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For beginners, lessons from a beginner

vannib

Premium
Messages
44
Points
152
Hi All,
thought to make a post aimed at people starting out in ACC sharing my lessons as a beginner after a few tens of hours spent in game and my first semi-competitive multiplayer races.
I'm writing this in the desire of helping someone who is just starting out.
Obviously your mileage will vary based on skills, and obviously rigorously my humble opinion.

Sorry for the long post, this is just for people starting out. Don't bother if you're not a beginner, there will be no value for you here.

1) Understand that ACC is a simulation, not a "game": if your objective is just to turn on a game, ride and and be competitive, this is not for you. This said, if you put in the effort, it will eventually be much more fun than any racing "game" you have ever tried.

2) It requires effort, meaning hours in game and possibly some "studying" (youtube videos, etc): in my case, as i have a demanding job and a family, it has meant that after 6 months i can basically race only in 2 circuits, as those are the ones i had the time to properly learn to afford to race at least at a "basic" level (meaning that if i don't f**ck up i will have fun and not ruin someone else's race -like i did yesterday).

3) Don't bother with multiplayer (public or private) until you are absolutely proficient and reasonably fast on any given track. Just forget about it, as there is an enormous chance you will be ruining someone else's fun and not have fun yourself in the first place.

4) Don't bother with setups: just go with safe setup and ride. Setups do make a difference, but it's possibly the last thing you will need to change to improve your lap times. I am still faster with "safe" setups vs. "aggressive" setups. Which means that my technique is still very weak.

5) Choose the easiest track to practice in the beginning, which is Monza, choose a car, and then stick with it. Just stick with it. There are no faster or slower cars, not at the level you will probably be for a very long time (this obviously depends on how much you play per week or month).

6) The one thing you need to understand is that at the beginning this is not about going at your limit every single lap. Only Pro drivers can do that, and you are not. This is about being able to deliver lap after lap at a consistent pace, without crashing. If you approach every lap thinking to ride the limit, you will crash. You will not end the race. Never. And in the process, you will probably destroy someone else's race (which does not matter when racing with AI, it does matter when racing with humans).

7) The first thing that can make you enormously faster without even realizing it is understanding that what matters the most is the EXIT speed after a turn. If you brake 10 meters later you will gain a few cents of a second on the lap, if you exit 10km/h faster you might gain a second on that lap. And you won't even realize it, you will have the impression of going at your usual pace. So, focus on braking early at the beginning, doing a proper turn and maximizing your exit speed. Braking at the very last possible spot is like setups, it does matter, but you have many more important things to focus on first.

8) The second thing is line choice: watch some videos as nailing the perfect line can mean seconds vs. when you begin. I believe the perfect training ground to understand and practice this is the Eau Rouge at Spa. Virtually Any driver in ACC (with any car) will do it flat out with no problems. It took me possibly tens of tries before i could do my first clean flat out, and the difference between doing it or not is simply being able to drive the car in the exact line it's supposed to be driven in. And it means a second or more on the lap time.

9) Your progression on any given circuit should look like this: practice alone first until you can deliver consistent laps. Then start racing AI on that circuit, and put AI level slightly above you. Again, understand that the objective is not to win the race, but to end it, ideally after you had some nice clean battles. The right difficulty level should make you end race somewhere in the middle of the pack in my opinion. Finally, try multiplayer, with your only objective being to cleanly finish the race and not crashing into anyone.

10) Passing somebody (AI or real) means that you must be 90% sure that you can pass them without risking an incident. You can pass them when you are clearly and CLEANLY faster at the passing spot. It might mean that you will have to wait many turns or laps before committing to a pass. I think virtually everybody in the beginning will naturally do what is called "dive bombing". Look for this on Youtube, and understand that you don't want to do that. You really don't.

11) Reduce as much as possible all riding sounds (i.e. engine), max out tyre sounds. There are several tutorials on this. This will give you a clear indication on when your tyres are at their limit, which is where they are supposed to be when turning.

