Featured Give The DRM Revival’s Assetto Corsa Porsche 935 a Brake.

Discussion in 'Assetto Corsa' started by Tbear, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. Tbear

    Tbear
    Premium

    Messages:
    705
    Ratings:
    +468
    935 Brakes.jpg
    Give The DRM Revival’s Assetto Corsa Porsche 935 a Brake.


    This past week everybody’s attention got caught mightily with the long awaited release of the DRM Revival packet of cars. Love them or hate them, it seems everybody’s talking about them. I wasn’t among the immediate group of buyers, I waited a couple hours and kept an eye for posts exclaiming, “Cor Blimey … They’re Bleedin’ ‘ORRIBLE!!!”, but that post never came so I cued up and bought the set.

    It’s not like there weren’t any complaints. By the time I made my purchase, there was a growing body of folks disappointed with the mods, largely for two reasons, A) YA GOTTA PAY FOR IT?!?!? … and 2) The tires and brakes don’t work properly until you’ve warmed them up.

    I gave a bit of thought before I hit the pay now button, and then deleted the promo code that would have allowed me a discount as a Premium Member of RaceDepartment on the price. The biggest reason I did this was so I could have the freedom to speak my mind about these cars, the good or the bad, without being accused of being bought off. I simply want no part of the payware good – payware bad argument.

    The other reason I chose to pay full price is that a couple weeks ago a modder /track builder that frequents these hallowed halls just released a wonderful new version of an old US sports car race track. He’s got a growing body of work that I would call PROFESSIONAL QUALITY. Were he charging for it, I remember thinking to myself, I would gladly pay for this version of Watkins Glen simply based on his previous work … and to support and encourage modders to continue to create good content for Assetto Corsa, especially now that Kunos has left the picture.

    The warming up of brakes and tires is another matter entirely … and I think it defines the difference between a gamer and a racer.

    When the 934-935 Porsche s came out, I was working as a mechanic at a Porsche repair center and was following them in the media very closely. I knew that the consumer-grade 930 Turbo Carrera shared much of what Porsche put into its 934 and 935’s, except for the bits that came off of the 917. Over here in the US these Group 5 cars raced in IMSA’s Camel GT series, albeit with some minor modifications. Although they weren’t as loud as the Can-Am or Trans-Am cars I loved so much, these Group 5 cars were eye-watering, ground-pounding fast, fast, fast due, not only to the magic of turbocharging, but also to the massive 917 brakes that had been installed on them.

    Brumos 935.jpg
    To make comparisons, the 930 Turbo Carrera had a turbo about the size of both of one’s fists, the 934 started out with one about twice the size of stock, and by the time development of the 935 was done, they’d stuck TWO of them on the car. The street version 930 Turbo had very good brakes, certainly adequate for street or even on track use … but there was no way the stock units were going to stop, or even slow down, anything as remotely powerful as the Porsche 935 … so Porsche installed the brake assemblies for the 917 program … big 4-piston calipers, paired with cross-drilled cast iron rotors the size of Thanksgiving Turkey serving platters on all four corners, as seen in my horrible, faded and out of focus opening picture.

    The day I took that picture, I was roaming around the pits during a lunch break. I struck up a conversation with a mechanic on one of the 935’s that was on jack stands, and we started talking about the brakes. “Yeah” he said, “these brakes are the reason the cars can go so damn fast. By the way, that caliper and rotor cost over one thousand dollars!” I was dumb founded. The year was 1978 and back then a thousand bucks was a LOT of money. The shop I was working for had just installed a RUF turbo conversion kit into a 930 Turbo and the price tag for the work came to only $13,900 US, including the parts from RUF. Back then I was fairly blasé about Porsche’s prices for replacement parts, but a thousand dollars for a caliper and rotor really set me back … far enough that I took that picture, out of respect.

