Upcoming Events

Join TCR Virtual today! AC events on Simracing.GP ACC events on Simracing.GP Weekly rFactor 2 events

What racing gear do you use while sim racing?

  • Gloves

    Votes: 269 19.5%
  • Boots

    Votes: 60 4.3%
  • Gloves + Boots

    Votes: 137 9.9%
  • None

    Votes: 917 66.3%

Trying a £50k Motion Rig - Motion Simulation TL3 | World In Motion EP1


I have always had a love hate relationship with motion rigs. I love the way they look but hated the time it takes to adjust to the motion effects. Whenever I have jumped into a motion rig in the past I have always struggled to get on my usual albeit rather slow pace. So I have made it my mission to understand the world of motion sims. Introducing a new series, World In Motion.

In this new series I aim to learn about the differences between the different forms of motion sims and what the benefits are of each. There are so many approaches to motion simulation and quite frankly every manufacturer I speak to tells me that they do it right and all the others are doing it wrong. I intend to figure out for myself which kind of motion simulation I prefer and why.

The mission is to try as many motion sims as possible by visiting manufacturers, invited by existing users or even trying in my own home. And that brings us to episode 1, Motion Simulation TL3. I took a trip (at my expense) to Motion Simulation at the Veloce Esports HQ in London to give their Motion Rig a try.

The TL3 uses a D-Box Platform with three axis of motion: Pitch, roll and heave working in conjunction with other immersive elements such as the G-Harness which simulates brake pressure. All of these elements are matched closely to on screen visuals which i'm told is essential to provide an authentic experience and minimise any motion sickness.

I tried three different car & track combos and all three were a hell of a lot of fun with my pick of the bunch being ACC, probably because I had other cars on track and the immersion level was insane. The TL3 has a 200 degree wrap around screen powered by three Benq projectors. This meant you can look either side as cars pass you by, a lot like what you find with VR but in my case without the motion sickness.

Please watch the video for my thoughts on the TL3 and check out the Motion Simulation website for more information - https://www.motionsimulation.com/tl-series

While I was at Veloce HQ Johnathan from Motion Simulation allowed me to try their new consumer focused rig the LC series which carries a lot of the features over from the TL3 Cockpit such as the adjustable seating position and adjustable wheel position. It also can be upgraded to become a motion rig if you so desired. For those looking for extremely quick adjustable seating positions this cockpit with worth checking out.

For more information on the LC Series. check out the website here - https://www.motionsimulation.com/lc-series

The video format is quite different for me as I was out of the office and on location so please feel free to feedback what you thought of this style of video and help me improve the format over the course of the series.
About author
Steve Worrell
A motorsport fanatic and sim racer for over 20 years. Content creator for RD, and MD at Simracing.gp. Favourite sims include ACC, AC, RF2, AMS, WRC9 - VernWozza#7419 @vernwozza

Comments

Fantastic video, really interesting subject matter and I'll look forward to all the others in the series! On the presentation side of things, this is excellent, it's polished, slick and it's very engaging - much like your previous videos. You're a great presenter Steve, you convey a sense of fun with a sense of purpose, which is a difficult balance to achieve.
 
"One of the reasons we go quite high on the torque on the steering is because in a real race car you're bracing yourself with the steering wheel against sustained G, so we think by increasing the force over what would be a direct 1:1, it replicates you holding on to the steering wheel like you are going around the corners."
This is a perfect explanation of my own approach to static simracing.
I've always liked my FFB to be quite strong because without motion I don't feel connected to the car.
If the forces are weak, I start loosing my focus and I'm getting the impression I'm just driving the moving pixels with my gear. And that completely drains out the enjoyment/realism factor.
That's why I mainly drive group C and vintage F1 cars. I wanna be challenged physically.
 
"One of the reasons we go quite high on the torque on the steering is because in a real race car you're bracing yourself with the steering wheel against sustained G, so we think by increasing the force over what would be a direct 1:1, it replicates you holding on to the steering wheel like you are going around the corners."
This is a perfect explanation of my own approach to static simracing.
I've always liked my FFB to be quite strong because without motion I don't feel connected to the car.
If the forces are weak, I start loosing my focus and I'm getting the impression I'm just driving the moving pixels with my gear. And that completely drains out the enjoyment/realism factor.
That's why I mainly drive group C and vintage F1 cars. I wanna be challenged physically.
Do bear in mind that no consumer DD wheel right now will replicate even sustained torques for Group C/old F1, let alone peaks. Not really an issue for modern GT cars though.
 
Do bear in mind that no consumer DD wheel right now will replicate even sustained torques for Group C/old F1, let alone peaks. Not really an issue for modern GT cars though.
Sorry dont agree with you there. We are fortunate enough to have a lot of experience in real race cars with true downforce and slicks as well as real racing drivers using our products. There is more than enough torque in the simcube 2. If we run a Mclaren Senna spec from the early 90's on rF2 we can achieve HUGE torque but it quickly becomes unusable. The key here is an appropriate balance and (we believe) replicating muscle memory from sustained G as mentioned - caused when experiencing real G you are constantly bracing yourself between the contact points - that being the steering wheel and seat. Thats why our normal FFB settings seem crazy high for those not used to both - though we accept that point is subjective and a personal proference matter.
 
Fantastic video, really interesting subject matter and I'll look forward to all the others in the series! On the presentation side of things, this is excellent, it's polished, slick and it's very engaging - much like your previous videos. You're a great presenter Steve, you convey a sense of fun with a sense of purpose, which is a difficult balance to achieve.
Yes agree. Steve has a real talent. Genuine new angle, perspective and style. We appreciate his work and approach to content - though we are still trying to get over what he looked like in the Chelsea kit...
 
Sorry dont agree with you there. We are fortunate enough to have a lot of experience in real race cars with true downforce and slicks as well as real racing drivers using our products. There is more than enough torque in the simcube 2. If we run a Mclaren Senna spec from the early 90's on rF2 we can achieve HUGE torque but it quickly becomes unusable. The key here is an appropriate balance and (we believe) replicating muscle memory from sustained G as mentioned - caused when experiencing real G you are constantly bracing yourself between the contact points - that being the steering wheel and seat. Thats why our normal FFB settings seem crazy high for those not used to both - though we accept that point is subjective and a personal proference matter.
Simucube 2 is capable of 30Nm+? What sustained torque are you getting out of the Mclaren? Are you even calculating it/correlating to telemetry or do you just assume your torques are correct for that type of car?
 
Simucube 2 is capable of 30Nm+? What sustained torque are you getting out of the Mclaren? Are you even calculating it/correlating to telemetry or do you just assume your torques are correct for that type of car?
Regrettably we dont have a 90s McLaren to hand. Telemetry from software has its issues with spikes which you wouldnt want and anomolies through simulated components. We take a balanced judgement from data and driver feedback
 
Yeah, great video Steve! (I usually can't bring myself to watch anything longer than about 8 minutes :p)
You didn't really keep Johnathan guessing about whether or not you were impressed with the product ;) but to be honest I was pretty impressed myself.
When you hit those kerbs at Zolder I was suddenly reminded that hitting kerbs in real life with little or no suspension travel actually hurts - easy to forget that as a sim racer. In a long stint, I wonder if the kicks from a motion rig (gear change, kerbs, etc.) might actually start to become unpleasant. However, I'm probably never going to have to deal with that issue :roflmao:
 

Article information

Author
Steve Worrell
Views
6,904
Comments
41
Last update

Share this article

Top