12) All the fancy gear will have the least impact on your performance. A good driver riding a 100$ wheel / pedals setup will still be several seconds faster then me even if i buy a 10k setup. This said, expensive gear (wheels and pedals being the most important thing) will be much more fun to ride (and like setups, yes it will make you faster).

13) Crew Chief software can help a lot. Look for it.

14) Once you feel you are ready for multiplayer, don't go into public lobbies. On this site and others they organise daily races for all levels, and you will have a much better chance of not finding in game somebody dive bombing into you while riding drunk.

15) If you want your friends to try out the game, go into settings and turn off rating to "multiplayer only". Don't forget to turn it back on when they finish.

16) Unfortunately, it is normal to be several, several seconds slower than the "hotlaps" or records that you see on Youtube. And no, it's not because they have a better set-up. Again, this is a simulation, and just like in real life, riding at the limit means that if you ride a certain turn at 90% throttle you will be as fast as you possibly can be, if you ride the same turn with the same setup with the same line at 90.3% throttle you will crash. This is why top F1 drivers earn millions. This is not what you should be aiming for at the beginning, and probably for a very long time.
 
Messages
592
Points
967
I find it ridiculous to read the term simulator are not game for the wrong reason.

Taken from wikipedia.
A video game or computer game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface or input device – such as a joystick, controller, keyboard, or motion sensing device – to generate visual feedback. This feedback is shown on a video display device, such as a TV set, monitor, touchscreen, or virtual reality headset. Video games are often augmented with audio feedback delivered through speakers or headphones, and sometimes with other types of feedback, including haptic technology.

Almost all the games available on planet earth require effort to perform well in them.

Obviously peeps on planet earth will stop reading after #1. Cause it's funny in a sad way.
 
Messages
592
Points
967
“Almost all the games available on planet earth require effort to perform well in them.”

No, not even close.
Simulation is bottom tier in term of difficulty. This is a poll about people who play all type of games.
Organize.jpg
 
Messages
592
Points
967
The link is written inside the jpeg file. If you're asking, I believe you so strongly attached to your belief. Also, I do not trust your intention. I will not put the effort to write it down.

It's dumb to claim simulation racing is not a game. All those promotion it's ultra realistic & near lifelike experience is wrong. Cause, complaining about simracing interaction is a common occurrence. It's always hilarious to read.
Games are riddled with quirks from up to bottom. It never gets old.

Why I point out all games require skill. As soon as you compete online, the possibility is infinite. The more peeps competes, the more it is difficult. Also, in you used a terrible example of skill. Takes a lot of skill to keep your foot down on the throttle button on a specific corner.
1520218109479


 

vannib

Premium
Messages
44
Points
152
The link is written inside the jpeg file. If you're asking, I believe you so strongly attached to your belief. Also, I do not trust your intention. I will not put the effort to write it down.

It's dumb to claim simulation racing is not a game. All those promotion it's ultra realistic & near lifelike experience is wrong. Cause, complaining about simracing interaction is a common occurrence. It's always hilarious to read.
Games are riddled with quirks from up to bottom. It never gets old.

Why I point out all games require skill. As soon as you compete online, the possibility is infinite. The more peeps competes, the more it is difficult. Also, in you used a terrible example of skill. Takes a lot of skill to keep your foot down on the throttle button on a specific corner.
1520218109479



1) I understand you are pointing myself to a poll done on some internet forum about pc gaming where some 500 people have voted what they think is the most difficult game type to master. I'm taking this assumption from your screenshot as i hope you'll forgive me if i don't take the time to write down letter for letter your link, since you don't bother to do a copy'n'paste. You're evidently way too smart for that.

2) I also understand that would be your "proof" that "simulations" are not even close to being among the hardest games in the world of gaming.