    To be sure, I never got the chance to drive a 934-935 Porsche. The street 930’s I drove were brutally fast, but as docile as kittens when driven around town. Clutch pedal effort was no different than the rest of the 911 variants, and the gearing and torque allowed them to be driven with nary a thought about what might happen if you pushed the accelerator pedal more than half down. I don’t recall any customer complaints with abnormally long stopping distances when the brakes were cold. I do remember that driving these cars taught me a lot about pedal application, that it had to be done smoothly, very, VERY smoothly or there was gonna be trouble. Also, the word on the street was that one should never lift off the accelerator in a corner when driving a Porsche 911. NEVER. And that went double in the 930. As an aside, I hope that every sim racer that tries these DRM cars will remember these words, especially when the tires and brakes are cold.

    I was racing my MGB by this time. Since I didn’t have Sims (or even computers) back then, and NO access to a track for practice or testing, I did most of that sort of thing on the street. I also had to apply those street-honed skills and whatever wisdom I found there to racing my car.

    By class rules, I had to have stock brakes on my MGB, but the choice of pads was open, so I was using Repco’s Metal Masters at the time. Brake pads having such a high metallic content at that time were deemed “for racing use only” due to fears of very high rotor wear (which I never experienced) and poor cold or wet performance, which I did experience. When I began using Goodyear Blue Streak racing slicks I did get caught out once with a first turn spin on cold tires. “Never Again!”, I pledged, and made sure that I warmed up both my tires and brakes sufficiently before I really began to push.

    I don’t know if it helps, but when driving these DRM Revival cars, I find myself pressing on the brake pedal on the straights to get some heat in pads and tires during my first lap, even in a race. I’d like to think it’s the racer in me. So far I’ve avoided trouble of the cold tire/brake kind.

    Now let’s see if I remember this rule coming out of the pits after the first pit stop of my first race in the wonderful Porsche 935 that DRM Revival has brought us.:confused:

    935s.jpg

    Interested in buying the DRM Revival mods? 17 versions of 10 fantastic Group 5 cars and enough skins for an entire racing series. Find it HERE

    A free Skins Pack updating those found on DRM’s release can be found HERE

    If you’d like to receive the 20% discounted price for DRM’s Revial, grab the promo code for premium members HERE


    Not a premium member yet? You can upgrade your account HERE

    Like what you see here at RaceDepartment? Don't forget to like, subscribe and follow us on social media!

    RaceDepartment YouTube
    RaceDepartment Twitter
    RaceDepartment Facebook
    RaceDepartment Twitch
    RaceDepartment Instagram

    Do you have any thoughts about the need to warm up tires and brakes on a simulated racing car? How about your own memories of these awesome Group 5/DRM/IMSA Camel GT cars? Why not share them below.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
    • Like Like x 41
    • Love Love x 27
    • Beer Beer x 11
    • Disagree Disagree x 2
  2. ronniej

    ronniej

    Ratings:
    +0
    Always loved these cars, the sounds and the looks....Didn't know much about "turbo lag" until my brother and his friends started to boost their Celica's, Civics, and RX-7's then chev 350 V8's etc and in the beginning, they weren't very smooth LOL. So, I can just imagine what it was like to harness these monsters on a track, and bring a whole new meaning to the phrase "brake fade"
     
    • Like Like x 5
  3. Leitcharound

    Leitcharound

    Messages:
    13
    Ratings:
    +7
    Thank you, excellent story with all that history you witnessed and I agree on the cold braking.
    Adds such a good dynamic and strategy to the first few laps, love that feeling holding everything back, as much as you want to start pushing it. Then when everything is all warmed up and you can just start to let loose. It's just so satisfying, authentic, engrossing and makes you such a better driver in the long run.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 3
  4. Richard Hessels

    Richard Hessels
    Premium

    Messages:
    1,031
    Ratings:
    +271
    But getting brakes hot even on a vintage car should not have to take more than a few corners.
    And it's not that you do not have brakes at all when they are cold, not as good as on their perfect temperature, braking a big car gets them hot quite quick.
    Many normal streetcars nowadays have similar steel brakes as the cars here, push them when they are cold they are still strong enough to get your face printed in the windscreen.
    Otherwise a emergency stop would be impossible. Nobody in a real car is warming up their brakes.
    Cold and new slick tires from the 80's that not have been scrubbed though...
    They are very tricky to race on the first lap.
    Combine those 2 and you could be in for a very messy first few laps.
    But the brakes should warm up quite rapidly, the tires take about 2 laps.
     
