• “Just being a mediocre driver has never been my ambition. That's not my style” ― Michael Schumacher
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Have a chance to win a copy of F1 2017 The Game (PC) by following RaceDepartment on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Twitch, Steam and / or YouTube.

Getting used to rFactor 2

Discussion in 'rFactor 2' started by The_Grand_Duchess, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. The_Grand_Duchess

    The_Grand_Duchess

    Messages:
    20
    Ratings:
    +5
    Hello everyone, I'd like some tips on getting started with rFactor 2. As of right now i have a 360 controller that i use and not much else. What I'm wanting to get into is endurance racing, such as the mod made by EnduRacers and so far i can manage their F430 to a degree, but I'm miles off pace either because I'm doubting my abilities or afraid of the car suddenly wanting to kiss a wall at 130mph. Just wanted some pointers to help me at least keep up with the other cars in the field, be they AI or not.
     
  2. hitm4k3r

    hitm4k3r

    Messages:
    184
    Ratings:
    +108
    A good start is to adjust AI step by step. So you start with a difficulty setting that roughly matches your skill and drive on that level over a longer period of time. If you notice that it gets too easy for you and that you allways win you increase the difficulty and start the procedure . Don't be affraid when the AI beats you in qualifying - that's usual.

    I would recommend to start with a single make mod like the Clio cup from ISI and stick to one track at a time. That way you can learn the track very effectively and familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of your car. Most important thing is that you are patient and don't give up too easily. It requires time and practice to get a competent racer and the fastest guys are not allways the best drivers. Try to get consistent in laptimes and don't fiddle with setups (maybe just the fuel load) for now. Another good thing is to simulate a race week end with practice, qualy, race and maybe warmup. I hope that helps for a start. You will see, it is really rewarding when it clicks. ;)
     
  3. The_Grand_Duchess

    The_Grand_Duchess

    Messages:
    20
    Ratings:
    +5
    I've been doing alot of practice with the USF2000 cars (i genuinely dislike the way the clio handles) in fact it's what I'm doing right now, have been for the past week or so. My biggest problems so far with just about every car/track is wheel spin and general oversteer which in turn causes me to drive a lot slower coming in to and out of corners that i should be. And thank you for the suggestion on the AI strength, I never really thought about that :p
     
  4. Gui Cramer

    Gui Cramer

    Messages:
    1,587
    Ratings:
    +780
    Other people may be able to help with more information, but what are your controller's sensitivity and linearity settings? It can be your inputs are too strong initially and you lose balance.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. The_Grand_Duchess

    The_Grand_Duchess

    Messages:
    20
    Ratings:
    +5
    Sensitivity is around 5% and my Deadzone (I assume that's what you mean by linearity) is 13% because my controller's joysticks are almost never fully centered. For steering I mean.
     
  6. Marc Collins

    Marc Collins

    Messages:
    570
    Ratings:
    +166
    Honestly, you need to get a real steering wheel. It would help with any racing game, but rF2 is about as far away from a console racer as you can get. It is not impossible to play with a joystick or game controller, but 99.8% of people will have vastly more success with real wheel and pedals.

    Even with a real wheel, the vast majority of people do not have the patience or skills to learn how to drive and race properly with realistic damage, etc.

    It's up to you, but I would not handicap myself by a factor of 20 when trying to master the most difficult/realistic racing sim on the market. It's hard enough with the right equipment.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Angry Angry x 1
  7. Gui Cramer

    Gui Cramer

    Messages:
    1,587
    Ratings:
    +780
    There's always steering assist that can be set on low so it doesn't interfere with the driving, only assists with a smoother input.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Slyfrequency

    Slyfrequency

    Messages:
    1,014
    Ratings:
    +380
    Yeah, if you're wanting to get into rFactor, or any sim for that matter, especially for endurance races, I'd highly recommend a wheel rather than a controller. Even if it's a cheap steering wheel, it will definitely help because steering wheels are made for racing games, controllers, not so much

    Only other thing I can recommend is practice practice practice, try different racing lines, adjust your stability and traction control settings, a good way to learn a track fast is put a good amount of AI on track and try and follow them, watch for their braking points and race line etc. :)
     
  9. The_Grand_Duchess

    The_Grand_Duchess

    Messages:
    20
    Ratings:
    +5
    The first thing I intend to do when i get the money is get a T300 or something similar, but so far I can run a smooth-ish lap on Mid-Ohio in the F430 pretty decently with only auto-clutch on. Not really sure why I'm so drawn to Endurance racing but it's just something I really find myself wanting to do.
     
  10. Booth.the.doberman

    Booth.the.doberman

    Messages:
    191
    Ratings:
    +27
    If you're spinning as you're accelerating coming out of a corner, you can reduce the spin by turning the differential power to a lower number. Short-shifting (shifting before the rpms reach max) can also help. As you get better, you can tune these to your style.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. The_Grand_Duchess

    The_Grand_Duchess

    Messages:
    20
    Ratings:
    +5
    I just want to thank you all for actually taking your time to try and help me out a little bit. :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. Slyfrequency

    Slyfrequency

    Messages:
    1,014
    Ratings:
    +380
    Have a T300, best purchase I ever made, might only come with two pedals but it gives such good force feedback!

    Endurance racing is fun and at the end it's a good sense of achievement, especially managing tyres, getting good pit stop times and keeping a good pace thoughout.

    At the end of the day, as long as you're having fun, that's all that matters :thumbsup:
     
  13. The_Grand_Duchess

    The_Grand_Duchess

    Messages:
    20
    Ratings:
    +5
    I'd kill to be able to actually simulate a full 24h race at some point and actually finish it in one piece :)
     
  14. Slyfrequency

    Slyfrequency

    Messages:
    1,014
    Ratings:
    +380
    24 Hours on your own? That'd take some preparation. I remember back in the day when Gran Turismo 5 just came out and there was 8 guys doing a 24 hour race and by the end 2 were still on track but had both crashed at some point :roflmao:

    I'm currently about to start an offline endurance league, which should be interesting, only doing 1/2 Hour races tho :)
     
  15. Emery

    Emery

    Messages:
    1,245
    Ratings:
    +384
    "Resume from replay" comes in very handy if you want to try it in shorter bursts. Just remember that you want to resume from somewhere that you're moving rather than sitting in the pits (which crashes for some reason). Typically people resume just after they make their pitstop.

    30 minute races are just about the minimum for me... recently won a 2.4 hr LeMans race online. Then competed in a 90 minute online race 12 hrs later. Yeah, I was sore & tired after that! Friend quipped that I needed an agent who didn't book races so close together, LOL.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. The_Grand_Duchess

    The_Grand_Duchess

    Messages:
    20
    Ratings:
    +5
    Sounds about right, lol
     
  17. Kevin Knorpp

    Kevin Knorpp

    Messages:
    548
    Ratings:
    +161
    • Like Like x 1