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Picked off the Shelf: ‘STEVE McQUEEN in LE MANS’, by Garbo Studio

Le Mans #0.jpg


Les 24 Heures du Mans is near and many motorsport fans are impatient to see the race. The question, when it comes to the French classic, is often the same: who will win? Expectations are always up, and waiting can be tiresome. There are many ways to ease it: firing up your favourite sim and run on the virtual racetrack, re-watch races from the past editions, see the teams prepare and read news about the event. Today though, I want to offer you another possible pastime, which comes under the form of a stupendous graphic novel.

“STEVE McQUEEN in LE MANS”, Volume I, by Garbo Studio

Le Mans #6.jpg


This comic book is the fruit of Sandro Garbo’s passion for both the French race and the cult movie “Le Mans” by Steve McQueen. Sandro even states in the credits that the project was born right after the actor visited him in his dreams, one night in 2013! Given his passion for art and classic cars, he ventured on the quest of transposing the drama and the action of the film into graphics, with the help of Guillaume Lopez, who is a Michel Vaillant illustrator. He was later joined by many more artists and talented people, finally forming a group of seven in total. Unfortunately, one the team members, Florian Afflerbach, a German architect and author of a number of publications on architectural drawing, member of the Urban Sketchers community and of USk Germany, died on May 5, 2016, in a motorcycle accident in his country. This book is dedicated to him.

The comic was ready to print in October 2016 and is available for purchase since the 9th of December of the same year. It is the first volume, in a total of two (the second one is currently in the making). It is an official “24 Hours of Le Mans” licensed product (every copy comes with its own validating holographic sticker), and Chad McQueen has personally approved it.

Now, onto the book itself. Dimensions are 34.2 x 24.4 cm (H x W), which roughly translates as 13.4 x 9.5 inches. Pages are 64 in total, and weight comes at around 865 g (1.9 pounds). First thing you will notice when looking at it, is its high level of quality. The paper used is premium grade, and the materials from which the book is made of are excellent. All of the drawings look terrific, and images are sharp and vibrant. The sequence of pictures is very clear and the consecutio is always easily understandable.

The characters are very much believable, with McQueen having a perfect resemblance to his real self, portraying his iconic face expression beautifully. All of the other characters too share the same quality, and react to the events in a credible fashion, which helps the reader being immersed into the narration. Some expressions may be over-exaggerated at times, but that is perfectly in line with the style of a comic.

Le Mans #5.jpg


The cars, which are probably the real protagonists of the story, are detailed in all of their aspects, up to the tiniest ones. Many of them are even displayed as in a showroom in the opening part of the book, listing their most prominent technical aspects along with their magnetic lines. Skins are well painted and the colours choice looks fitting, overall presenting them as they were and looked back then. For sure, the style of a comic book concurs in amplifying the beauty of these classics, making them a spectacular welcome sight.

Le Mans #1.jpg


The colour palette is simply astonishing. The sunrise and sunset are stunning. The rain effects leave you in an awe for how good they look. The lighting, both at day and night time, is perfectly balanced. Combined with the quality of the drawings, it results in an artistic masterpiece of great value. It is clear that this project was realised by professionals, which left nothing to chance in their work.

Le Mans #2.jpg


One thing that I also really liked about this graphic novel is that it is not a mere replica of the movie, transposed on a book, however good it could be. It is actually much more! There are certain aspects and parts of the story in which the author, Garbo, goes deeper in, explaining more about some characters and some events. It helps you understand better the narrative on which the film is based, and in a sense, they complement each other. Absurd as it may sound, it almost seems like the movie was made having the reading of this graphic novel in mind. While at the same time, watching the movie after reading this book gives you that raw sensorial feeling, mainly thanks to sounds, that the tome cannot obviously give.

Le Mans #7.jpg


In conclusion, this short but very dense and well done comic book, coming also at a fairly inexpensive price tag, all considering, is, in my opinion, a must have for every Le Mans junkie and Steve McQueen admirer, while having also a collectible value. Every aspect of it says much about the team behind its production. A small group of genuine motorsport fans, and classic cars lovers. Bring on Volume II lads!

