set it too high and you turn your suspension into basically steel rods, so there should be some balance here). When you have passed the bump and the spring is extending and returning the wheel back to the ground you don't want to slow that process down by rebound set too high. I'm not sure I am correct, but that's my thinking about the subject.
 

neesve

Neesve
Premium
Watched the last one. One mistake he made was assuming that those "clicks" in setup are meaningful and you can use them to compare different settings. You can't. When he was tuning fast dampers, he noticed that default settings were about the same for bump and rebound. Well, that's not true. Fast Front Bump set to 6 actually means 6200 (Ns/m), while Fast Front Rebound set to 5 means 9199. Similar thing for the rears - defaults are 6200 and 7000 respectively.
I'm also not sure that setting fast bump higher than fast rebound makes sense for controlling race car behavior on curbs/road bumps. I think this would make it more comfortable for the driver, but our goal is to maximize tire contact with the surface, so we probably need the opposite. See, when you hit a bump at high speed and your suspension is compressing you want to stop this compression right when it compresses just enough to clear the bump, which calls for higher bump damping (but set it too high and you turn your suspension into basically steel rods, so there should be some balance here). When you have passed the bump and the spring is extending and returning the wheel back to the ground you don't want to slow that process down by rebound set too high. I'm not sure I am correct, but that's my thinking about the subject.
Well you clearly know more about setups than me, so can't argue on that. I found the way he explaned how everything physicaly works helpfull, but i can't give substantiated mening as far as the actual setup goes!
 

demetri

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621
778
Colorado, US
Well you clearly know more about setups than me, so can't argue on that. I found the way he explaned how everything physicaly works helpfull, but i can't give substantiated mening as far as the actual setup goes!
I sort of understand how most of those settings work in theory, but applying that knowledge to the actual task of setting up a car for a given track is a different thing. If a setup I start with is completely broken (and some of the default setups in AC could very much be that way) I usually have no clue about what to fix first. Also, different cars may have different quirks that you can either fix with setup (but that may also make the car slower) or you can work around that by altering your driving. Go figure what would be the best (fastest around the track) way. So, I'm not a setup guru by any stretch of imagination, I usually need to have a decent baseline setup (e.g. tuned for a different track) to begin with.
 
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