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  • Yes

    Votes: 140 37.0%
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How not to rage quit | Content collaboration - Introducing Ben Harrison - La Broca Sim Racing

Have you ever rage quit a league race?

  • Yes - I'm a terrible person

    Votes: 55 28.5%
  • No - I'm a saint

    Votes: 106 54.9%
  • Yes but... - I had genuine reason (tell us below what happened)

    Votes: 32 16.6%

  • Total voters
    193

Let's face it we've all been there, we've all rage quit at least once. It's a horrible feeling when you put a ton of practice into a race just to be punted at T1. I must admit, the red mist descends on me pretty hard so any help I can get to prevent me from hitting that little ESC button is greatly appreciated.

Thankfully our new friend Ben Harrison is at hand to help us work through some of those anger issues. If you're not familiar with Ben he has a fantastic YouTube channel dedicated to sim racing. One of the areas Ben has focused on for his content is improving as sim racer and this includes tacking issues such as learning how to overtake skilfully, avoiding common mistakes and in his latest video, rage quitting.

Ben makes a great point in this video about why it's not only respectful to your fellow competitors to continue where you still can but also, while your optimal finishing position may have been compromised, there is still fun to be had working your way back through the field.

It's not always easy to regain composure after an incident, penalty or self inflicted trips to the barriers but it makes you appreciate how the pros both in the real world and sim world manage to block out the issue and focus at getting back on track. It's something that I wish I was better at and I will try and take Ben's advice in the future and look for the positives and enjoy the rest of the race.

This is the first in a series of videos we will be doing with Ben. If you liked this content collaboration please help Ben's Channel grow by dropping a like on his video and subscribing for more tips on how to improve as a sim racer.
About author
Steve Worrell
A motorsport fanatic and sim racer for over 20 years. Content creator for RD, and MD at Simracing.gp. Favourite sims include ACC, AC, RF2, AMS, WRC9 - VernWozza#7419 @vernwozza

Comments

There were time I've been forced to quit, such as engine/suspension broken, disconnections and such. You know, common occurrencies.
I was more enraged by quitting under those conditions than getting involved in an accident with some other racer(s).

Regards.

Ricardo V. Soares
 
chalk me up as a saint: in 18 years of playing racing games, running a league, commenting on leagues, being a beta tester, whatever, i do not think i ever rage quit. then again, i might just be whitewashing my memories on a regular basis. seriously, though, i have never gotten beyond the "just a game" attitude and why would one really get mad at a computer game / in a computer game? i have been known to throw my tennis racket into the net and kick a soccer ball up in the air in frustration, so i am capable of some emotion, but acting this out sitting in front of a screen? not my thing. just the other day i was punted off in a league race by a chap running in another division / class AND being a lap down. did i enjoy the moment? decidedly not. did i flame him afterwards (mindful of the "no chat" rule in my league). well, of course not. i never met the guy and never looked him in the eye, so how can i really interact with him?
 
chalk me up as a saint: in 18 years of playing racing games, running a league, commenting on leagues, being a beta tester, whatever, i do not think i ever rage quit. then again, i might just be whitewashing my memories on a regular basis. seriously, though, i have never gotten beyond the "just a game" attitude and why would one really get mad at a computer game / in a computer game? i have been known to throw my tennis racket into the net and kick a soccer ball up in the air in frustration, so i am capable of some emotion, but acting this out sitting in front of a screen? not my thing. just the other day i was punted off in a league race by a chap running in another division / class AND being a lap down. did i enjoy the moment? decidedly not. did i flame him afterwards (mindful of the "no chat" rule in my league). well, of course not. i never met the guy and never looked him in the eye, so how can i really interact with him?
The thing is Eckhart...You actually are a saint.
 
Only time I ever "rage quit" was due to technical issues. Game had started lagging, and I was losing positions left, right and center. Eventually I couldn't deal with it anymore, pulled the car into the pit lane and quit. Apart from that, never see much reason in rage quitting.
 
The last time I genuinely ragequitted from a race was actually my first time getting into an online race in ACC. In Monza, no less.

Started pretty high up at 4th, got punted after someone forgot to hit the brakes turning into Ascari in the first lap. Found out later that it was by the same person who thought that I'd mess everyone's race up by sending it into turn 1, which I didn't do.

Fun times :rolleyes: have never ragequitted ever since though.
 
I've rage quit a few times. It is usually my fault in the incidents and I get so frustrated at myself and don't want the other drivers to see me. So rage quitting is more of a runaway than anything else. It never happens when others cause the incidents, just when I do them. I have a real bad habit of taking it out on myself for even the slightest incidents.
 
I do actually leave but only when the car stops moving after someone wrecks it
 
I've rage quit against the AI or just in hot lapping plenty, but only once against human competition. It was actually very recent. I was in iRacing and, for about the 15,000th time, I got rear ended by some muppet who would rather rear end me than wait a couple corners to setup a clean pass. Wrecked me, had to pit. I *always* go back out and finish the race, but I just didn't have the stomach for it. Peace out.
 
Long long time ago in a far far away ....
Eeeem ...2008 Formula1 rFactor League.
I was a Medium driver who had to practice 2h a day to keep Up hoping for points. This time me and my teammate prepared almost 4h per day for the Spa GP. It resulted in double pole. Starting second place I already overtook my partner in the first corner. Following my first ever leading kilometers. Being so nervous and excited I forgot a corner and bounced a wall. I damaged my nose - instant quit.
 
I've never quit a race. Even if I make a big mistake and end up in last place, I finish the race. That's just part of the game. You don't learn and you don't get better if you rage quit every time there's a problem. Take a deep breath, focus and concentrate and move on.
 
Because you never know what all can happen in a race, i don't give up.
I had league races, where i was last after a first lap accident and with a huge gap to the rest of the field. But with consistant laptimes and no mistakes it was possible to finish these races in the Top10 or at least Top15. A rage quit is not an option for me.
 
The only time, very rarely, I have quit have been when I've been so upset about something that I've felt I might just make life more difficult for others by staying out there. It's usually a sign that I need to take a break anyway. I need a positive mindset to do well, and the last thing I want is to be a lap down and cause unnecessary incidents. But if it's just bad luck on lap 1, nothing intentional on anyone's part, I will stay out there fighting for 16th position, and heeding blue flags the best I can. That way I can leave the race feeling positive about it. It's all a learning experience, and every time damage ruins my chances to fight for better positions, I try to analyze the incident. I don't try to change other people's driving. There's a lot you can do to avoid incidents, whether they be your fault or not and it's sometimes just as important as being fast.
 

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