Would You Rather...

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Poland
Don't see much fun in E-sports drivers, they don't play to have fun. they play to exploit the game physics and win. I'm a sim racer who wants to race anybody at my level no matter what position.
i agree 100% i saw one ex-esport driver comment on youtube video he told its no fun, them managers pushing them to win and setups they use makes car act like its arcade game, that real car would break after 2 laps in real life, but they by setups found exploit to sim physics setting up car so unrealistic its more like mario kart driving then, and wins he who has better more arcadeish setup
 
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Poland
im simracer too who goals to have most realistic experience out of sim, i even bought DD wheel to have that experience no matter i read opinions even DD wheel may make your lap times worse, as more realistic experience may not equals to better lap times
but in my case i improved, maybe thats cause i drive daily so much in real cars, and with belt driven wheel i always felt like somethings wrong, like my wheel is a toy not real wheel, so i was more scared to drive belt driven wheel than my current DD or real cars
 
E-sports driver. Only thing I have driven in real life is a bycicle, and a full salary would allow me to just focus on getting faster every day with no risks and real life consequences.
 
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Serious question here - how many of you in the "real life - it's a no-brainer" camp have ever actually been on track? Have you experienced a hot cockpit with an engine constantly vibrating your guts? Have you experienced the lurching in your stomach as the car accelerates, decelerates, and turns?

Before I got on track with someone I thought, "Oh, this is going to be awesome!" By the time it was over, I was ready to be stationary for a while. Now I also realize that motion-sickness is very different when you are in control of the vehicle, but it was still a real thing for me.

On the other hand, karting doesn't bother me at all and I thoroughly enjoy it. But that is also relatively low-risk in terms of cost or personal injury. I also enjoy driving my Miata on mountain roads when I have the chance. So maybe it was just not being the driver.

But either way, there is a lot more risk on track. I'd be worried about damaging someone else's car or my own. And I'd be worried about hurting myself and others. I really don't understand how someone can have a massive shunt and then approach the same corner with just as much aggressiveness. But perhaps this is just further proof that I am not cut out for this IRL.

You had a bad experience conditioning what You would do if a chance presented itself as a byproduct of being thrown in a car as a passenger at racing speeds with no adaptation period at all. But Your fear comes from a logical falacy, it isn't the same driving the car yourself than being reduced to just being a mass of meat strapped to a seat with no influence at all in Your own destiny.

I'm unable to ride in a rollecoaster or in a bike as a passenger, not even as a passenger of Valentino Rossi himself. My unconscious can't trust in a situation in where I'm not in control at all, and still, I can enjoy a trackday riding by myself in the same bike because I'm the one that chooses what amount of risk/speed I'm willing to take. In a race car the same applies, You are the person that chooses at what speed You are comfortable/safe, and for that reason You would feel safe, because You know that You are not going to try anything stupidly risky.
 

metalnwood

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I chose option two but on reflection.. I get one year and then can never do it again...

It may be like a genie giving you 1 minute of true happiness that you will never have again... might be better not knowing if you can never have it again!
 

Badwheels

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It's interesting to me that so many here are either thrill-seekers or are confident that they are.

I bet I have lower life insurance premiums :)
I don't consider myself a "thrill seeker". I consider myself someone who will do things that interest me within reason. I test myself. Part of being an athlete. There has been things I was reluctant to do, mainly because I know my limitations from testing. Would I climb Everest ? No. Why? Because the thought of losing fingers and toes doesn't excite me and I hate cold weather.

Oh, and your insurance is not less than mine. One, they never ask on the policy, " what kind of dumb **** do you normally do " and two, I don't have insurance. No one is getting rich off of me. Never happen.
 
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I am e-sporting every day. Using my phone, playing games on pc and my ps3. My triathlon traing is nothing conpared my very active gameplay...ehm...e-sports
 

TedBrosby-

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Last week during a Porsche Cup race, I butt kissed a guy who went inside his apex in front of me when I was trying to pass him inside. I proceeded to punt him off the road in a way that sent him to a shadow realm similar to the place from Interstellar where Matthew McConaughey was pushing those books out of the bookshelves. I felt so bad for it and I'm sure the most he suffered was his wheel spinning a little weird for a few seconds and having to press a button to go to the virtual pit stop.

In real life, I'd have killed that dude.

I'll take paid esports driver and avoid the 10 year alcohol addiction to cope with my murdering Death Proof themed race career.
 
