2022 Formula One Canadian Grand Prix

Who will win the Canadian Grand Prix


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For the first time since 2019, Formula 1 is back in action in Canada with a dominant Red Bull team seeking their 6th consecutive win.

After two years of Montreal enforcing COVID safety protocols that resulted in cancellations, F1 is back on track at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, site of the 2022 Canadian Grand Prix.

This is the ninth race of the season, and already Red Bull is looking untouchable. A hot start to the season by Ferrari and Charles LeClerc has cooled significantly, and the blue team is now holding a commanding lead in the constructors championship.

Red Bull’s Max Verstappen, F1’s reigning driver’s champion, is also looking in peak form, and has established a comfortable lead from LeClerc after both Ferrari cars failed to finish the race in Azerbaijan.

This weekend in Montreal could see some exciting driving thanks to mixed weather conditions. At the time of this writing, Saturday’s qualifying session is forecast to be in the wet, with conditions clearing before Sunday’s race.

Canada has hosted some exciting racing over the years, and fans of teams like Ferrari, Mercedes and McLaren will be hoping for their respective favourite teams to produce some excitement by challenging Red Bull.

Are you looking forward to this race? Is this going to be yet another race win for Red Bull? Let us know your thoughts on the 2022 Canadian GP in the comments below or on Twitter @RaceDepartment
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About author
Mike Smith
I have been obsessed with sim racing and racing games since the 1980's. My first taste of live auto racing was in 1988, and I couldn't get enough ever since. Lead writer for RaceDepartment, and owner of SimRacing604 and its YouTube channel. Favourite sims include Assetto Corsa Competizione, Assetto Corsa, rFactor 2, Automobilista 2, DiRT Rally 2 - On Twitter as @simracing604

Comments

Kidding aside, I really hope for rain, (and you should, I guess), but I read an article that's been published 7 minutes ago:

"On Sunday, There is almost no chance of rain and the circuit could be relatively dry".
 
The GP is back in my city for the first time since 2019! Usually, this is the unofficial start of summer for me. :)

There was torrential rain last afternoon. Had it happened on race day, the race would have been red flagged like in 2011. There’s a chance qualifying will be in the rain, but race day will probably be sunny.
 
Slapped
Premium
Changing rules mid season to please Mercedes what a joke. MaFIA. Mercedes allready make adjustments to the floor.
Actually the way I understand it is that Mercedes will likely suffer from the rule change.

If my reading has been correct then the following will happen

1. There will be extra scrutiny on the skids and plank for excessive wear - these are the bits that hit the ground under high downforce.

2. The vertical acceleration (up and down G-force) will be analysed and if found to be in excess of a value yet to be determined then the team will be required to address the problem to bring the vertical acceleration under control.

No absolute proof on this last one as I've only heard it, but...

3. If the porpoising cannot be brought under control then the FIA can require that the team raise the ride height of the car.

So all of this seems to be at Mercedes disadvantage, but very much to the drivers health advantage.

Lewis isn't a whippersnapper anymore but at 37 he's way fitter than most in their early 20's, and if he has to walk away from a car like a 90 year old after a race then something is very wrong.
 
Actually the way I understand it is that Mercedes will likely suffer from the rule change.

If my reading has been correct then the following will happen

1. There will be extra scrutiny on the skids and plank for excessive wear - these are the bits that hit the ground under high downforce.

2. The vertical acceleration (up and down G-force) will be analysed and if found to be in excess of a value yet to be determined then the team will be required to address the problem to bring the vertical acceleration under control.

No absolute proof on this last one as I've only heard it, but...

3. If the porpoising cannot be brought under control then the FIA can require that the team raise the ride height of the car.

So all of this seems to be at Mercedes disadvantage, but very much to the drivers health advantage.

Lewis isn't a whippersnapper anymore but at 37 he's way fitter than most in their early 20's, and if he has to walk away from a car like a 90 year old after a race then something is very wrong.

Then only raise the ride height. There is no need to let the teams make adjustments to the floor.
 
There was a reason Williams/Patrick Head came up the Active Suspension concept during the Ground Effect years. (first employed, that I know of, by Chaparral in 1970 with the Can-Am 2J sucker car.)
 
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About reliability:

1 of F1’s main reasons to exist is to push the envelope of technologies that are needed to trickle down to everyday cars.
Example: FIA forces manufacturers to target minimum emissions in their engines.

In my opinion, reliability is not only shamefully low in today’s everyday cars, but also it seems to be going in the wrong direction. How is it ok in 2022 to suffer from reliability issues in a 2020 Mercedes S more than a 1990 Toyota Corolla? Both you and I know that makers have the knowledge and power to develop car parts that can endure much more than this.

Bottomline, it makes a lot of sense for the FIA to put manufacturers under the strain of making reliable new technologies. FIA penalizes changing 3 engines and power units in a season iirc, but in my opinion they should keep making the maximum limit less and less, (the opposite to the popular talk today). Why not for example force one set of tires for a whole season and allow more tire makers to compete, the most reliable team wins.

