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Volkswagen 'Shocks' its Competitors

volkswagen-id-r-pikes-peak-2018-romain-dumas.jpg


Wolfsburg takes over Pikes Peak, and it does so in spectacular fashion!

Attendees at this year's Pikes Peak International Hillclimb (aka Race To The Clouds) were in for a treat as Volkswagen marked it's re-entry to the event by smashing the run record. The astonishing I.D. R, powered by two electric motors capable of 650Nm of torque, worth some 680hp total, obliterated Sebastian Loeb’s time at the hill climb venue by almost 18 seconds, lapping at 7'57''148, travelling at an average speed of 145.70 km/h (90.538 mph). Loeb was 'only' capable of 8'13''878 in the 3.2-litre twin-turbo Peugeot 208 he had used in 2013.

Volkswagen's last attempt at the event which has been running since 1916 was over 30 years ago. In 1987 VW entered a somewhat unique Golf based Group B rally car featuring two engines, each powering the wheels of one axle. Sadly Jochi Kleint was unable to take it to the finish line after suffering a suspension failure just a quarter of a mile from the finish line.

The I.D R chassis and bodywork benefit from the knowledge gained by Porsche and Audi with their Endurance Prototypes, the 919 and the R18. Lightweight, sleek, the VW single seater goes through air like a hot knife slices through butter. Electric vehicles have different cooling systems than those present on combustion engines, which means less openings and less drag. There is better weight distribution too allowed by the “green vehicle”, translating to an overall perfectly balanced car at 1100kg (2425 pounds).

The monstrous rear wing at the back, described as being “the size of a park bench”, creates more downforce than the weight of the entire car, helping to squeeze every bit of potential out of the thin mountain air. Additionally, being electric, it did not suffer from the typical power losses experienced by conventional combustion engines at the altitudes encountered at Pikes Peak (although, for the record, the turbo engine of the Peugeot did not either).

All these factors combined, made it possible for Dumas to not only beat the previous lap record held by an electric vehicle at Pikes Peak at 8'57''118 (Rhys Millen on e0 PP100, 2016), but to also become the fastest challenger ever to negotiate the 156 corners of the 12.42 mi (20 km) track.

Dumas was enthusiastic about the prototype, believing that the available torque possible on an electric vehicle is the best way to go for any hill climb or rally car. All considered, these cars might in fact be the best suited for this kind of racing, due to the relatively short nature of its stages and the various altitudes and conditions in which it is run. Could this record be something for WRC organisers, who were already considering moves towards 'green' energy at this year's meeting in Geneva, to consider?

For more news from the motorsport world be sure to check out the Motorsport Sub Forum here at RaceDepartment - Join in the discussion today!

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How this groundbreaking record makes you feel? What do you think it means for the motorsport and the car industry in general? Let us know in the comments section below!
 
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I'm sure this has nothing to do with the fact most of the top brass from VAG have resigned or are now behind bars.

Five years ago they had no interest in electric only in killing innocent people with their cheat device. Who do they think they are kidding.

Here's a idea instead of breaking a pointless record why don't you admit what you did properly, get your production vehicles to be the cleanest brands of cars out there and I don't know know maybe plant some trees or pay for some plastic to be cleaned from the ocean or something.

Jokers these boys and they obviously think we are all thick.
 
Th
View attachment 257639

Wolfsburg takes over Pikes Peak, and it does so in spectacular fashion!

Attendees at this year's Pikes Peak International Hillclimb (aka Race To The Clouds) were in for a treat as Volkswagen marked it's re-entry to the event by smashing the run record. The astonishing I.D. R, powered by two electric motors capable of 650Nm of torque, worth some 680hp total, obliterated Sebastian Loeb’s time at the hill climb venue by almost 18 seconds, lapping at 7'57''148, travelling at an average speed of 145.70 km/h (90.538 mph). Loeb was 'only' capable of 8'13''878 in the 3.2-litre twin-turbo Peugeot 208 he had used in 2013.

Volkswagen's last attempt at the event which has been running since 1916 was over 30 years ago. In 1987 VW entered a somewhat unique Golf based Group B rally car featuring two engines, each powering the wheels of one axle. Sadly Jochi Kleint was unable to take it to the finish line after suffering a suspension failure just a quarter of a mile from the finish line.

