Transducer placement for Simvibe chassis mode - advice

Grumpybeard

10RPM
Original poster
Dec 1, 2018
18
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Hi,

Have 4 buttkicker mini LFE in simvibe chassis mode directly mounted on inside corners of custom 8020 rig (very rigid using 160x40 profile).

I’m not overly happy with the feedback I get from the transducers - most effects like suspnsion surge and bumps are set around 80%, and I don’t feel so much from them. The transducers re mounted directly onto the 8020 in each inside corner, with pistons moving vertically.

Any suggestions other than increasing strength % in each effect, perhaps a diff way to mount etc?

Many thanks
 

Grumpybeard

10RPM
Original poster
Dec 1, 2018
18
1
49
Thanks Soulstoner - yep, seen those mounts but always questioned why need for additional mounting plates when the transducers can be mounted to 8020 directly. As you hint, perhaps the plates will allow better isolation. Anyone with direct experience?
 
Jul 29, 2017
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I have experience with those mounting plates. I’m not an expert, but I would say you don’t buy those plates for better isolation. You use them to mount your buttkickers cantilevered to increase the force transfered to the rig. If you mount them to the same place on the rig as before you might get a little more effect, but not in a meaningful way.

You use 160/40 aluminum extrusions. That’s heavy duty. My experience is that the more mass the buttkickers have to move the less fine details you are going to get. You might tune so you get vibrations on lower hz, but all the high hz energy will spread around and get eaten up by the rig and your tuning will be skewed. With the big LFE you probably can brute force it, but still the result would be less than optimal.

What you need is isolators to isolate the parts of your rig you want the vibrations to be in. Typically the pedal base and seat. Build those on top of a set of isolators and attach the buttkickers to the part that’s resting on the isolators. That way you contain the energy where it is needed and insure that the buttkickers is able to move the medium they are connected to. If you play guitar you’ll know the difference between a muted and un-muted string. Kind of like that.

Vibration dampening is another concept that floats around in the tactile discussion, but that serves another purpose in my mind as typical dampening materials like mats used in cars convert vibration energy into heat. This is more usefull if you for some reason have vibration “spilling over” to parts of the rig where it is not wanted or to avoid vibrations reaching your floor for example.
 
Jul 29, 2017
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Just to make clear: I just brought up the difference between isolation and dampening as the difference between these two concepts weren’t always clear to me and I’ve sometimes seen those two words get blended together. In some applications they might serve the same purpose and/or work well together. In this case I believe being aware of the differences is important so as OP buys the right equipment for his stated goals.
 

Grumpybeard

10RPM
Original poster
Dec 1, 2018
18
1
49
That’s goods advice Petro, thanks. Indeed, I think the way the buttkickers are currently mounted, in each corner of such a rigid rig, is muting the transducers, that’s how it feels to me. I think I will look at a way of directly attaching the kickers to my seat (sparco rev). Think mounting the two other kickers to my H.E. Pedal plate will be more difficult, but I’ll take a look. Appreciate the insight and advice, thanks