newbie on oversteer

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Alexw1984

Ive tried to read up on this but i can't find anything on the problem im having. I bought Race07 a few weeks a go and started trying to get to grips with it and went straight for the WTCC and the BMW E90 as its RWD and wanted to go that route. I often get the problem of oversteer when coming out of a corner, which isn't a problem usually except sometimes when i counter steer to control the back end of the car snaps round back the other way and no matter how much i steer back the other way, the car spins.
I'm not sure exactly whats causing it, lifting off maybe? I try not to do that as i know the result but i'm lost. It tends to be the same corners over and over - theres a 2nd gear turning about midway through Curitiba '07 where it happens quite frequently. How can i cure this habbit ive developed of losing control like this?
 
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Alexw1984

Sorry, just realised i missed a bit of info, after steering to correct the over steer the back end switches/snaps back round the other way so i have to steer back but im never able to control it. Standard over steer i can control (and can enjoy :p) but when it does this i can never control it.
 

Dave Stephenson

RaceDepartment Technical Administrator
Staff member
Premium
Sep 4, 2007
10,001
1,606
To recover from big snaps like that I find a technique using the brake and acelerator to gether quickly gets traction back to all four boots.

Here are some other driving techniques that can't be inserted in any specific category.


  • Turn versus the curve to correct over steer (aka induced understeer). Expert pilots manage to use this particular technique to turn at the most extreme limit of grip, without upsetting the car very much. What they do is that they actually turn versus the curve instead of counter steering in order to control over steer. What it really happens is that while the car has less grip at the rear tires, and shows over steer behavior, the driver turns even more, asking more grip from front tires and eventually going over their limit, thus provoking understeer that amazingly neutralize oversteer! This can happen with extremely agile cars and very sensitive race slick tires, because its faster to provoke understeer at such cars, than countersteer and catch the over steer with the risk of a pendulum effect. Fernando Alonso demonstrates this technique in almost all the slow to medium speed curves with his Renault F1 car.
    To better understand the theory behind this technique, you must study the behavior of tires and terms like slipangle. soon to come in Flying Pig Pedia.
  • Keep the gas pedal flat down, while pressing violently the brake pedal to save an almost certain spin. This is another very particular technique that fortunately is easier to achieve with simracing pedals. It works only in rear wheel drive cars and consists of keeping full power on the rear wheels preventing them from blocking, while at the same time locking the front wheels with powerful braking. The front locked tires have less grip than the rear slipping tires and automaticaly neutralize the oversteering effect, possibly saving the car from an almost certain spin.
the rest of the articles can be found here, check the driving techniques page lots of usefull info http://flyingpigpedia.wetpaint.com/page/Driving+School?t=anon
 

Adam Vaughan

2000RPM
Nov 11, 2008
2,745
9
31
Also some corners shift up early. Im dong this with the GT cars just to stop it. I can handle it without up shifting early but im inconsistent and this helps.
 
N

Nick Price

fiddling with your throttle sensitivity can also help power on oversteer if you have a twitchy right foot hehe, i generally keep my throttle sensitivity at 50%, maybe a bit less if im driving GTpro's to help me keep everything pointing in the right direction on corner exits :good:
 

Dan Coldrick

500RPM
Mar 17, 2008
928
17
36
Keep the gas pedal flat down, while pressing violently the brake pedal to save an almost certain spin. This is another very particular technique that fortunately is easier to achieve with simracing pedals. It works only in rear wheel drive cars and consists of keeping full power on the rear wheels preventing them from blocking, while at the same time locking the front wheels with powerful braking. The front locked tires have less grip than the rear slipping tires and automaticaly neutralize the oversteering effect, possibly saving the car from an almost certain spin.
That looks good, might give it a try :)
 

Dave Stephenson

RaceDepartment Technical Administrator
Staff member
Premium
Sep 4, 2007
10,001
1,606
It works. Flat down doesn't always give you best and quickest escape but you'll get used to modulating it pretty fast.
 
A

Ariff Roose

try playing with the throttle.. it works for me as you can see in this picture: my rev is low at gear 3 and powersliding continuously.
after that just release the throttle and let go of the wheel. it works on me. i use keyboard. -.-"
 

Attachments

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Alexw1984

i think i sorted it out. When the car was oversteering i think i was releasing the throttle so it turned from a power oversteer in one direction to lift off over steer in the other, if that makes sense? Ive taught myself to modulate throttle and can get the car back in check while losing very little time :D Thanks for your help!

I also fiddled with some settings in the setup guide, im struggling the see the differences so far but i'm not changing much. I just wish i had more time to practise :(
 
Jun 9, 2008
32
0
I would say try to use longer gears to start with. Especially making the 2nd gear longer would help with ur oversteer problem from slow corners.