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MMOS Direct drive wheel in 2020

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Hi All,
So background I've been wanting to get into direct drive for a while now and have been looking at the cheaper options like OSW kits or the Simplycity range.
Recently however I've come across some DIY options using MMOS which I believe would allow me to build a big mige based wheel for around £500, with by the looks of it the possibility to upgrade to a simucube controller later.

My question for people is would you consider an MMOS wheel to still be a decent starting direct drive option in 2020 and would it be likely to be a good upgrade over my current Thrustmaster TS-PC
 
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Like this one?

Yeah that's pretty much the construction I was looking at. A lot of the people I've seen have been coming to them from things like G27s so I just wanted to hear peoples thoughts about these DIY DD wheels vs some of the pricier belt drive options and if it would be a good step up
 

Tronicgr_6DOF

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The fact is that it is Direct drive and pure torque... servomotor instead of small DC motor of the G27... no comparison here.

But still has its limitations because of outdated firmware (MMOS firmware 2014). And you cannot use the AASD motor to upgrade to Simucube. Its working at 220v.
 

Tronicgr_6DOF

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Sounds like a old bed that creeking in that video :D

Its the electronic braking function of the servo to maintain max defined RPM (500RPM) under torque mode, to avoid runaway uncontrollable rotation, that is common for AC servos of this type (220v 3phase).
 

CC

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Its the electronic braking function of the servo to maintain max defined RPM (500RPM) under torque mode, to avoid runaway uncontrollable rotation, that is common for AC servos of this type (220v 3phase).
Yes sounds awful I couldn’t cope with that noise I doubt the wife not be best pleased either lol, so silent my DD2
 
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The fact is that it is Direct drive and pure torque... servomotor instead of small DC motor of the G27... no comparison here.

But still has its limitations because of outdated firmware (MMOS firmware 2014). And you cannot use the AASD motor to upgrade to Simucube. Its working at 220v.

So that gets into what I really want to know, is MMOS outdated to the point of not being a good option right now in 2020 vs the TS-PC I currently have or is it just that it lacks some of the newer features I'd find from Fanatec or Simucube but would still provide me with an improved overall experience over the Thrustamster

And I understand the AASD controller couldn't be used with Simucbe software. What I was meaning by upgrading to it is building a simucube control box from parts from granite devices and using that with the mige.
 

Tronicgr_6DOF

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Yes sounds awful I couldn’t cope with that noise I doubt the wife not be best pleased either lol, so silent my DD2

Yeah, you can set the max RPM to 1500RPM and won't do that noise anymore, but you better have the e-stop switch nearby or you may lose buttons from your button box on the wheel rim (if equipped)... :p

IMG_20200804_132448.jpg
 
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Tronicgr_6DOF

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So that gets into what I really want to know, is MMOS outdated to the point of not being a good option right now in 2020 vs the TS-PC I currently have or is it just that it lacks some of the newer features I'd find from Fanatec or Simucube but would still provide me with an improved overall experience over the Thrustamster

And I understand the AASD controller couldn't be used with Simucbe software. What I was meaning by upgrading to it is building a simucube control box from parts from granite devices and using that with the mige.

The Simucube is too specific as well, only certain parts are compatible, and not much to choose as alternative.
 

CC

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Here in Ukraine I see these Mige servo motors 220v like 10/12/18/20+ NM really cheap like some 10/12 like 150$ lol crazy prices, no clue how to make it work in a sim though :D
 

Tronicgr_6DOF

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Here in Ukraine I see these Mige servo motors 220v like 10/12/18/20+ NM really cheap like some 10/12 like 150$ lol crazy prices, no clue how to make it work in a sim though :D

These 220v mige won't work on Simucube, there is no 220v compatible driver
 

Tronicgr_6DOF

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Crazy these prices though these big companies are making a sweet killing on these DD units.
Fanatec/Simucube

Additional cost of low voltage drivers and power supplies... waste. These motors are designed to deliver the max torque even at 3000RPM on 220v, on low voltage 24v it cannot do more than 150RPM without torque drop.
 
