Help with finding untapped 58mm pcd to 70mm pcd adapters

LagunaSeca

100RPM
Original poster
May 8, 2018
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I read a couple of threads here and I believe I am posting at the right place. If not, my sincerest apologies and I will delete this post myself.

-Long story short: I want to find a 50.8mm to 70mm converter like the image shown below, but without tapped holes. I have searched for a long time on amazon and ebay. For every single converter/wheel spacer I saw, either the 70mm side is tapped or the 50.8mm side is tapped. I am getting a little desperate. (Even the adapters sold at leo bodnar and cube control's website are tapped at one side.)
racedep.jpg

-Why would I need something that weird?
I have recently been expanding my steering wheel collection. Bought some wheels from forum members (Hope I can show them soon.;)) and some from online store. One of them is the cube control formula pro, which has an tapped 50.8 pattern like below.
racedep2.jpg

I have an accuforce v2. Accuforce has 70mm QR. Then here is where the problem comes in. The ideal situation will be like this ("T" shaped things are bolts):
racedep3.png

Please be aware that most spacers on the market are tapped on one side and untapped on the other side.
Now with the adapter I showed at the beginning, I am going to have a problem:
racedep4.png

This one tiny details gave me a loooooot of headache. I searched for days and no avail. So there are several possible ways to solve this problem.
1. Open the wheel and change the converter.

Well this should be the standard way to do so. However, I watched Barry's review:


I realize that to get to the bolts I need to remove all the wiring and the PCB. I am afraid that I might hurt the components during the process. I don't think I am the most careful person out there.

2. Oh god just buy that goddamn tapped adapter and remove the tapping.
Ahh yes that was what first came into my mind. That adapter just costs me around 30 USD so in the worst case I will just throw 30 bucks into the water. But....How do I remove the tapping accurately? Maybe I can use a heavy duty drill but how can I point the drill perfectly perpendicular to the surface of the adapter? I guess I need some device in the factory.
racedep5.png

I don't think with the current consumer grade tools I have I will be able to hold 90 degrees from the start to end...:O_o:

So that should be the whole story. I would greatly appreciate it if you can give me some advice. I know I am currently in a dumb situation. I open to any criticism.
Any mocking, of course, if you cannot tolerate my stupidity in this thread.:unsure:
 

Richard Hessels

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Jul 23, 2008
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No heavy duty drill, it's only aluminium. Take a normal 5 mm steeldrill and a bit of oil (any oil) and gently and slowly let the drill sink trough the material. Don't push, the drill needs to do the work. Keep the drill straight.
The hole thats already there will take the path of least resistane (the middle), drilling your hole exactly in the centre.
When you use a bolts on one side, it's not a problem the hole is not perfectly straight.
As you secure the bolts they will straighten and be more than strong enough.
6x 5mm bolts are strong enough to lift a small car.
 
Last edited:

EsxPaul

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Feb 17, 2016
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I'd personally go for for option 2 and drill out the threading. I had the same scenario as you, where I had a SRM wheel adapter and a Sim Racing Coach QR, both of which were threaded. I decided to drill the QR as it was the more sacrificial of the two should something go wrong.

Most adapters are aluminium and very easy to drill. You don't really have to be super concerned about not being exactly 100% perpendicular. Just use common sense and line up your metal drillbit by eye or better still, use a drill press if you can get access to one through a friend or relative perhaps.

Check your bolt width size beforehand. It'll most likely be a M5 so you can start off with a 5mm drillbit (go nice and slow). If you feel that the threading has been removed, go on and check to see if your bolt now passes through the hole and if not, go up in size by 0.5mm on your drillbit.
 

Richard Hessels

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Jul 23, 2008
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I'd personally go for for option 2 and drill out the threading. I had the same scenario as you, where I had a SRM wheel adapter and a Sim Racing Coach QR, both of which were threaded. I decided to drill the QR as it was the more sacrificial of the two should something go wrong.

Most adapters are aluminium and very easy to drill. You don't really have to be super concerned about not being exactly 100% perpendicular. Just use common sense and line up your metal drillbit by eye or better still, use a drill press if you can get access to one through a friend or relative perhaps.

Check your bolt width size beforehand. It'll most likely be a M5 so you can start off with a 5mm drillbit (go nice and slow). If you feel that the threading has been removed, go on and check to see if your bolt now passes through the hole and if not, go up in size by 0.5mm on your drillbit.
Alumium is so soft, can even be drilled with a wood drill, sometimes that works een better than a metal dril.
 