    • Agree Agree x 6
  5. Jens Roos

    Jens Roos
    Premium

    Messages:
    392
    Ratings:
    +643
    It's a big difference between streetcar/trackdays pads and actual race pads, it should be more the opposite that the brakes would fade after a corner or two on modern stock cars.

    Brake warmup, wobble at braking and the rather brute handling is rather well done within the limits of AC, look at this "high speed event" at Goodwood (youtube) and you can see how it wobbles during braking, wonderful :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
    • Beer Beer x 1
  6. Dave Slee

    Dave Slee
    Premium

    Messages:
    34
    Ratings:
    +19
    Great story Ted. I'm not sure why people are complaining about having to pay for this or any other mod that people have spent hundreds of hours on. Why do people feel so entitled these days? Stop going through the coffee shop drive threw for a couple of days would pay for it. Get over it people, all things in life aren't free so either pay for it or miss out on some great fun.
     
    • Agree Agree x 18
    • Disagree Disagree x 8
    • Like Like x 2
    • Haha Haha x 1
  7. sjb266

    sjb266

    Messages:
    479
    Ratings:
    +328
    Good read. Thanks for taking the time.. :thumbsup:
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Graham Botha

    Graham Botha

    Messages:
    279
    Ratings:
    +510
    Excellent article :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    935K3 @ Watkins Glen is probably the most fun you can have with your clothes on at the moment.
     
    • Haha Haha x 7
    • Like Like x 1
    • Beer Beer x 1
    • Disagree Disagree x 1
  9. Dirk Steffen

    Dirk Steffen
    Porsche Factory Jackass™ Premium

    Messages:
    1,494
    Ratings:
    +747
    Thanks for sharing this great story Ted!
    I hope you can share more - I love these history lessons, ESPECIALLY when they are Porsche related ;-)

    I do absolutely LOOOVE the DRM Revival mod for Assetto Corsa. Although it has it's issues (the German creators behind the mod have acknowledged this and have expressed that they were quite surprised by the initial onslaught of negative criticism regarding the 3D modeling of what everyone involved always considered a continuation project of the original rF1 mod rather than a complete reboot.
    They did express though that they are now collecting information and sorting through a to do list to plan updates and fixes to the issues expressed.

    To my surprise among the fixes are expressed that two of the old models were already in the process of receiving a complete rebuilt similar to their newer models in quality (the 935 '77 and BMW 320 Flachbau).

    I think we have a lot of wonderful racing material in the current mod to use and enjoy until updates and fixes will make the mod more polished.

    I enjoy it immensely as it is already, ESPECIALLY racing the 935 K3 around old circuits like the upcoming Racedepartment Riverside event this week !
     
    • Like Like x 7
    • Agree Agree x 2
  10. wombat999

    wombat999
    Premium

    Messages:
    512
    Ratings:
    +289
    Entertaing read indeed!
    Takes me way back to my own rookie racer days.
    People complaining about paying for a mod of this depth obviously have no comprehension of the amount of time and effort required, compared to the extremely expensive additions on the Flight Sim market this is loose change and worth every cent.
    I 'drove' the various releases of this series back on RF1 and always found it satisfying and highly entertaining.
    Currently I get to drive a variety of 911 versions, including some fierce Club Sport turbos, as a quartet of us 'Olde Phartes' have teamed up to buy insurance write offs for not a lot of money which we rebuild and (eventually) sell for a nice profit.
    Old habits die hard and I still do the 'warm up routine' on track and even on public roads..............:roflmao:.......something that my wife arcs up about when I do it in her BMW!
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Love Love x 2
  11. Canzy