Le Mans #3.jpg


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This was the first issue of “Picked off the Shelf”. A new, exclusive, column, which will feature reviews about the best (and sometimes worst!) books, movies and documentaries about the motorsport!

Have you enjoyed this review? Would you like to see more? Do you have a copy of “Steve McQueen in Le Mans”? What are your thoughts about it? Let us know in the comments section!
 
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Excellent write up and review. I saw this book online some time ago and thought about buying it but have not pulled the trigger yet for some reason unbeknownst to me!
 
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Read this, then go enjoy the new Le Mans DLC for PC2.

Based on my extensive IRL experience driving the Ferrari 512S (i.e. watching the racing scenes in Le Mans over and over about 50 times), this is about as close as it's gonna get for any of us.
 
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It's sad that we live in a time when it's considered acceptable for a grown man to read comic books and collect toys.
 
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961
It's sad that we live in a time when it's considered acceptable for a grown man to read comic books and collect toys.
What’s sad about it? There’s nothing sad about the joy my kids get from my PIXAR Cars diecast collection... I love that we live in a time when such a collection can be built through outlets such as eBay!:)
 
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That feel when you want to replicate those truly awesome arts in Assetto Corsa.
It's sad that we live in a time when it's considered acceptable for a grown man to read comic books and collect toys.

What things are acceptable for grown men according to you?
 
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View attachment 254914

Les 24 Heures du Mans is near and many motorsport fans are impatient to see the race. The question, when it comes to the French classic, is often the same: who will win? Expectations are always up, and waiting can be tiresome. There are many ways to ease it: firing up your favourite sim and run on the virtual racetrack, re-watch races from the past editions, see the teams prepare and read news about the event. Today though, I want to offer you another possible pastime, which comes under the form of a stupendous graphic novel.

“STEVE McQUEEN in LE MANS”, Volume I, by Garbo Studio

View attachment 254915

This comic book is the fruit of Sandro Garbo’s passion for both the French race and the cult movie “Le Mans” by Steve McQueen. Sandro even states in the credits that the project was born right after the actor visited him in his dreams, one night in 2013! Given his passion for art and classic cars, he ventured on the quest of transposing the drama and the action of the film into graphics, with the help of Guillaume Lopez, who is a Michel Vaillant illustrator. He was later joined by many more artists and talented people, finally forming a group of seven in total. Unfortunately, one the team members, Florian Afflerbach, a German architect and author of a number of publications on architectural drawing, member of the Urban Sketchers community and of USk Germany, died on May 5, 2016, in a motorcycle accident in his country. This book is dedicated to him.

The comic was ready to print in October 2016 and is available for purchase since the 9th of December of the same year. It is the first volume, in a total of two (the second one is currently in the making). It is an official “24 Hours of Le Mans” licensed product (every copy comes with its own validating holographic sticker), and Chad McQueen has personally approved it.

Now, onto the book itself. Dimensions are 34.2 x 24.4 cm (H x W), which roughly translates as 13.4 x 9.5 inches. Pages are 64 in total, and weight comes at around 865 g (1.9 pounds). First thing you will notice when looking at it, is its high level of quality. The paper used is premium grade, and the materials from which the book is made of are excellent. All of the drawings look terrific, and images are sharp and vibrant. The sequence of pictures is very clear and the consecutio is always easily understandable.

The characters are very much believable, with McQueen having a perfect resemblance to his real self, portraying his iconic face expression beautifully. All of the other characters too share the same quality, and react to the events in a credible fashion, which helps the reader being immersed into the narration. Some expressions may be over-exaggerated at times, but that is perfectly in line with the style of a comic.

View attachment 254916

The cars, which are probably the real protagonists of the story, are detailed in all of their aspects, up to the tiniest ones. Many of them are even displayed as in a showroom in the opening part of the book, listing their most prominent technical aspects along with their magnetic lines. Skins are well painted and the colours choice looks fitting, overall presenting them as they were and looked back then. For sure, the style of a comic book concurs in amplifying the beauty of these classics, making them a spectacular welcome sight.