This leads me to the following logical conclusions:

1) You think that a random internet poll with 500 votes can be a proof of something. That could close the argument, but i think you deserve some further attention since you feel entitled to quote Mr. Einstein.

2) You either do not know or don't understand that pc gaming represent less than a quarter of the total gaming market. Which means that your poll is irrelevant per se.

3) Furthermore, you fail to understand that people can and will vote for the games they play and know, not for the ones they never have played. I'll let you make a google search on the combined PC gaming market share of iracing, ACC, etc. Do that, than compare that share to the combined market share of FPS, Strategy and Fighting games. Look at the two figures, tell me if you see a pattern, and try to make whatever you have inside your head do some basic math and see if a doubt arise in your Einstein's brain.

This said, i'm afraid i'm not smart enough to understand why you bother to answer with some idiotic argument to someone who has written a post to help beginners get started in this simulation, game, or whatever you want to call it.
But if you think you can turn on ACC, get into a race and have fun, just like you can do in Call of Duty, Mortal Kombat or whatever, hey that's fine for me, really.

To close this for both of us, i'll give you a quote you can actually make some use of:
"never argue with an idiot, they will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience".

Good luck, you need it.
 
Last edited:

RasmusP

Premium
Messages
7,489
Points
7,022
Nice post! Thanks for the effort towards the community!

This said, i'm afraid i'm not smart enough to understand why you bother to answer with some idiotic argument to someone who has written a post to help beginners get started in this simulation, game, or whatever you want to call it.
Quite a few people here have him on their ignore list for a reason. "Sorry" that it hit your fresh thread.. I guess..

My only slight critique would be that you could've used some big-block "headlines" to give your post some structure together with a few more line breaks after sentence endings.

I enjoyed reading through it either way though!
 
Messages
900
Points
1,067
Hi All,
thought to make a post aimed at people starting out in ACC sharing my lessons as a beginner after a few tens of hours spent in game and my first semi-competitive multiplayer races.
I'm writing this in the desire of helping someone who is just starting out.
Obviously your mileage will vary based on skills, and obviously rigorously my humble opinion.

Sorry for the long post, this is just for people starting out. Don't bother if you're not a beginner, there will be no value for you here.

1) Understand that ACC is a simulation, not a "game": if your objective is just to turn on a game, ride and and be competitive, this is not for you. This said, if you put in the effort, it will eventually be much more fun than any racing "game" you have ever tried.

2) It requires effort, meaning hours in game and possibly some "studying" (youtube videos, etc): in my case, as i have a demanding job and a family, it has meant that after 6 months i can basically race only in 2 circuits, as those are the ones i had the time to properly learn to afford to race at least at a "basic" level (meaning that if i don't f**ck up i will have fun and not ruin someone else's race -like i did yesterday).

3) Don't bother with multiplayer (public or private) until you are absolutely proficient and reasonably fast on any given track. Just forget about it, as there is an enormous chance you will be ruining someone else's fun and not have fun yourself in the first place.

4) Don't bother with setups: just go with safe setup and ride. Setups do make a difference, but it's possibly the last thing you will need to change to improve your lap times. I am still faster with "safe" setups vs. "aggressive" setups. Which means that my technique is still very weak.

5) Choose the easiest track to practice in the beginning, which is Monza, choose a car, and then stick with it. Just stick with it. There are no faster or slower cars, not at the level you will probably be for a very long time (this obviously depends on how much you play per week or month).

6) The one thing you need to understand is that at the beginning this is not about going at your limit every single lap. Only Pro drivers can do that, and you are not. This is about being able to deliver lap after lap at a consistent pace, without crashing. If you approach every lap thinking to ride the limit, you will crash. You will not end the race. Never. And in the process, you will probably destroy someone else's race (which does not matter when racing with AI, it does matter when racing with humans).

