F1 2020 | Check Out A Lap At The Monaco Grand Prix Circuit In F1 2020

JonnyCombat

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Feb 22, 2018
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I must admit that the F1 games are a guilty pleasure of mine. I'm just a sucker for a decent career mode which nearly every other racing game fails at (I'm also one of those mutants that loves the career mode in the NHL games and FIFA).

I like setting up full race seasons on Assetto but I love the ebb and flow of the F1 season when you're running it. I know it's not a hardcore super duper sim, and yes I get equally frustrated with the lack of feedback when a curb flings me off seemingly for no reason other than it hates me, but for the most I do enjoy the racing.

Feel free to berate me, I deserve it for being a filthy F1 loving normy.
 
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AusWillis

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Dec 15, 2017
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I will buy it, play the career and DNF at Monaco each season as I despise that track, love Baku and Singapore .. go figure.

VR could not care one way or the other, let you lot fight over that, when it is cheap enough that it fits into the average household disposable income budget then it will go ahead and be a mainstream thing.

Right now I love ACC, the feeling of being in the cockpit with the sounds and enviroment is very cool, also liking RF2 for the WEC side of things,
 

HoiHman

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Did i see correct that Codemasters has "upgraded" every car to exactly the same steering wheel :(
 

John-Eric Saxén

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While codies F1 games certainly aren't "hardcore sim" and they certainly have unrealistic and strange aspects of physics, they also often drive better at/over the limit than hardcore sims. I still only own F1 2017 (so not sure about 2018 - 2020) and I'm able to power out of corners while being in control and modulating the rear-end angle of the vehicle as well as the wheelspin myself and it often eerily reminds me of, both, my real-life racing experience as well as watching oversteer angle & wheelspin control in real-life racing (including F1 itself). While other sims act extremely on/off in those situations as if your only option is to either not spin or spin but there's no in-between where you're actual in control of the vehicle.
The problem with Codemasters is that it's too forgiving, especially F1 2017, they improved a bit on this with F1 2019. In F1 2017 I had a moment where I went sideways through Pouhon and the car never fully lost control, all tires just kept in a perpetual 40 degree slip angle angle state until the car lost so much speed that it naturally recovered. Ultimately you lose lap time by doing that of course, but it's still wrong, the car shouldn't be controllably sideways at 300 km/h. Real life F1 is pretty much the opposite of this. The last couple of years, F1 cars became extremely on/off in terms of grip. I haven't seen a single onboard where a driver goes over the limit and correcting consistently like Schumacher used to do, it's all about precision now. Vettel is a good example with his 10 or so spins over the last couple of years. There is simply very little margin with current Pirelli tires once you go above the limit.
 

Slapped

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Oct 2, 2019
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The problem with Codemasters is that it's too forgiving, especially F1 2017, they improved a bit on this with F1 2019. In F1 2017 I had a moment where I went sideways through Pouhon and the car never fully lost control, all tires just kept in a perpetual 40 degree slip angle angle state until the car lost so much speed that it naturally recovered. Ultimately you lose lap time by doing that of course, but it's still wrong, the car shouldn't be controllably sideways at 300 km/h. Real life F1 is pretty much the opposite of this. The last couple of years, F1 cars became extremely on/off in terms of grip. I haven't seen a single onboard where a driver goes over the limit and correcting consistently like Schumacher used to do, it's all about precision now. Vettel is a good example with his 10 or so spins over the last couple of years. There is simply very little margin with current Pirelli tires once you go above the limit.
OK, I think everybody agrees that the physics are off in the F1 games, but honestly when you have F1 drivers slating F1 2019 for various reasons including physics, and also saying that it's like driving on ice (Nico Hulkenberg stated that) then I don't buy into this statement of yours that F1 2017 is too forgiving.

Honestly if real cars behaved the way a lot of sim racers seem to want them to in sims then Sainsbury's car park would be wreckfest, assuming people made it there alive in the first place.
 

