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2011 V8 Supercars

Discussion in 'Motorsports' started by David Garcia, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. Hi guys,

    I always considered this as my favourite series... how could I follow it now? I am a bit lost.

    Thanks!
     
  2. MotorsTV show V8 time to time but it's not that often that it's live.
     
  3. Tbh - I download the torrents - it's the only decent way I can keep properly in touch with it.
     
  4. What Ryan said, been following it for the past couple of years via torrents. PM if you want a motorsports related tracker.
     
  5. I don't have an invite left, hope Senad does :)
     
  6. Guess we're on different sites, this one is open, but very low profile :)
     
  7. PM? :D
     
  8. I think me and Ryan are on the same site, just sent David my last invite.

    :)
     
  9. IF anyone has a invite left then please pm me, love these cars and would love to see them!
     
  10. Not news to me... I've been keeping up with the road car industry through Wheels Magazine, and I've known of this possibilty for months. Still, to see it pretty much confirmed is rather depressing... I'm a Holden guy through and through, but it's really going to suck for Ford fans with no rear-drive hero car in the range.
    Ford's business strategy concerning its Australian operations has not been very smart compared with what GM have done with Holden - GM have made Holden the centre of its rear-wheel-drive design operations because they recognise the significance of the rear-drive Commodore to the Australian Market, and to the company's global aspirations (the Commodore's architecture, Zeta, is also used in the new Chevrolet Camaro and many other new rear-drive vehicles from GM's brands). This has cemented Holden's place in the GM brand network and has pretty much secured the Commodore's rear-wheel drive future. Why Ford didn't do the same with the Falcon is beyond me - may it be that they don't have a place for the current Falcon in their lineup?

    Either way, this is going to be an interesting situation for V8 Supercars - unless the Car of the Future regulations change from the current regs drastically, this will mean that once the non-rear-drive Falcon road car hits the market, the race car will have nothing left in common with the road car (they're different enough now as it is, but the one thing linking the two has been rear wheel drive throughout the championship's history).
     
  11. Warren Dawes

    Warren Dawes
    Premium Member

    From what I have read, the "Car of the Future" regs for V8 Supercars is going to follow the Nascar model ideas, and will be a specifically and tightly controlled car with a shell over the top that looks like it's real brand counterpart. ie. It may look like a Holden (or Falcon, or Toyota etc). It will ,however, be a purpose built racecar designed around a standard format to keep things very equalised.

    Based on this, it won't matter too much what the real road car is, it will only be a very loose image of the V8 Supercar racecar.

    In terms or real car sales, Toyota, Mazda, Honda, etc are starting to dominate in Australia anyway with FWD cars.
     
  12. I realise this... it's just that it doesn't feel right to me if a Touring Car doesn't have at least something in common with its road counterpart. That is what Touring Car racing is supposed to be about, right? It's one of the reasons why I'm not particularly fond of NASCAR, and why I enjoy Touring Car categories such as Super 2000 - at least in that formula, the road car's mechanics are preserved whether it is rear-wheel drive or not.

    That is correct, though in terms of single car models, the Holden Commodore has been Australia's best-selling car for at least a decade.

    However it also brings up an interesting point. Obviously keeping the current format of V8 Supercars (600hp, firebreathing monstrosities of cars) is important, as that's one of the main draws for the series - the cars themselves. The CotF regulations aim to bring more manufacturers into the sport, but are we sure that would actually happen? As you pointed out, front-wheel drive cars dominate the Australian market. Would manufacturers other than Ford or Holden be necessarily prepared to go into the championship knowing that their race cars were nothing like their road counterparts, and would it be worth it for them spending-wise?
     
  13. Honda Civic V8 supercar loooool
     
  14. Warren Dawes

    Warren Dawes
    Premium Member

    I actually agree with you completely Rhys, but sadly that seems to be the way V8 Supercar Racing is headed. It will be interesting to see who else might join the new format. So far I have only read that BMW may be interested.
     
  15. Ross McGregor

    Ross McGregor
    Premium Member

    I don't think V8 Supercars needs another manufacturer- just look at the standard of racing you guys get week in, week out, with just two makes! The Car of the future regs should at least help put some more 'Fords' back on the grid.
     
  16. Didn't really follow all of that in the broadcasts. That sucks.
    Ah, the good ol' 60s, with not only road based cars, but with completely standard road cars :D

    But, if it means significant cost reductions, and the long term survival of the sport, I'll try to live with it :)
     
  17. More manufacturers = more money. Another manufacturer will bring extra funding and sponsorship to the series, and may increase its worlwide exposure even more.
     
  18. I have also been following the situation and there is a question mark as to IF the new Falcon will be 4x4 or Front Wheel Drive. They would have to convert to a V6 cyl for FWD due to the width factor. With a 8 Pot, the car would only need to be maybe 5 cm wider than now. I agree with the people whom are sick of all the rules changes and have HONESTLY considered giving Motor Sport away because of it. F1, Supercars, Indy, Champ, NASCAR, it is all about the money now. Teams are using drivers whom bring the most cash with them, Kayobashi per se. The elite-ness of the sport has suffered and it is simply one big Rule Book. FIA shot themselves in the foot when they allowed Ferrari off with the TEAM ORDERS thing. Why bother, it is a farce.
     
  19. From what I have heard, this has been denied quite vehemently