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TedBrosby-

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You seem to know your stuff for sure! Very impressive :)
Well... he’s an engineer who literally makes a living by developing motion products that use Servo motors for tactile feedback. If he didn’t know how Servo motors work, I’d be very terrified to buy a 6DOF system from him. Lol.

As for your question about “eventually” upgrading to Simucube. You would need the motor to be a variant of the small/medium/large MIGE and to be honest, most of the cost of building a Simucube isn’t the Servo motor but the controller board and Servo driver.

the main reason those DIY MMOS builds work is because they flash MMOS firmware to a Discovery board and the Discovery board supplies signal to the AASD for encoder location and amperage to drive the motor. AASD basically replaces the Ioni HC of a Simucube and the Discovery board replaces the Simucube controller. But they’re limited. On one hand, they only support the supplied encoder up to around 10k PPR encoder while SC1 supports a 22 bit BiSS C encoder over 1 million PPR. On the other hand, you NEED to buy them together because a matching AASD for an empty Servo motor is next to impossible to find.
If you’re gonna do this, pick a well known motor to work with Simucube and make sure you ask them to include the AASD so you won’t be out of luck if you can’t afford to build a Simucube yet.
 

CC

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Well... he’s an engineer who literally makes a living by developing motion products that use Servo motors for tactile feedback. If he didn’t know how Servo motors work, I’d be very terrified to buy a 6DOF system from him. Lol.

As for your question about “eventually” upgrading to Simucube. You would need the motor to be a variant of the small/medium/large MIGE and to be honest, most of the cost of building a Simucube isn’t the Servo motor but the controller board and Servo driver.

the main reason those DIY MMOS builds work is because they flash MMOS firmware to a Discovery board and the Discovery board supplies signal to the AASD for encoder location and amperage to drive the motor. AASD basically replaces the Ioni HC of a Simucube and the Discovery board replaces the Simucube controller. But they’re limited. On one hand, they only support the supplied encoder up to around 10k PPR encoder while SC1 supports a 22 bit BiSS C encoder over 1 million PPR. On the other hand, you NEED to buy them together because a matching AASD for an empty Servo motor is next to impossible to find.
If you’re gonna do this, pick a well known motor to work with Simucube and make sure you ask them to include the AASD so you won’t be out of luck if you can’t afford to build a Simucube yet.
Must have been someone else’s question, I own a DD2 very happy with it currently. :)
 
Messages
31
Points
151
Well... he’s an engineer who literally makes a living by developing motion products that use Servo motors for tactile feedback. If he didn’t know how Servo motors work, I’d be very terrified to buy a 6DOF system from him. Lol.

As for your question about “eventually” upgrading to Simucube. You would need the motor to be a variant of the small/medium/large MIGE and to be honest, most of the cost of building a Simucube isn’t the Servo motor but the controller board and Servo driver.

the main reason those DIY MMOS builds work is because they flash MMOS firmware to a Discovery board and the Discovery board supplies signal to the AASD for encoder location and amperage to drive the motor. AASD basically replaces the Ioni HC of a Simucube and the Discovery board replaces the Simucube controller. But they’re limited. On one hand, they only support the supplied encoder up to around 10k PPR encoder while SC1 supports a 22 bit BiSS C encoder over 1 million PPR. On the other hand, you NEED to buy them together because a matching AASD for an empty Servo motor is next to impossible to find.
If you’re gonna do this, pick a well known motor to work with Simucube and make sure you ask them to include the AASD so you won’t be out of luck if you can’t afford to build a Simucube yet.

The question was originally form me
The motor I was looking at using was one of the mige 130st versions (the large mige) supplied with a matching AASD.
I'm aware of the encoder limitations with the MMOS solutions compared to Simucube.
I'm aware that it won't be as capable or refined as a simucube but the DIY route with MMOS is also half the price so I think the fairer comparison is to things like the Thrustmaster TS I currently own and really that's what I'm focused on because they're a comparable price.

My original point is with the limitations of a 10k PPR encoder and the older MMOS software is it going to be a better or worse solution overall than my thrustmaster for mostly playing iracing and some asseto
 
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