    Canzy

    Messages:
    7
    Ratings:
    +4
    For anyone who has had the chance to drive a 1975 3.0 Litre 930 Turbo hard they are a weapon; and yes on track after 2 laps at Sandown or Philip Island you expect brake fade. 917 brakes need warming up, as do fat licorice strap tires - a mod that's authentic it sounds like
     
    • Like Like x 3
  12. pilot68

    pilot68
    Premium

    Messages:
    10
    Ratings:
    +12
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 10, 2018
    • Like Like x 4
    • Love Love x 1
  13. Greg Pugliese

    Greg Pugliese
    Premium

    Messages:
    99
    Ratings:
    +20
    Excellent post, thanks for sharing that. We sim-only racers need real-world reality checks once in a while. :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Haha Haha x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. MSKbeans

    MSKbeans

    Messages:
    70
    Ratings:
    +46
    I love these cars Heel n Toeing and getting it right . Awesome feeling. stopping distance just double your normal distance. I got 3 sims/ arcade with group 5 n this is up with the rest for quality. Nords n Capri. Awesome. Just need to figure out tracks to balance cars bit more. Also download the real names in downloads racedepartment, makes life easier to get the 1 you want to drive.
    Did few cars different tracks the variation in tyres is immense. I think little bit of work on tyres needed. Took around 4-5 laps for optimal feel. They cool too fast then overheat in seconds. I would try suspension settings to help the heat issue, but then the cars become wilder
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2018
    • Like Like x 1
    • Beer Beer x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. FlyGasm

    FlyGasm
    Shut Up and Race! Premium

    Messages:
    327
    Ratings:
    +152
    Awesome read dude! I'm also old school and owned a few muscle cars in those days. A '65 Chevelle Malibu, a '68 Nova and a '69 Camaro. I had many anal clenching adventures on the streets where the horsepower outweighed the stopping power and brake technology. In those days you'd put all your money into the engine and didn't think about how you were going to stop it. ;) Of course we got away with a lot of things in those days. Get pulled over for drinking and driving, and cops would just make ya pour it all out. Crazy times! :p
     
    • Love Love x 1
    • Beer Beer x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. Foresight

    Foresight

    Messages:
    15
    Ratings:
    +2
    thanks Ted to share your experience, grateful you do that ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. MSKbeans

    MSKbeans

    Messages:
    70
    Ratings:
    +46
    I was born in 66 the best year of all time. You know why ⚽. Cars had a brake pedal attached to elastic bands, over rev the engine and you heard the tell tale tinkle of broken piston's or valves. And the cambelt always decided to break at 5000 rpm so engine rebuild. Take care of these monsters when driving
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Andrew W

    Andrew W

    Messages:
    23
    Ratings:
    +9
    Is there anyone who DOESN'T warm brakes on the straights during an out lap? If so, why not and what type of car are you driving? Asking for a friend.
     
    • Haha Haha x 1
  19. Jens Roos

    Jens Roos
    Premium

    Messages:
    392
    Ratings:
    +643
    If you go into detail here, IF this was an real life scenario you would most likely do an formation lap before the standing start and during that, you would put some heat on the brakes and tires.

    But that is not possible in AC but can be done if doing an manual rolling start in multiplayer.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  20. Silvio Camolesi

    Silvio Camolesi
    Premium

    Messages:
    14
    Ratings:
    +8
    I bought it, I played it, I loved it. DRM + VR + Silverstone + 20 laps + a lot of AIs = an amazing single race!
    And I don't use any discount tickets too. The DRM team deserved my contribution.
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Agree Agree x 1
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.