The I.D R chassis and bodywork benefit from the knowledge gained by Porsche and Audi with their Endurance Prototypes, the 919 and the R18. Lightweight, sleek, the VW single seater goes through air like a hot knife slices through butter. Electric vehicles have different cooling systems than those present on combustion engines, which means less openings and less drag. There is better weight distribution too allowed by the “green vehicle”, translating to an overall perfectly balanced car at 1100kg (2425 pounds).

The monstrous rear wing at the back, described as being “the size of a park bench”, creates more downforce than the weight of the entire car, helping to squeeze every bit of potential out of the thin mountain air. Additionally, being electric, it did not suffer from the typical power losses experienced by conventional combustion engines at the altitudes encountered at Pikes Peak (although, for the record, the turbo engine of the Peugeot did not either).

All these factors combined, made it possible for Dumas to not only beat the previous lap record held by an electric vehicle at Pikes Peak at 8'57''118 (Rhys Millen on e0 PP100, 2016), but to also become the fastest challenger ever to negotiate the 156 corners of the 12.42 mi (20 km) track.

Dumas was enthusiastic about the prototype, believing that the available torque possible on an electric vehicle is the best way to go for any hill climb or rally car. All considered, these cars might in fact be the best suited for this kind of racing, due to the relatively short nature of its stages and the various altitudes and conditions in which it is run. Could this record be something for WRC organisers, who were already considering moves towards 'green' energy at this year's meeting in Geneva, to consider?

For more news from the motorsport world be sure to check out the Motorsport Sub Forum here at RaceDepartment - Join in the discussion today!

Like what you see here at RaceDepartment? Don't forget to like, subscribe and follow us on social media!

RaceDepartment YouTube
RaceDepartment Twitter
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How this groundbreaking record makes you feel? What do you think it means for the motorsport and the car industry in general? Let us know in the comments section below!
That car looks bloody good as an LMP1 car
 
There's still a ways to go in terms of battery life, but with this run electric power has proven itself to be more than fast enough, especially in short bursts. I'd like to think that this will end the anti-electric backlash that World Rallycross is presently receiving, but it probably won't because 'noise'.

And in my opinion, it's a real shame that fans can be so turned off by the noise, when the racing itself will remain as good as it's always been. This goes not just for World Rallycross, but any present or future series adopting hybrid or full electric tech.

Am I going to miss the fire spitting turbos? Yes. Does it truly bother me? No.
 

ghostshades

Unassisted racing specialist
Regarding combustengine sounds going to be missed; how about this:

We make the races more and more like a big party, or a funfair - you could watch the races, take a ferris wheel spin or dance. All those who watch the race get wireless headsets, or bring their own.
There are endless options to customize the sound being heard from every car, and you can sneak listen on what others hear - if you pay a microtransaction based on that users popularity! So basically, you could get paid to sit and watch a race, while the cars sing like whales, or stuka sirens or what weird custom concoction you can muster up.
Now, most races are just too damn POLISHED and STIFF to be "for the masses"
 
There's still a ways to go in terms of battery life, but with this run electric power has proven itself to be more than fast enough, especially in short bursts. I'd like to think that this will end the anti-electric backlash that World Rallycross is presently receiving, but it probably won't because 'noise'.

And in my opinion, it's a real shame that fans can be so turned off by the noise, when the racing itself will remain as good as it's always been. This goes not just for World Rallycross, but any present or future series adopting hybrid or full electric tech.

Am I going to miss the fire spitting turbos? Yes. Does it truly bother me? No.

Because for some people, me included, "sound is everything", the sound is what makes me really love a race or a car (I didn't care at all about the 911 RSR GTE, and I love it now it has a fantastic sound), it's what takes my breath away, it's what gives me shivers down my spine.
I can appreciate electric racing cars, I even like their sound, but I can't appreciate replacing some of the best souding racing cars (DTM, SGT, WRC, WRX) by electric cars, it just kills any interest for me.

Moreover, hearing the engine sound, the gear change, how the engine revs, gives a lot of feedback, allows to feel a lot more how the car behave and adds a lot to the enjoyment too.

So yes, even with electric cars, WRC onboards will still be breathtaking, but sure I'll enjoy them a lot less.

And of course, when you're near the track, the sound of all cars is a big part of the enjoyment, of the ambience. A full electric Le Mans or the incoming full electric WRX will feel a lot more bland for spectators.

Electric is not the only alternative, and seeing most series going this route because it's the current trend pisses me off.
 
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