New here, please advise

Jwconeil85

1RPM
Original poster
May 12, 2019
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Hello,

I have spent hours racing Forza games on Xbox one x. I also race a Lexus ISF in real life.

I have decided to build a smaller rig for my condo. I’m going with the Sim Lab TR1, and a Honda prelude seat. I’d like to buy a sim racing system, and very much like the Fanatec setup. I’m going with their v3 pedals with performance pack. Ill probably buy the base Xbox wheel for now. The question I have is, is it worth upgrading from a CSW V2.5 wheel to direct drive? I’d probably buy a DD2 since the 1 is not much less money.

Will a console game even make the upgrade worth it? I have seen very little reviews for DD. Are there issues with them? Are they a solid investment?

I want to be able to start racing soon, so bugs with the wheel will cause some frustration. But if it’s worth the jump, I don’t mind spending the extra grand. Also, what wheel is needed to utilize the torque for Xbox one?

Thanks so much for the help.
 

anton_Chez

2000RPM
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Jun 1, 2016
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If you're investing in a rig and a serious wheel base, I see no reason to put off the transition to PC. That doesn't mean you can't still race on consoles with your gear (provided it's supported, some PC titles still struggle with this concept) but I'd definitely be saving for a new / upgraded build and get into the more serious simulator stuff. Your new gear will be much better suited to it and you'll find wanting to race on console much less appealing once you make the switch.

Keep in mind that if you do not currently have a build at all, or a very poor one when you factor in gaming with it, it will add a significant expense to your budget.
 

Jwconeil85

1RPM
Original poster
May 12, 2019
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Thanks for your reply. I currently don’t have anything. I’d rather buy something once then nickel and dime it over years, that’s why I’m contemplating a higher end wheel. I am hesitant to switch to PC, but it looks like the better titles are on PC.
 

Paul Glover

RaceDepartment Social Media Manager & Podcast Host
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Jul 16, 2011
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Thanks for your reply. I currently don’t have anything. I’d rather buy something once then nickel and dime it over years, that’s why I’m contemplating a higher end wheel. I am hesitant to switch to PC, but it looks like the better titles are on PC.
You'll get more variety of game on the PC, also you tend to get more sim based games. Forza etc are more sim arcade.
 

Denis Betty

The older I get, the better I was.
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Jun 18, 2013
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+ 1 for switching to PC. I think that, for most people, you'd never look back. I have a suggestion - it may not suit you, but it's an idea.
There are some great old titles, which would run ok on a modern lap top. I'm thinking GTR 2 or (if you like old cars) GT Legends. You can pick these up on Steam for buttons and they'd be worth checking out, just to give you an appreciation of some sim racing history.
That would still leave the issue of a wheel/rig. Personally, if you're at all unsure about whether to jump in to sim racing, I wouldn't go out and spend thousands on top notch controllers. My advice would be to get a used G27 or similar. They can't cost much on Ebay these days. You should get wheel, pedals and an H pattern shifter for around 100 bucks I'd guess. The components are cheap and people have problems - especially with the potentiometers in the brakes, but there are some fairly cheap fixes for that.
I would just get something like that and clamp it to a desk, to begin with. I reckon you'd be up and running for around 150 - 200 bucks and you should be able to sell the wheel, or keep it for a spare if/when you upgrade.
I hope this helps/gives you some ideas. If not, just ignore me. :D
 

anton_Chez

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Jun 1, 2016
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My journey started with a G25 to use with Dirt Rally. I just couldn't do the title justice with a pad, even though I'd sunk 100 hours or so into Dirt 3 on PC back when I switched over from console in 2011. I got the bug then. I had no intention of having or doing what I do now. At all. It was an organic thing. Funds permitted and enjoyment levels warranted the eventual upgrades.

If you know it's for you right off the bat, then dive right in. But, if you're unsure, there's nothing wrong with starting out smaller and seeing how it all goes for you. I would recommend PC regardless of your hardware, but if you do go higher end it makes even more sense to choose the PC as the platform.