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DIY 8020 or Prebuilt?

Let me also explain machining, which is always a bit tricky to understand. I will be using the names by Motedis. When you order your profiles, you can order them without machining (for instance, when you will be using only brackets), with the M12 machining (not very common, consists in a threaded hole on the inside of the profile, D17 and D17V). The diference between D17 and D17V only affects wide profiles, such as for instance 45x90. For symmetrical profiles such as 45x45, D17 and D17V are the same because you can always rotate the profile when installing it. In the case of wide profiles, D17V is normally the kind of machining you want, because it means the hole will be in the 45 sides. Remember that you will have to specify if you want machining in one end or in both ends. For instance, for the base frame, you will use machining on both ends for the front and rear profiles. For the columns, you only need machining on one end (where they attach to the base). Now, when ordering the quick connectors, T-connectors or whatever they are called, you have to pay attention to how the profiles will connect. You can find 2 types of connectors: 0° and 90°. If you are in dobut, you can also order some bags of each type, hehe. Finally remember that machining is only for the case in which the end of the profiles touches other profile. It doesn't work for this kind of installation (see photo), where you will need brackets.

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Is the machining you're talking about the same as "tapping"? I've seen tapping mentioned before on the end of profiles. I haven't looked too much into any machining or tapping. I thought everything just connected with brackets.

Is it any spots where the end of the profile meets another profile you need to have machined? Or is it just an extra add on for more durability?
 
I said "machining" because it's the term you find when ordering profiles at Motedis. Obviously, profiles to not stay together with magic, so that's the way to build structures. It makes very strong joints, but brackets are strong too, and you can use both methods together in some cases if there's not any interference between them.
 

Mr Latte

Premium
Simlabs has become like the "must buy" rig platform or so it seems with just about everyone these days buying or copying one.

Yet I think with some creativity you can go beyond a basic rectangle. Yeah sure while functional, strong, adaptable and it does all that but man as design, (for me at least) it is a bit dull. Some on the forums have done their own improvements which I think is good and we all have our own ideas or interests with a rig build in what we want it to achieve.
 
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Why use fasteners that require machining? This basically defeats the main advantage of 8020: the ability to reconfigure at will. Drilling large holes just weakens the extrusions, and those fasteners don't look particularly robust or strong. Anyone that's assembled Ikea furniture can tell you how robust twist turn fasteners are.

Angle brackets are dirt cheap: less than $1/ea off Amazon. They're strong, and you can reassemble anytime you want. Not trying to be difficult, just wondering why you'd greatly increase the complexity, require machining of your parts leaving huge (ugly?) holes everywhere, get a weaker connection, and kill your ability to reconfigure your rig. What's the advantage here for you?
 
Why use fasteners that require machining? This basically defeats the main advantage of 8020: the ability to reconfigure at will. Drilling large holes just weakens the extrusions, and those fasteners don't look particularly robust or strong. Anyone that's assembled Ikea furniture can tell you how robust twist turn fasteners are.

Angle brackets are dirt cheap: less than $1/ea off Amazon. They're strong, and you can reassemble anytime you want. Not trying to be difficult, just wondering why you'd greatly increase the complexity, require machining of your parts leaving huge (ugly?) holes everywhere, get a weaker connection, and kill your ability to reconfigure your rig. What's the advantage here for you?

Is this an example of the angle brackets you're talking about on amazon? Amazon Angle Bracket

I found a lot of 2020 brackets and screws together but not as many 4040 brackets.
 
Why use fasteners that require machining? This basically defeats the main advantage of 8020: the ability to reconfigure at will. Drilling large holes just weakens the extrusions, and those fasteners don't look particularly robust or strong. Anyone that's assembled Ikea furniture can tell you how robust twist turn fasteners are.

Angle brackets are dirt cheap: less than $1/ea off Amazon. They're strong, and you can reassemble anytime you want. Not trying to be difficult, just wondering why you'd greatly increase the complexity, require machining of your parts leaving huge (ugly?) holes everywhere, get a weaker connection, and kill your ability to reconfigure your rig. What's the advantage here for you?
Totally agree here. Never heard of anyone machining through profile. You get the profile, buy some, angle brackets, bolts and t-slots and away you go.
I'll have to post some pics of my rig. Literally scribbled the design on a piece of paper and then took some measurements. Fits me perfectly and extremely ridged. No machining required, and I can move stuff around at will.
 
Is this an example of the angle brackets you're talking about on amazon? Amazon Angle Bracket

I found a lot of 2020 brackets and screws together but not as many 4040 brackets.

Yes. I've used those, and these in black. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07P7848BJ

For extra-strong bracing, you can use this double-high bracket. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01GNW7AJW

Finally, here's a different, strong corner brace you may prefer https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H51GKFU

With these, you'll want lots and lots of 8x16 and 8x20mm socket head cap screws (buy a couple of 100-piece boxes) and t-slot nuts. You can find either (for 40 series, 8mm) readily on Amazon.
 
I used the flat L brackets on the bottom four corners of my rig, along with the standard corner pieces.

Nice to have connectors working in different planes — plus it aligned the bottom pieces perfectly flat. Those were the first connectors to be used.

It’s worth considering the order in which you torque everything down to be sure pieces are aligned and butted up against other pieces. Use gravity to your advantage etc

The extra height brackets are good for the wheel deck uprights as they provide more support. Also just looks better and more in proportion. Annoyingly I forgot those out of my order when I built mine.
 
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