Spinelli

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Jan 22, 2014
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The problem with Codemasters is that it's too forgiving, especially F1 2017, they improved a bit on this with F1 2019. In F1 2017 I had a moment where I went sideways through Pouhon and the car never fully lost control, all tires just kept in a perpetual 40 degree slip angle angle state until the car lost so much speed that it naturally recovered. Ultimately you lose lap time by doing that of course, but it's still wrong, the car shouldn't be controllably sideways at 300 km/h.
Ya, there's always going to moments in all games/sims that are unrealistic, unnatural, just plain wrong, etc. Having said that, the situation you described is such an exteme case and you've already lost so much time + it's not part of regular lapping that I can look past those moments. Things that are always happening throughout the lap (like general wheelspin and oversteer control out of corners, etc.) is more important to me. If I had to choose, I personally wouldn't want general lapping/driving physics to get compromised in order to try and improve extreme case scenarios.

Real life F1 is pretty much the opposite of this. The last couple of years, F1 cars became extremely on/off in terms of grip. I haven't seen a single onboard where a driver goes over the limit and correcting consistently like Schumacher used to do, it's all about precision now. Vettel is a good example with his 10 or so spins over the last couple of years. There is simply very little margin with current Pirelli tires once you go above the limit.
Yes, the 2017+ cars are more snappy but they're not on/off. Look at Bottas here:


...he get's sideways then what he does is boots the throttle, this gives a spike in power (the last thing you'd want to do in a hardcore sim) but also squats the rear down then, from the increased oversteer he created from booting the throttle down he then slightly lessens the throttle but still keeps a fair amount in order to keep the wheelspin going - he's modulating the wheelspin and oversteer angle through throttle & wheel modulation -, then on exit he re-plants the throttle even harder (something, again, you don't want to do often in hardcore sims or the car will often freak out). The whole time, he has the wheel spinning (sometimes less, sometimes more as can be heard as well as seen from how dark the black lines of rubber are).

The entire time he has oversteer and wheelspin but there are 3 of 4 different segments to the slide where he's either increasing the angle and wheelspin or reducing it (but still maintaining). The wheelspin, oversteer angle, and vehicle as a whole is always 100% responding to the driver's input - the driver is in control during all portions of wheelspin and oversteer.

I've seen millions of moments like this or similar in F1 from 2017 onwards. You just don't see it much because cars loose too much time nowadays and, to make things worse, tyres are so ridiculously heat sensitive (not even wear-sensitive but just heat sensitive). You're right though, they're not as forgiving as pre-2017 cars but they're still nothing like most sims.

Most sims, once the car breaks traction, if you go apply more throttle then the wheelspin and engine revs will often freak-out and spike as if you suddenly applied a million horsepower or as if a thousand PSI of boost just kicked in. Sometimes I think it's not only due to the tyre model but also due to other aspects of the phsyics engine and also the way power/torque responds according to load on the tyres and pedal input. It's like, once there's some slip going on, the power output of the vehicle's motor crazily spikes, or, once some slip goes on, it's like the surface of the road changes to an incredibly low friction surface (like glass or something).
 
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Leonardo Chaves

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Oct 11, 2010
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Codemasters physics don't feel stiff, edgy and "on the nose" like F1 cars in other sims, Esteban Gutierrez described it best when he said it feels "mushy".
Even simple reactions feel lethargic to me, like i turn the wheel and the car chooses to acknowledge a second later...

It's not necessarily easier either, some times i get thrown off and it's like "WTF was that?".
Things i can't predict or see happening because usually the cars in F1 20XX can take a lot of abuse, but then without warning there's some threshold were it's too hard, too aggressive.

When i spin in AC, RF2, AMS i know exactly where stuff went sideways...
 
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Trebor901

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Changing the subject from all this whining......Where is Martin Brundle in these games in the UK? Its bugged me for a while now. We've got David Croft and for some reason Anthony Davidson too after the race but Martin Brundle has never been included in any of them. Bit odd when lets face it he is the voice of F1 in the UK.
 

Mike nolan 1985

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May 13, 2020
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i know this is a pre release vid but does anyone else feel the graphics and the game has not really taken a step up for the past few years? other than new tracks and cars etc obviously, the actual game play seems to be the same.
 

Spinelli

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I can't remember if it was 2018 or 2019 that took quite a step up, albeit mostly due to post-processing tuning & trickery rather than fundamental graphics engine changes but, ya, def a step up if you count that.

There's only so much you can do fundamentally because the hardware of the consoles is the same for around 7 years now and these games are 90% designed for consoles unfortunately.

The next step up will be when the new consoles come out and probably again 2-4 years after that when they've learned how to get more out of the consoles and software.