RD Series on Simracing.GP

Daily WTCR races on Simracing.GP Weekly GT3 Endurance races on Simracing.GP Weekly GT3 Sprint Races on Simracing.GP Weekly GT4 Sprint Races on Simracing.GP

RaceRoom | Exciting Things In Latest Developer Notes Post

Sector3 Studios have dropped a rather tasty posting on their RaceRoom forum - detailing many of the very interesting plans in store for the simulation in the months ahead...
  • New TCR car in the works.
  • Improved and overhauled Force Feedback system coming soon.
  • Sparks and particles being worked on.
Pretty exciting words from the world of Sector3 Studios in recent days, the Swedish development team having dropped a surprise 'Developer Notes' post about some of the things that are happening behind the scenes - with plenty of work apparently under way on both features, graphics and content in the not too distant future of the title.

In terms of probably the hottest topic from the May Dev Notes post, RaceRoom Producer J-F Chardon has informed the sim racing world that RaceRoom is set to enjoy a whole new Force Feedback system - bringing the simulation feedback up to par with the latest physics improvements, and hopefully improving the driving experience for the many players of the title.

Old FFB:
  1. Steering geometry of the car is ignored, resulting in little differences in FFB between cars. It results in the steering torques being wrong, as they depend only on tyre forces rather than the actual characteristics of the car
  2. Lack of longitudinal tyre forces
  3. Lack of gyroscopic forces from the tyres
  4. The tyre forces from physics are badly translated into FFB torque
  5. Tyre contact patch movement is ignored, no dynamic change while driving
  6. Too many sliders in the FFB options menu, some of them making promises the FFB could not deliver
New FFB:
  1. Steering geometry is used: much more uniqueness between cars, the resulting steering torques have real meaning
  2. All tyre forces are taken into account
  3. Gyroscopic effects of tyres taken into account
  4. 100% Physics-based calculations
  5. Tyre contact patch movement is used: much more dynamic feel while driving
  6. Only crucial settings to adjust the FFB to the various steering wheels
Other highlights from the dev notes post include details about replay interface improvements and new UI options - plus sparks and dust particles are coming to the title... at some point in the future anyway...

All pretty exciting stuff indeed... check out the dev notes for the full details of what Sector3 have in store.
About author
Paul Jeffrey
RaceDepartment Editor-in-Chief, occasional YouTuber, commentator and broadcaster, with a passion for motorsport on both the real and virtual racetrack.

Comments

RF2 destroyer? It's gonna happen at some point.
If RR at least had 24 hours cycle that would be a start but for now it's too simple and old engine to make people move from rF2. BTW I feel like driving in GTR2 in RR, what is not a totally bad thing but by other hand shows the age of the tyre and physics model.
 
The unrealistic flashing AI headlights for no reason drive me nuts. Add an option to turn that off, and I might try this game again.
 
What do you mean? Raceroom can run on a literal potato.
My "potato" can run ACC with all settings on EPIC (except mirrors) at a constant 80-90 FPS and AMS2 also with everything maxed out at a constant 120+ FPS.

With Raceroom I usually have high FPS, but I also have occasional stutters and frame dips sometimes into the 40 or 30FPS (but feels like 2 or 3 FPS). This never happened before the update when they implemented time of day progression, and lowering my visual settings doesn't seem to do anything.

From the stuff I've read about this it seems like people with older PC's might actually have less (or no) issues with Raceroom than those with higher-end machines.
 
Last edited:
Interesting reading on the new ffb. It reveals there's a move to less ffb tuning options, less reliance on a car's ffb design to determine feel, and more reliance on the actual physics of the car to determine how ffb feels.

I like it.

One example with old school SimBin titles is devs and modders often artificially increase ffb strength with a multiplier up or down based on if the car is small and light vs big and heavy. I've always thought this was wrong. Steering weightiness should be based on the physics of the steering column, suspension, wheels, and car measures and physics, etc. So, I think they're headed in the right direction here.

Seems like the general trend across sims is to simplify in-game ffb settings and get the simulation of steering forces right.

Thumbs up.
 
Last edited:
Since, as I understand it, R3E is still an empirical tyre model, it may be able to approach ACC, but rF2/AMS2 level ffb, being physical tyre models, will likely prove unreachable.
 
@David Peres. You said you have a decent Ryzen processor. Which one do you have? Single thread performance means a lot with RaceRoom.
I have a Ryzen 5 3600. Single thread performance being very important in Raceroom might be an issue for more modern processors, which usually go for more cores/threads.
 