7) The first thing that can make you enormously faster without even realizing it is understanding that what matters the most is the EXIT speed after a turn. If you brake 10 meters later you will gain a few cents of a second on the lap, if you exit 10km/h faster you might gain a second on that lap. And you won't even realize it, you will have the impression of going at your usual pace. So, focus on braking early at the beginning, doing a proper turn and maximizing your exit speed. Braking at the very last possible spot is like setups, it does matter, but you have many more important things to focus on first.

8) The second thing is line choice: watch some videos as nailing the perfect line can mean seconds vs. when you begin. I believe the perfect training ground to understand and practice this is the Eau Rouge at Spa. Virtually Any driver in ACC (with any car) will do it flat out with no problems. It took me possibly tens of tries before i could do my first clean flat out, and the difference between doing it or not is simply being able to drive the car in the exact line it's supposed to be driven in. And it means a second or more on the lap time.

9) Your progression on any given circuit should look like this: practice alone first until you can deliver consistent laps. Then start racing AI on that circuit, and put AI level slightly above you. Again, understand that the objective is not to win the race, but to end it, ideally after you had some nice clean battles. The right difficulty level should make you end race somewhere in the middle of the pack in my opinion. Finally, try multiplayer, with your only objective being to cleanly finish the race and not crashing into anyone.

10) Passing somebody (AI or real) means that you must be 90% sure that you can pass them without risking an incident. You can pass them when you are clearly and CLEANLY faster at the passing spot. It might mean that you will have to wait many turns or laps before committing to a pass. I think virtually everybody in the beginning will naturally do what is called "dive bombing". Look for this on Youtube, and understand that you don't want to do that. You really don't.

11) Reduce as much as possible all riding sounds (i.e. engine), max out tyre sounds. There are several tutorials on this. This will give you a clear indication on when your tyres are at their limit, which is where they are supposed to be when turning.

12) All the fancy gear will have the least impact on your performance. A good driver riding a 100$ wheel / pedals setup will still be several seconds faster then me even if i buy a 10k setup. This said, expensive gear (wheels and pedals being the most important thing) will be much more fun to ride (and like setups, yes it will make you faster).

13) Crew Chief software can help a lot. Look for it.

14) Once you feel you are ready for multiplayer, don't go into public lobbies. On this site and others they organise daily races for all levels, and you will have a much better chance of not finding in game somebody dive bombing into you while riding drunk.

15) If you want your friends to try out the game, go into settings and turn off rating to "multiplayer only". Don't forget to turn it back on when they finish.

16) Unfortunately, it is normal to be several, several seconds slower than the "hotlaps" or records that you see on Youtube. And no, it's not because they have a better set-up. Again, this is a simulation, and just like in real life, riding at the limit means that if you ride a certain turn at 90% throttle you will be as fast as you possibly can be, if you ride the same turn with the same setup with the same line at 90.3% throttle you will crash. This is why top F1 drivers earn millions. This is not what you should be aiming for at the beginning, and probably for a very long time.
To be honest, you're taking these games way too seriously. I'd say that most people in here did the exact opposite of what you're outlining here when they started playing racing sims. With these lessons in mind, I probably would have given up after 2 hours. This genre can't afford to scare away players.
 
Messages
592
Points
967
I'm a break down what I understood in the first post.

Argument 1: ACC is a simulator & not a game.
Justification: The game is not for peeps who turn on the game & hope to be competitive
Contradiction: Almost all the games require learning curves. Also, the justification makes no sense, why it's not a game.

Argument 2: It requires effort
Justification: Have no time to play for 6 months
Contradiction: It's fascinating to play little & also require effort. Logic crumble...

Argument 3: Don't bother with multiplayer until you're fast
Justification: Ruin someone else fun
OK: Makes sense.

Argument 4: Don't bother with setups
Justification: Setup makes difference, although it's the last thing to think about to improve lap time.
Contradiction: Setup improves lap time. Peeps explore simracing, because of setup.

Argument 5: Play one track, same car
Justification: There are no faster or slower cars
Contradiction: Justification makes no sense.

