Upcoming Events

Weekly BMW races on Simracing.GP Other regular AC events on Simracing.GP Weekly GT3 Sprint Races on Simracing.GP Rookie friendly WTCR sereis Weekly rFactor 2 events

Feedback wanted on 8020 dual purpose rig/workstation

Messages
1
Points
1
Don't have a lot of space so I'm trying to design a rig that can function as a workstation too. Features/Highlights:
  • Wheelbase mount/deck:
    • Wheelbase deck can slide back when not in use and is secured by 4 locking handles.
    • Current wheelbase mount is designed around the CSL DD but it should be pretty flexible for other wheelbases including my current CSW.
  • Monitor: Monitor will be mounted to gas spring arm from the back of the desk (currently doing this now and it works great).
  • Table Top: Designed the table top to use standard 2x12 lumber (3 x 28" long).
  • Seat:
    • Plan to use with a reclining seat so that I can tilt the seat up when working, back when sim racing.
    • Because most car seats have a rise in the front (making your thighs point slightly upward instead of horizontal like an office chair), I will likely need the seat closer to the floor than a normal office chair would be. Thus I will also make the table top lower than a normal desk. Plan to use seat risers though as I think the seat will need to be much higher than a normal sim rig.
    • Will use seat sliders to make it easier to get in/out of the rig when using it a workstation.
    • Obviously the car seat will not have arm wrests like a normal office chair so that is a slight risk to the ergonomics so I might try removing the arm rests from my current office chair for awhile to test it out.
  • Profile: 1.5 x 1.5" profile instead of 1.5 x 3 because I felt there are so much reinforcement in the top section (it's basically a box). I am slightly concerned about the 2 longest pieces but since I'll be in/out of the cockpit multiple times/day I thought a lower threshold to clear with my feet would be more convenient.

Thoughts/feedback? Thanks!


qN2oG9D.png

iW5g1Ba.png


ignqHPi.png
 
Messages
1,053
Points
2,113
It's a very clever design. I don't have an AP rig myself so I can't confidently comment on the structural side of things, but my gut feeling is that the 4 uprights are going to be supporting a lot of weight (wheel motor, pedals, desk, monitor + arm), so 1.5 x 3 may be better for those.

I also think an additional support would be needed at the back of the base, highlighted in red here:
1626014731396.png

(not based on AP experience or any engineering knowledge, just a feeling)

On ergonomics, the main thing is to make sure the desktop and wheel can both be at the correct height. Most people have the wheel motor tilted back rather than being horizontal, but that's down to personal preference (may be some ergonomic factor too). If the desktop is low enough to also rest your keyboard and mouse, it looks like the wheel could also be at the correct height. In my case, my desktop is quite high and is fine as a writing surface, with my keyboard and mouse on a sliding shelf below. With the wheel on the desk, it's necessary to raise my seat for that to feel right.

Here's a design I came up with a while ago for a dual purpose setup, with the motor permanently at the back with a shaft and support bearing: https://www.racedepartment.com/threads/foldable-aluminium-rig-suggestions.183028/page-2#post-3335307

Note that further down someone suggests using a sliding motor like in your design.

An idea for your arm rests: you could use some AP beams to support the arms from your current chair, with more quick-release brackets to allow them to fold away when driving.
 
Last edited:

stigs2cousin

Premium
Messages
592
Points
1,051
I am not convinced that you will find a position that allows you to work a full day at your desk without health issues.

A desk work space has completely different requirements than a drivers workspace.
Maybe research the health rules for office work.

If I can´t talk you out of it, here some ideas:
if your frame is not sturdy enough for a direkt drive just use profiles for triangulation.
I use a Simucube 2 pro (25nm) and Heusinkveld Sprints with very high settings on a DIY "spaceframe" rig with 40mm profiles quite similar to your design, that´s plenty rigid. Only difference to your design, I use a "cage" design for the long front to back profiles to avoid brake distortion. ( two profiles 100mm apart and connected to form a rectangular box)

Your design allows angle adjustment on a sidemount wheelbase, no problem there.

For your seat consider an used car seat:
they all have sliders for distance adjustment, many have hight adjustment.
The one I use pivots around the front mounting, in the upmost position the seat bottom is almost level to the ground. When adjusted down the bottom slants to rear.
Disadvantage: this seat would not be as rigid as a bucket seat, but I won´t spend a whole workday in a race seat.

MFG Carsten
 
Last edited:
Messages
27
Points
41
This is actually something I worked on recently and after three months using such rig for home office I am pretty satisfied - in general I have lower back issues since I was young, had other back pains when working in my company's office expensive chair as well. Since switching back to home office most of the pain disappeared, after switching to the new rig also my neck started feeling much better (I ride a lot of bike which puts it in awkward position, so maintaining neutral one while working was pretty important for me). Having dialed in seat and monitor height properly and being able to use pedals as feet support together with stepping on the ground proved very successful combination. The main points in achieving it was hybrid seat that can adjust back support and seat sliders so it can be moved back and forth.

I was also considering using normal seat as some of them have height adjustment, but really wanted a racing one so this is why I went the hybrid way. Using hybrid seats keeps my upper arms good support, so I do not exactly need arm rest any more. Also the keyboard tray has big degree of adjustments so it generally sits right above my legs - quite relaxed position.

Either way all is trial and error, as the people above said, you should find the proper body position for work and build around it the rig. In my case is easier as I prefer GT style one, which puts pedals lower and seat is more level.

You can check my thread HERE for further ideas.
 
Top