I have a Ryzen 5 3600. Single thread performance being very important in Raceroom might be an issue for more modern processors, which usually go for more cores/threads.
The 3600 should be good. It's what I got and the game doesn't drop frames. BUT...

I am running a GTX 1070, and my monitor is only 1920x1080 @ 75hz. So I may not be the best source on this. Especially if you need someone who is running VR or something. My potato can't handle 3 1080p screens, let alone VR and 90fps minimal.

I can say that the Ryzen 5 3600 allows me to run the Nordschleife in RaceRoom with time of day enabled. As long as I don't get aggressive with the time scale, I get 75fps. The minute I go over X10 with the time scale, then my FPS drops.

As for stutters. I can't recall the last time I had an issue.
 
Really? Not for me, constantly skipping frames even with everything set to low. I might not have the most up to date computer, but it's no slouch. I have a 2070S and a decent Ryzen CPU. I think it performs worse than ACC in VR for me.
You may want to check your setting. I have a really powerful Ryzen and 64GB of RAM, but I have a 5 yo GTX3700 video card that barely works, yet R3R runs pretty well for me. Unless you put that 2070 on the cheapest Ryzen ever sold, I am betting something is not configured right.
 
Really? Not for me, constantly skipping frames even with everything set to low. I might not have the most up to date computer, but it's no slouch. I have a 2070S and a decent Ryzen CPU. I think it performs worse than ACC in VR for me.
This doesn't seem normal. R3E should run smoothly with such a setup, even in VR. Did you enable the time progression? This feature can be heavy on the framerate sometimes, as others mentioned above ;)
 
Last edited:
Really? Not for me, constantly skipping frames even with everything set to low. I might not have the most up to date computer, but it's no slouch. I have a 2070S and a decent Ryzen CPU. I think it performs worse than ACC in VR for me.

My "potato" can run ACC with all settings on EPIC (except mirrors) at a constant 80-90 FPS and AMS2 also with everything maxed out at a constant 120+ FPS.

With Raceroom I usually have high FPS, but I also have occasional stutters and frame dips sometimes into the 40 or 30FPS (but feels like 2 or 3 FPS). This never happened before the update when they implemented time of day progression, and lowering my visual settings doesn't seem to do anything.

From the stuff I've read about this it seems like people with older PC's might actually have less (or no) issues with Raceroom than those with higher-end machines.

I can confirm, with a Ryzen 5 2600 and RX 5700 XT, 1-2 threads on the CPU are working hard, GPU is almost idle and I get huge dips with a normal sized grid of 24 cars. Especially bad with tracks in tight corners, like starting a race at Silverstone. When AI cars are out of sight FPS jumps really high, way above 60, when suddenly you see all cars, it tanks to low 40s. So on my system R3E runs the worst by far, even the "demanding" ACC is set up to run smooth, and I am even supersampling there. In R3E I literally tried setting up the graphics turning every setting up and testing after each change, it just gets progressively worse. If you want constant high frame rate you need really potato graphics and that I cannot accept. Even tried disabling multithreading, etc.

Dear Sector 3, I used to play R3E a lot, in fact it is still my second most played sim on Steam, soon to be overtaken by ACC, but a couple of years ago performance got really worse and thus I can't continue to support this sim. Here and there I try it if it got better. It's very frustrating that this issue is fully ignored. I really hope it will be improved...
 
Really? Not for me, constantly skipping frames even with everything set to low. I might not have the most up to date computer, but it's no slouch. I have a 2070S and a decent Ryzen CPU. I think it performs worse than ACC in VR for me.

Look, Raceroom is not resource intensive. If you're getting WORSE performance than ACC in VR with comparable settings, you have something going on with your system.
 
This doesn't seem normal. R3E should run smoothly with such a setup, even in VR. Did you enable the time progression? This feature can be heavy on the framerate sometimes, as others mentioned above ;)
Have you guys actually tried such a setup? I did numerous clean installs, even on clean Windows. Time progression on or off, with lots of cars in sight performance is terrible, dips to low 40s, high 30s at worst, stutter. Been having this issue for years at 1080p, performance started to get worse on my last PC progressively (i5 4460 + GTX 1060) years ago, new PC since 2019 same thing (R5 2600 + GTX 1060, later R5 2600 + RX 5700 XT). All other sims/games on the PC run smooth.
 

Article information

Author
Paul Jeffrey
Views
23,565
Comments
172
Last update

Share this article

Top