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Brazil
Would I rather spend one year risking a heart attack after dealing with buggy and unfinished software while sitting in a chair at home with a toy wheel in my hands with no emotion whatsoever and having unlimited fuel, tires and cars available? Or would I rather get paid to experience one of the best feelings ever: the chance of something mechanical going wrong or in the pit, really worrisome tire and fuel management, the adrenaline of trying to protect the car and actually fearing death while racing, all of this while sweating, feeling the wind entering my helmet and listening to the beautiful explosions of a real combustion engine?

Don't get me wrong, I love sim racing, but I only do it because I can't race in real life. I would never chose a "pretend race car" (see what I did there) over the real deal.
 
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Next Week....would you..

1.Spend a year playing guitar hero in your lounge

2. Spend a year touring the globe as part of a mega-famous rock n Roll stadium band
 

BertramRaven

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Is RD offering this to us? I just wondered because game theory says I should choose the option which is beneficial but less popular to have more chance of winning. ;)
There is one more thing to consider. What is more expensive, the cost of eSports kit or a full year IRL driving? If I remember rightly, it was possible to have a year of racing using a borrowed/rented Caterham for between £8k to £15k depending on team size.
 

Jason Chamberlain

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I'm unable to ride in a rollecoaster or in a bike as a passenger, not even as a passenger of Valentino Rossi himself. My unconscious can't trust in a situation in where I'm not in control at all, and still, I can enjoy a trackday riding by myself in the same bike because I'm the one that chooses what amount of risk/speed I'm willing to take. In a race car the same applies, You are the person that chooses at what speed You are comfortable/safe, and for that reason You would feel safe, because You know that You are not going to try anything stupidly risky.
I understand what you're writing, but I don't think this is it. I trusted the driver completely. I don't really have many trust issues when I ride in cars with people (I can sleep like a baby in a car). I never for a single moment felt unsafe. Once I figured out his rhythm for braking, turn-in, etc, I did a little better as my brain could anticipate what I was going to feel.

Perhaps the biggest reason why I wouldn't want a race seat is that I hate being hot. I think that was part of my problem that day too.

I got to take my own car out as part of a set of relatively slow parade laps. It's fun to be able to say that I have been on track at VIR and I can picture it when I drive it in a sim, so I have that. If I had a chance to be on track by myself I would take it. Someone at VIR has a low-powered open-wheel trainer and I might do that experience someday. But I would not want to be out there with other cars.

I trust that I wouldn't do anything risky. I don't trust other people.

I do enjoy karting, but I've only done indoor karting that is fairly slow and definitely very safe. You'd have to really try to roll one of the karts at the place I go. Shunts do happen and I hate them.

So far, nobody has convinced me that I would actually like doing IRL racing. I don't need to be convinced, but I find it interesting that so many are trying. I understand that when you enjoy something you want other people to enjoy it like you do. But I know myself and I'm pretty confident that I would not enjoy it. But I certainly do enjoy watching others do it and I enjoy pretending to do it.
 

Alex Townsend

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Kuala Lumpur
We're all different eh?
Some of us have tried some pretty crazy stuff I'm sure. Things that would scare or make others feel uneasy.
I know when I played Rugby some of my non-athletic friends couldn't understand why I would want to put myself in danger like that. What could I possibly get out of it. It's all just understanding of what makes other people tick.
I tried rally and loved it, but preferred track racing. Karting at 70mph with your bum skimming an inch or so off the floor is exhilarating for some whilst others wouldn't want to go anywhere near it.
Then again, if someone asked me to jump out of a plane I'd probably not really want to. That's a level of risk too far for me yet second nature to someone else.
 
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Serious question here - how many of you in the "real life - it's a no-brainer" camp have ever actually been on track? Have you experienced a hot cockpit with an engine constantly vibrating your guts? Have you experienced the lurching in your stomach as the car accelerates, decelerates, and turns?

Before I got on track with someone I thought, "Oh, this is going to be awesome!" By the time it was over, I was ready to be stationary for a while. Now I also realize that motion-sickness is very different when you are in control of the vehicle, but it was still a real thing for me.

On the other hand, karting doesn't bother me at all and I thoroughly enjoy it. But that is also relatively low-risk in terms of cost or personal injury. I also enjoy driving my Miata on mountain roads when I have the chance. So maybe it was just not being the driver.

But either way, there is a lot more risk on track. I'd be worried about damaging someone else's car or my own. And I'd be worried about hurting myself and others. I really don't understand how someone can have a massive shunt and then approach the same corner with just as much aggressiveness. But perhaps this is just further proof that I am not cut out for this IRL.