View attachment 254917

The colour palette is simply astonishing. The sunrise and sunset are stunning. The rain effects leave you in an awe for how good they look. The lighting, both at day and night time, is perfectly balanced. Combined with the quality of the drawings, it results in an artistic masterpiece of great value. It is clear that this project was realised by professionals, which left nothing to chance in their work.

View attachment 254918

One thing that I also really liked about this graphic novel is that it is not a mere replica of the movie, transposed on a book, however good it could be. It is actually much more! There are certain aspects and parts of the story in which the author, Garbo, goes deeper in, explaining more about some characters and some events. It helps you understand better the narrative on which the film is based, and in a sense, they complement each other. Absurd as it may sound, it almost seems like the movie was made having the reading of this graphic novel in mind. While at the same time, watching the movie after reading this book gives you that raw sensorial feeling, mainly thanks to sounds, that the tome cannot obviously give.

View attachment 254919

In conclusion, this short but very dense and well done comic book, coming also at a fairly inexpensive price tag, all considering, is, in my opinion, a must have for every Le Mans junkie and Steve McQueen admirer, while having also a collectible value. Every aspect of it says much about the team behind its production. A small group of genuine motorsport fans, and classic cars lovers. Bring on Volume II lads!

View attachment 254920

This was the first issue of “Picked off the Shelf”. A new, exclusive, column, which will feature reviews about the best (and sometimes worst!) books, movies and documentaries about the motorsport!

Have you enjoyed this review? Would you like to see more? Do you have a copy of “Steve McQueen in Le Mans”? What are your thoughts about it? Let us know in the comments section!
On my last visit to France I bought myself a copy of Michel Vaillant, have to say, comics about cars are especially timeless
 
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It's sad that we live in a time when it's considered acceptable for a grown man to read comic books and collect toys.
It is never too late to liberate that little Nascrap-guy inside of you, who just wants to read a few Le Mans comics and would like to see a few classic prototypes on his shelf.
Don't lock him away, we can help.

The illustrations are truly beautiful, it really catches the details and translates it to a comic perfectly.
Once I have my new notebook, I will buy it.
 
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I love the deliberate "offbeat" treatment between the pictorial technique adopted for vehicles (worthy of the best illustrators who work with the airbrush, a quality close to photography) ... and the 100% BD style adopted for people and the environment.
The cars are really put in the position of stars!
Sorry for my poor English
 
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NASCRAP said:
It's sad that we live in a time when it's considered acceptable for a grown man to read comic books and collect toys.


Yeah, well,... what I find "sad" is seeing that in this day and age there are still some people who need to put others down (and seem to go out of their way to do so) in order to feel good about themselves... this is what happens when you come to the conclusion that all the wealth in the world can't buy happyness...(or a Conscience) and now that they figured out how easy and simple being happy is... they just bitch about it... 'cause their oversized ego won't Let them "have fun" + "Be Happy"... (What would the neighbours think !?)

Soooo... You know what ?
I hope you have a really nice day!
:)
 
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nice. i used to have one vaillante comic left over from childhood and a couple of really nice polistil f1 diecasts, eg brambillas orange march and the first ever renault turbo, but, being a good father, i let my son play with them for many happy years, and now they are - kaputt. i can't feel sorry at all, the boy had a good time and it did him no harm.
 
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It's sad that we live in a time when it's considered acceptable for a grown man to read comic books and collect toys.

I'm nearly 70. I started building model cars back when Ford went to LeMans in the 19 and 60's and never was able to break the habit.

You're gonna hate my 1/18 scale model car collection.
 
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"What’s sad about it? There’s nothing sad about the joy my kids get from my PIXAR Cars diecast collection..."

What a bullshit :-D. Who do u want to cheat, yourself? Rule nr. 1 Collections are not for children. Rule nr. 2 They can look but never touch. Already see how Father allows the child to play with his collection Schuco, Hotwheels, Dinky, Corgi or Tekno toy car like, Triumph 1800 (Black), Rolls Royce (Blue) or Hudson Commodore Sedan (Blue/Tan Upper). :-D Sorry for my English.
 
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