LagunaSeca

100RPM
Original poster
May 8, 2018
104
77
No heavy duty drill, it's only aluminium. Take a normal 5 mm steeldrill and a bit of oil (any oil) and gently and slowly let the drill sink trough the material. Don't push, the drill needs to do the work. Keep the drill straight.
The hole thats already there will take the path of least resistane (the middle), drilling your hole exactly in the centre.
When you use a bolts on one side, it's not a problem the hole is not perfectly straight.
As you secure the bolts they will straighten and be more than strong enough.
6x 5mm bolts are strong enough to lift a small car.
Thanks a lot! I forgot how some aluminum is as a material. I will just use the olive oil I use for cooking then.:sneaky:
 

LagunaSeca

100RPM
Original poster
May 8, 2018
104
77
I'd personally go for for option 2 and drill out the threading. I had the same scenario as you, where I had a SRM wheel adapter and a Sim Racing Coach QR, both of which were threaded. I decided to drill the QR as it was the more sacrificial of the two should something go wrong.

Most adapters are aluminium and very easy to drill. You don't really have to be super concerned about not being exactly 100% perpendicular. Just use common sense and line up your metal drillbit by eye or better still, use a drill press if you can get access to one through a friend or relative perhaps.

Check your bolt width size beforehand. It'll most likely be a M5 so you can start off with a 5mm drillbit (go nice and slow). If you feel that the threading has been removed, go on and check to see if your bolt now passes through the hole and if not, go up in size by 0.5mm on your drillbit.
Yes. M5 it is. Most QRs use M5 and I got a lot of them. Good to see someone with the same problem and experience. Much obliged.
 

Richard Hessels

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Jul 23, 2008
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Thanks a lot! I forgot how some aluminum is as a material. I will just use the olive oil I use for cooking then.:sneaky:
If you have some problem with alignement of one or some of the 6 bolts, happens a lot.. than use a 5.5mm drill on the hole that's not exactly fit.
 

BenKay

100RPM
Jul 17, 2018
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I needed something exactly the same as you did....I bought the Leo Bodnar adaptor and modified it to suit.

I used simple hand reamer, and this worked fine to remove the threads in the aluminium. Took all of 5 minutes
 

LagunaSeca

100RPM
Original poster
May 8, 2018
104
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I needed something exactly the same as you did....I bought the Leo Bodnar adaptor and modified it to suit.

I used simple hand reamer, and this worked fine to remove the threads in the aluminium. Took all of 5 minutes
I guess I overestimated the difficulties of the task waaaaay too much.:geek:
 

BenKay

100RPM
Jul 17, 2018
146
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I guess I overestimated the difficulties of the task waaaaay too much.:geek:
Yep aluminium is very soft, easy to drill, and on the threaded holes, you're pretty much just shaving out the threads to leave the outer hole....like I said easy done with a hand reamer
 

BenKay

100RPM
Jul 17, 2018
146
42
36
Yep aluminium is very soft, easy to drill, and on the threaded holes, you're pretty much just shaving out the threads to leave the outer hole....like I said easy done with a hand reamer with the benefit that it's very difficult not to do it concentric to the old threaded hole
 

EsxPaul

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Feb 17, 2016
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This probably won't be needed in the case of aluminium but I've always used a tip I got from a friend who is into boat building...

He uses nothing but water as a lubricant when he is working on harder materials such a stainless steel. It doesn't get as hot as oil based lube and therefore keeps the drillbit temps lower.
 

LagunaSeca

100RPM
Original poster
May 8, 2018
104
77
This probably won't be needed in the case of aluminium but I've always used a tip I got from a friend who is into boat building...

He uses nothing but water as a lubricant when he is working on harder materials such a stainless steel. It doesn't get as hot as oil based lube and therefore keeps the drillbit temps lower.
Oh well damn, boat building sounds extremely fun............ Will use water then, few other things have heat capacity bigger than water.
 

diablo2112

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Dec 1, 2016
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285
Everyone is correct here. Just drill out the holes. Doesn't really have to be a precision job. If the bolt goes through, it will tighten up and not move. If you want to be super-careful, just use a reamer to widen each hole. This will keep it centered. Heck, any drill bit is going to self-center going through that hole, absolutely nothing to worry about here. Drill it and you're done.