Argument 6: This is not about going at your limit every lap
Justification: You are not a pro
Contradiction: Justification makes no sense

Argument 7: What matter the most is the exits speed after a turn
Justification: You exit 10km/h faster you gain a second a lap
Contradiction: Peeps cut time by trail braking. It's done during the entry phase. You get more grip by having the front planted. Also, it allow the car to have the correct position to exit the corner.

Argument 8: Watch video nailing perfect lines
Justification: Peeps in ACC go flat out without problem
OK: It's about correct

Argument 9: Practice alone until you can deliver consistent laps
Justification: Understanding the aim is not to win races
Contradiction: WhaT? O_o

I believe it's dishonest to leave peeps in the dark. It leads to insanity.
 
Last edited:

vannib

Premium
Messages
44
Points
152
I'm a break down what I understood in the first post.

Argument 1: ACC is a simulator & not a game.
Justification: The game is not for peeps who turn on the game & hope to be competitive
Contradiction: Almost all the games require learning curves. Also, the justification makes no sense, why it's not a game.

Argument 2: It requires effort
Justification: Have no time to play for 6 months
Contradiction: It's fascinating to play little & also require effort. Logic crumble...

Argument 3: Don't bother with multiplayer until you're fast
Justification: Ruin someone else fun
OK: Makes sense.

Argument 4: Don't bother with setups
Justification: Setup makes difference, although it's the last thing to think about to improve lap time.
Contradiction: Setup improves lap time. Peeps explore simracing, because of setup.

Argument 5: Play one track, same car
Justification: There are no faster or slower cars
Contradiction: Justification makes no sense.

Argument 6: This is not about going at your limit every lap
Justification: You are not a pro
Contradiction: Justification makes no sense

Argument 7: What matter the most is the exits speed after a turn
Justification: You exit 10km/h faster you gain a second a lap
Contradiction: Peeps cut time by trail braking. It's done during the entry phase. You get more grip by having the front planted. Also, it allow the car to have the correct position to exit the corner.

Argument 8: Watch video nailing perfect lines
Justification: Peeps in ACC go flat out without problem
OK: It's about correct

Argument 9: Practice alone until you can deliver consistent laps
Justification: Understanding the aim is not to win races
Contradiction: WhaT? O_o

I believe it's dishonest to leave peeps in the dark. It leads to insanity.

I'll answer for the same reason i wrote the post in the beginning: to do my best in helping newcomers, just like i was immensely helped here by some guys on setting up my rig.

Contradiction: Almost all the games require learning curves. Also, the justification makes no sense, why it's not a game.

--> Any game will require a learning curve, that's obvious and applies to virtually everything in life.
But not every game will require a long learning curve before being able to even remotely compete with other people on-line.

Contradiction: It's fascinating to play little & also require effort. Logic crumble...

--> Which contradiction to you see? I've spent all of my playing time on basically 2 tracks using 1 car. If i spent the same amount of hours across all tracks i could not do a single online race by now.

Contradiction: Setup improves lap time. Peeps explore simracing, because of setup.

--> Of course setups can improve lap times. But a beginner might think that he is 3-4-5-6 seconds slower than other guys because of his setup, and thus spend his time tweaking setups, trying countless setups, etc. Which is not where you should be spending your time when you are several seconds off the average pace on the grid.
There is one caveat that i should have mentioned, and i didn't: the one thing you do need to take care of is tyre pressures, as that has a very significant, game-changing impact. There are tutorials on this.

Argument 5: Play one track, same car
Justification: There are no faster or slower cars
Contradiction: Justification makes no sense.

--> If after trying a bit the various cars you don't stick with the one you felt more suitable to you, you will be wasting time. Because no, there are no significantly faster or slower cars. On the contrary, sticking with one car and learning deep inside-out how that car behaves will make you a hell of a lot faster than simply swapping for another car because there is an alien on youtube who set the track record with another car (and that record will probably be like 0.4 faster then the record set with your car).