I know some will say this will reduce action and lessen the importance of the role of the drivers skill, but I mean, F1 in my opinion isn’t the best place to see race craft anyway. If you want to see tens of crazy overtakes, check motorbikes races,and if you want to see skill, check rally onboards….etc. F1 teams are a little boring anyway, why not use them to help us improve cars dependability. They might be frustrated due to the DNF penalty today, but you won’t be frustrated due to being stranded on the highway tomorrow.
 
About reliability:

1 of F1’s main reasons to exist is to push the envelope of technologies that are needed to trickle down to everyday cars.
Example: FIA forces manufacturers to target minimum emissions in their engines.

In my opinion, reliability is not only shamefully low in today’s everyday cars, but also it seems to be going in the wrong direction. How is it ok in 2022 to suffer from reliability issues in a 2020 Mercedes S more than a 1990 Toyota Corolla? Both you and I know that makers have the knowledge and power to develop car parts that can endure much more than this.

Bottomline, it makes a lot of sense for the FIA to put manufacturers under the strain of making reliable new technologies. FIA penalizes changing 3 engines and power units in a season iirc, but in my opinion they should keep making the maximum limit less and less, (the opposite to the popular talk today). Why not for example force one set of tires for a whole season and allow more tire makers to compete, the most reliable team wins.

I know some will say this will reduce action and lessen the importance of the role of the drivers skill, but I mean, F1 in my opinion isn’t the best place to see race craft anyway. If you want to see tens of crazy overtakes, check motorbikes races,and if you want to see skill, check rally onboards….etc. F1 teams are a little boring anyway, why not use them to help us improve cars dependability. They might be frustrated due to the DNF penalty today, but you won’t be frustrated due to being stranded on the highway tomorrow.
Reliability in road cars these days has to obey to two words:

Planned obsolescence.


Car makers have no interest in selling you a car that will last forever. It eats their margins, it means they wont be able to sell you a new one so soon, and it means they will sell less replacement parts too in the short run.

Now i actually agree with you in the tire example for F1. Its ridiculous that we keep getting this "green push" all the time, with less fuel used, less engines, etc, and still, they keep going through tires like Homer Simpson goes through donuts. It would also reduce grip, which can only be a good thing.
 
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Slapped
Premium
Checked off a bucket list item today and finally made my first GP. That Ferrari is visibly faster than anything else on the straight after turn 34. Pretty mind boggling to see.
Nice one, mate - hope you thoroughly enjoy it. That certainly beats my only motorsport event which was banger racing at Great Yarmouth Stadium (basically Wreckfest in real life)
 
Nitro McClean
Premium
About reliability:

1 of F1’s main reasons to exist is to push the envelope of technologies that are needed to trickle down to everyday cars.
Example: FIA forces manufacturers to target minimum emissions in their engines.

In my opinion, reliability is not only shamefully low in today’s everyday cars, but also it seems to be going in the wrong direction. How is it ok in 2022 to suffer from reliability issues in a 2020 Mercedes S more than a 1990 Toyota Corolla? Both you and I know that makers have the knowledge and power to develop car parts that can endure much more than this.

Bottomline, it makes a lot of sense for the FIA to put manufacturers under the strain of making reliable new technologies. FIA penalizes changing 3 engines and power units in a season iirc, but in my opinion they should keep making the maximum limit less and less, (the opposite to the popular talk today). Why not for example force one set of tires for a whole season and allow more tire makers to compete, the most reliable team wins.

I know some will say this will reduce action and lessen the importance of the role of the drivers skill, but I mean, F1 in my opinion isn’t the best place to see race craft anyway. If you want to see tens of crazy overtakes, check motorbikes races,and if you want to see skill, check rally onboards….etc. F1 teams are a little boring anyway, why not use them to help us improve cars dependability. They might be frustrated due to the DNF penalty today, but you won’t be frustrated due to being stranded on the highway tomorrow.
I don't understand you. When I talk with other people, I only hear everyday cars are very reliable these days. I must admit, I drive a Toyota for reliability, but if I have to believe the people around me there are no more unreliable cars. So I don't now how you get the idea that "reliability is not only shamefully low in today’s everyday cars, but also it seems to be going in the wrong direction."

The FIA has already done a lot with the rules. In the 80's teams could use an engine for every session if they could spend the money. That was a completely different story compared to 3 engines for more than 20 races. Teams had a spare car if something went wrong during practice or qualification. Spare cars are no longer allowed.
 
Let it rain! the 2011 race was awesome, took only 4 hours lol


Button mocking Vettel for always sticking 2 fingers out when he won a race
 

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Love how Russel complains it's hard to make a change due to politics. Proceeding to spout politics, explaining we already have a (active suspension) solution, which just so happens to be the best option for Merc's car design...... =P
 
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