So as someone that has raced, oval at a grass roots level, yeah there's a ton more risk to it. But I think one being in control makes a difference and tow there's a mindset I think to racing.
Like yes when I raced I didn't want to hit another driver. But equally it never stopped me going for moves on them. Equally after crashing I've gone back out to the same track, sometimes on the same day and pushed just as hard.
I think at least for me when you're in the car in a race you're not thinking "what if", more reacting to what comes.
To me there's also a difference in mindset between a road car and a race car. Admittedly I'm not the kind that spends hours detailing my road car but on a track day I'd still be careful with it. A race car I wouldn't be in the same way because it was built to be pushed to its limit. And that means that one day I may break it. It's kind of a case of if it happens I'd deal with it but it's not something I'm thinking of in a race.

And in terms of the answer to the question being "real life - it's a no-brainer" then that's definitely me. I've been away from racing for around a decade due to a variety of factors but if I was offered a drive I'd take it in a heartbeat
 

Jason Chamberlain

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But I think one being in control makes a difference and tow there's a mindset I think to racing.
Like yes when I raced I didn't want to hit another driver. But equally it never stopped me going for moves on them. Equally after crashing I've gone back out to the same track, sometimes on the same day and pushed just as hard.
This is very much why I don't think I'd enjoy racing IRL. I don't have that mindset. I'm a big baseball fan and have coached youth baseball. Everybody will take a ball to their face at some point in their baseball careers. The ballplayers field the next ball like it never happened. Normal people flinch. And, like with racing, the ones who are tentative have the most problems.

I remember seeing Lewis Hamilton's interview on Top Gear when he described his Turn 1 shunt (I think in practice with a brake failure?). Once he knew he was going in to the wall he thought, "This is going to hurt a little bit" and then got back out as soon as he could. That was a long time ago. He has never shown any hesitation in any corner since then. That's a racer's mindset. Good for you if you have it! Another example is Brundle's horrific-looking shunt where he ran back to the paddock and got in the spare car.

I was excited as I could be before I got to go out on track. After experiencing it I realized that I just don't have the mindset/balls/etc for it.

I think that it would be a great study to give everyone who responded, "Real life - it's a no-brainer" a chance to experience it and then follow up on what they thought about it. I'm sure plenty of you would volunteer for the study.

I also assume that everyone who responded "Real life - it's not even a question!" is either in or would be happy to get into and stay in the physical shape required to race. I realize that racing MX-5s doesn't require the same fitness as F1, but you can't exactly just roll out of bed and do it well either.
 
This question reminded me of what happened with Jimmy Broadbent. Honestly pretty interesting to see, how he does in Britcar series. It will give him a lot of credibility as a sim racing content creator and authority on what is realistic and what is not... even if doesn't go well. Those new Pragas he will drive are amazing, it's faster than a GT3

I just hope he has the guts to train his physical fitness hard enough. That will be a huge factor on how well it will go. Not just in terms of physicality of driving, but being physically fit has huge effects on ability to withstand mental pressure. He has a million dollar shot most can only dream of, hope he utilizes it and doesn't go there out of shape

Honestly, while lots of people probably choose real racing in this poll.... do they have the determination to get physically fit?

For examaple Kimi Räikkönen runs 3300 meters in Cooper's test (it's a test the military in Finland uses, you run for 12 minutes and distance you traveled is measured). Räikkönen may not look buff (drivers usually aren't), but 3300 meters is elite athlete level. Also Valtteri Bottas runs 3550 meters. Most Finnish men never run 3000 meters (not even all pro athletes, depending on their sport), and average result for conscripts is 2358 m.

To put things into perspective, my childhood friend was a multiple times Finnish Champion in pole vaulting, and he represented Finland in the European Championship. He ran 2800 meters in the military. (Pole vaulters don't need endurance). Maybe he didn't give his best effort that day, but puts into perspective what 3300m or 3550m means.

Or when compared to Hockey (from a Finnish news article):

- Kaapo Kähkönen, NHL goal keeper for Minnesota Wild, 2600 meters
- Henrik Haapala, pro player in KHL (left winger), 3200 meters

Edit: Actually Räikkönen ran later 3500m it seems
 
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Jason Chamberlain

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This question reminded me of what happened with Jimmy Broadbent. Honestly pretty interesting to see, how he does in Britcar series. It will give him a lot of credibility as a sim racing content creator and authority on what is realistic and what is not... even if doesn't go well. Those new Pragas he will drive are amazing, it's faster than a GT3
Agreed. I think he's a pay driver. I hope he does better than the F1 pay driver's.
 
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