Contradiction: Peeps cut time by trail braking. It's done during the entry phase. You get more grip by having the front planted. Also, it allow the car to have the correct position to exit the corner.

--> I didn't say that where you brake is not important. I've just said that it's much more important do do the turn right and focus on exit speed rather than being able to brake 10 meters later.

Argument 9: Practice alone until you can deliver consistent laps
Justification: Understanding the aim is not to win races
Contradiction: WhaT? O_o

--> Unless you are gifted with some special driving talent, when you are a beginner it will be impossible to win a race if you are racing in any decent lobby. Because you WILL be seconds off the average pace of the top guys in the race. So, instead of driving each lap like it was your last quali lap, which will inevitably end up with a crash, you should be focusing at driving at a "comfortable pace", avoid incidents, and try to improve. And by the way, you will most likely end up the race in a much better final position as you will pass by all the guys that were not able to be consistent. The one thing all winners have in common is not that they're fast, it's that they've finished the race. So that should be your first goal.
 
Last edited:
Messages
592
Points
967
There is really no need to defend your initial statements. I do agree with them and even if I didn't what you wrote was your perception of your journey in sim racing and no one should discredit them.
I just shared some of the justification that made no sense or unclear. When peeps write, it need to be clear. I mean it should be easy the grasp the intention.

I wouldn't comment in the thread, If I wouldn't care about the person. I believe he can write it in a more convincing way. Stating It's not a game, because it's hard. It's incoherent for peeps on planet earth.
 
Messages
2
Points
1
Serious question: at what point do you decide you're proficient enough to race other people? Is there an AI level you shoot for? Hot laps within somene certain percentile?

I'm mostly playing RRE, but the situation is similar. I chose one car and one track. Practiced until consistently clean. Then hot lap, knocked a few seconds of my time consistently. Then raced AI, learned to overtake cleanly, and frankly how to get passed cleanly. Raced in a ranked rookie server and got absolutely torched. I've had a few good battles at the back of the pack, and haven't wrecked anyone, but man, I'm like a Haas out there.

So my initial question: how do you know you're reasonably competitive, other than just jumping in and trying?
 
Messages
5
Points
6
I've been confused for a long time why the rear of a merc or a porsche suddenly loses grip when upshifting in corner exits? Is it a setup problem? I basicly run them on default aggressive.
 
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900
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1,067
Serious question: at what point do you decide you're proficient enough to race other people? Is there an AI level you shoot for? Hot laps within somene certain percentile?

I'm mostly playing RRE, but the situation is similar. I chose one car and one track. Practiced until consistently clean. Then hot lap, knocked a few seconds of my time consistently. Then raced AI, learned to overtake cleanly, and frankly how to get passed cleanly. Raced in a ranked rookie server and got absolutely torched. I've had a few good battles at the back of the pack, and haven't wrecked anyone, but man, I'm like a Haas out there.

So my initial question: how do you know you're reasonably competitive, other than just jumping in and trying?
You're proficient enough to race other people when your lap times with a certain car/track combo don't improve anymore. There's no shame in finishing at the back of the pack. You can also watch other drivers in the race monitor during practice to see their lines and braking points.
 
Last edited:

Gevatter

The James May of Simracing
Premium
Messages
1,473
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1
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Serious question: at what point do you decide you're proficient enough to race other people? Is there an AI level you shoot for? Hot laps within somene certain percentile?
So my initial question: how do you know you're reasonably competitive, other than just jumping in and trying?
These are all just my subjective opinions and experience, but I'd say those are two different questions. Being proficient doesn't necessarily mean being fast. It means being able to finish race distance without spinning, being able to manage your fuel & tires if you're doing longer races and not being a hazard to others by being comfortable enough in your car an on the track to have some mental capacity left over to process the other drivers around you and to be able to react to them properly.

Being competitive means all the above plus being fast enough to score points.
 
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