F1: Renault Disqualified From Suzuka - Don't Plan to Appeal

Renault F1 2.jpg

Having been disqualified from final results in Suzuka, Renault F1 have confirmed they don't wish to appeal the decision heading into the Mexican Grand Prix.


In a rather uncomfortable situation for the French manufacturer, following a 12-page document submitted by Racing Point during the Japanese Grand Prix race weekend, the FIA have taken the decision to disqualify the team from the final results at Suzuka for using what has been described as an 'illegal driving aid' - something that has been banned from the sport in a bid to ensure driver skill is not masked by technical trickery with modern F1 cars.

Although a subsequent investigation and evidence lodged by both parties came to the conclusion that the brake bias adjustment system didn't directly contravene the technical regulations of the sport, the FIA still adjudged the system to be a driver aid, which is against the current sporting regulations of Formula One.

Having reviewed the evidence following the Racing Point protest, the FIA has taken the decision to give Renault a slap on the wrist in the form of excluding the squad from their sixth and tenth placed finishes at Suzuka, adding more pressure on the French marque as they continue to fight for 'best of the rest' in the constructors championship this season.

Immediately following the ruling, Renault stated they would be considering their options heading to Mexico, however rather wisely the team have elected to offer no further appeal from the Japanese Grand Prix sanction.

The Renault statement in full:

We regret the Stewards' decision and, in particular, the severity of the sanction applied. In our opinion, the penalty is not proportionate to any benefit the drivers derived, especially when used within the context of a system confirmed fully legal and innovative. It is also inconsistent with previous sanctions for similar breaches, as acknowledged by the Stewards in their decision, but expressed without further argumentation. However, since we have no new evidence to bring other than that already produced to demonstrate the legality of our system, we do not wish to invest further time and effort in a sterile debate in front of the International Court of Appeal concerning the subjective appreciation, and therefore sanction, related to an aid that reduces the driver workload without enhancing the performance of the car. We have therefore decided not to appeal the Stewards’ decision. Formula One will always be an arena for the relentless search for the slightest possible opportunities for competitive advantage. It is what we have always done and will continue to do, albeit with stronger internal processes before innovative solutions are brought on track.

Renault F1.jpg


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RaceDepartment Editor-in-Chief, occasional YouTuber, commentator and broadcaster, with a passion for motorsport on both the real and virtual racetrack.
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BrunoB

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Oct 10, 2011
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I think it sounds very strange that this "automatic brake adjusting aid" at the same time is fully legal but anyway is punished by the stewards.
And the 2x disquals sounds pretty harsh IF(!) this feature is actually judged legal.:whistling:
 

Dennemark

1RPM
Dec 28, 2017
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So at what point are the FIA going to consider the front- and rear wings "driver aides"?
I mean, at what point is this mad hunt for "sport" going to end?
They're trying so hard but when a simple attention-saving shortcut is considered a driver aid, what else is a driver aid next season?
Honestly I'd almost expect a team to put one or both of their drivers out of the field without wings whatsoever just to signal good faith in the FIA's sense of "sporting competition". And to have a giggle. Unless of course a sense of humour isn't sporting.
 
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paracletus

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Dec 6, 2013
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A poster on here mentioned that there are a whole bunch of sneaky driver aids in current F1 cars; can't find any proof of that mind. Interesting.
 

NDG

Non Dangerous Guy
Aug 29, 2017
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Remove power steering and drink attachments etc. If you want to drink, you should bring a bottle and open it while driving. ~Thank you! I'm gonna get them!
 

wombat999

500RPM
Oct 11, 2015
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And where exactly did Team Stroll get their extensive information on this subject?
"A 12-page document submitted by Racing Point"........................:poop:
If it came from one of the reputable teams it might have a grain of truth to it but from this shifty lot?
Bloody muppets.
 

neuer31

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Oct 4, 2011
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I think it sounds very strange that this "automatic brake adjusting aid" at the same time is fully legal but anyway is punished by the stewards.
It is not fully legal, it violates the sporting code.
“The brake balance adjustment system in question acts as a driver aid, by saving the driver from having to make a number of adjustments during a lap.
[...]
The Stewards note that there is a clear distinction between this system and one which provides actual feedback control, which could be a substitute for driver skills or reflexes. Nevertheless, it is still an aid and, therefore, contravenes Article 27.1 FIA Formula One Sporting Regulations.”
 
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Mar 26, 2011
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Awkward, I remember watching one of those video describing the F1 steering wheel. Saying driver get 2 buttons/pedals on the back of the steering wheel. Press it to setup the car for the next corner (assuming brake bias, diff settings, etc)
 

BrunoB

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Oct 10, 2011
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It is not fully legal, it violates the sporting code.
“The brake balance adjustment system in question acts as a driver aid, by saving the driver from having to make a number of adjustments during a lap.
[...]
The Stewards note that there is a clear distinction between this system and one which provides actual feedback control, which could be a substitute for driver skills or reflexes. Nevertheless, it is still an aid and, therefore, contravenes Article 27.1 FIA Formula One Sporting Regulations.”
OK. So because of the missing "actual feedback control" its not (as I supposed) an "automatic brake adjusting aid" - that "could be a substitute for driver skills or reflexes".
Hehe but because it probably "saves the driver from some workload" it is still considered as some kind of driving aid.
Where are Renaults advocates when they are needed?:roflmao:
 

Terry Rock

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Oct 24, 2009
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So you can be in compliance with F1's technical regulations but be in breach of the sporting regulation.....Got it!
If that isn't the biggest load of 'lawyer-speak' and :poop:, I don't know what is.
Compliance with technical regulation suggest it is legally accepted for use with current hardware and within the confines of the design and operation.
A breach of sporting regulation does not allow any wiggle room for physical implementation...on any part of the car.
It is either legal or it is not in my world.
 
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Antony Snook

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Jul 16, 2011
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This is the way of F1. When you are a struggling team you will bend any rule you can to mouve forwards.
Back in 90's a driver Named Phillepe Alliot went to a press conference and asked why whey could not put traction control on his Larousse race car like in testing. Not realizing it was band. He lost the drive for ratting out the teams secret to qualifying performance.:D:roflmao::D:roflmao:
 

Ross Garland

Spiritseer
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Sep 28, 2009
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Solution? Remove all the shite that allows any kind of adjustments from the cockpit, pit wall, or onboard computer. No diff tweaks, no bias changes, no "party mode", etc etc. You set up your car as best you can before the race, and then you stick with it until the race is over. Job done.