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F1 2010 Qualifying Setups ???

Discussion in 'F1 2010 - The Game' started by Naqs, Aug 31, 2011.

  1. Hi There. I have noticed, that racing set ups doesn't give you the grip and speed what needed in Qualifying. I drive in a League, called F1 HCM & and one of our guys is just over powered in Q's. He allways gets the pole from 1 sec to almost 2 seconds. I've just wondering, he might have a Qualifying setup and Race setup. Share your comments and talk about this.

    My PS3 Account is: CrazyFinnBoy You can add me in PS3 and talk with me or just play :)
  2. Bram

    Roaring Pipes Maniacs | #27 Staff Premium Member

    Or he is just a better driver?
  3. Andrew Bortz

    Andrew Bortz

    Sounds like a better driver to me 2.
  4. Thats not right.. You see i'm currently the leagues #1 driver :wink: That guy got an huge Qualifying advantage but in race he falls 5-6 position with no mistakes. I'm pretty sure that he has some kind of Qualifying setups what suites the Green Track, tires and fuel.
  5. Maybe he takes after me. Can normally hook up 1 decent lap in quali, but gets bogged down, lose concentration, small mistakes / bad lines during the race.
  6. maybe his set up struggles with the fuel load which slows him down when racing
  7. David O'Reilly

    David O'Reilly
    A bad quali means I can go forwards in the race.

    I think the above posts raise some good reasons.
    Some guys are good over 1 lap and can't deal with the variations of a GP race.
    Others don't shine in quali but deliver consistently in the Race.
    The variance you speak of is big though!
    Qualifying setups vs Race setups.
    It’s all a question of tactics and being able to pass your rivals in the race. Being slower in the tight sections is no great penalty because it is not easy for other drivers to pass you there.” Alain Prost.
    Some drivers will have a separate race and qualifying setup, many do not. The theory is that in qualifying with low fuel and possibly options your corner speeds and top speed will be higher than in the race setup. This will impact gearing and wing decisions. Also while your qualifying setup is to find the ultimate solo lap time conversely your race setup may be optimized for certain overtaking points on a given track. Take Valencia for example: long fast straights and slow corners. In such a race one may decide that there will be overtaking opportunities on the straights that suit a low wing setup. One may also decide that the aero influence is negligible in many of the corners and that the slow corners don’t represent an overtaking opportunity or threat. The decision may be made to move away from the setup that gave you the fastest lap time to one that makes you faster on the straights. You will then need to manage the inherent compromise in the corners.
    When one thinks this phenomena through it becomes clear that the characteristics of the track will dictate whether it (two setups) is a strong option. In the authors view tracks that are consistently fast or offer medium to high speed corners (Monza, Spa, Catalunya, Silverstone) and tracks that are consistently tight (Monaco, Hungary) will offer the least to gain from divergent setups. This is due to the fact that what gave you the fastest qualifying time will be needed in the race. At Monza for example you need ultra high speed in qualifying and the race. At Spa you need a balance of high speed and good high speed (aero influenced) cornering.
    On the other hand tracks that feature a big variety of some high speed sections and low speed (mechanical grip) corners (Valencia, Marina Bay, Abu Dhabi) will potentially offer gains from divergent setups from qualifying to race. It’s not a cut and dried topic and all open for experimentation-enjoy.