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Assetto Corsa Competizione v1.8 Update


Assetto Corsa Competizione has been updated to version 1.8. In this multi-page article we are taking a look at the updates to the content, gameplay experience, significant physics updates and the graphics and user unterface.

Kunos Simulazioni has released version 1.8 of Assetto Corsa Competizione. The update is extensive and affects most aspects of your experience playing the SRO simulator.

New content is generally what grabs the attention of sim racers, so this is where we’ll start with our look at the update. The Lamborghini Super Trofeo EVO2 may be joining the sim soon along with the BMW M2 CS, but for now players will need to be content with the BMW M4 GT3. Kunos has been discussing this addition since August but have exceeded their own timeline in bringing it to us.

To complement and integrate the M4 GT3, Kunos has given us the 2021 GT World Challenge Europe season including all liveries and drivers. For those not content to race a single series, Kunos has created a new way to race: Open series. The Open mode allows you to combine various classes of cars, including ST and Porsche Cup with GT3 and GT4.

Another major update affecting gameplay is revised weather logic. Variability now has a greater effect on weather swings and durations.

The changelog pertaining to gameplay and content is below, and look for more coverage of the big 1.8 update here at RaceDepartment.
  • Updated project to Unreal Engine version 4.26.2.
  • Added Fanatec GT World Challenge Europe 2021 season as bonus content with all entries, liveries and drivers and championship season (certain entries subject to DLC ownership)
  • Added all-new BMW M4 GT3 as bonus content as part of the 2021 season.
  • Added Open season, merging all game content into a "sandbox" season featuring grid customization.
  • Added opponent grid mixing option to Custom Race Weekend and Quick Race game modes in the Open season.
    • Use the grid mixing sliders to set car group prevalence in the grid.
    • GT3 car group has an additional setting for preferred generation of opponent cars (all, pre-2019 or new-gen).
  • Added Open series championship mode with grid (car groups) and track lineup customization.
  • Fixed multiclass championships not splitting points per car groups.
  • Automatically generated custom cars are now grouped into teams both in single-make custom mode and Open series championship.
  • Reworked driver assignment system to support custom-generated grids and various driver count requirements.
  • Standardized entry and team ID system across the whole game content in support of the Open series grid generation and championship.
  • Removed entry duplication between the 2019 GTWCH and IGT seasons.
  • Fixed potential rule inconsistencies between official sprint and endurance game modes when played via Single Player and Championship.
  • This also fixes inconsistent auto-selection behaviour of the MFD in these sessions depending on game mode.
  • Tweaked AI logic for strategic decisions reacting to weather changes.
  • Fixed a potential issue with AI pitstop status when loading a saved game, causing cars to DNF.
  • Improved weather model: variability (=randomness in MP) now affects the variation and frequency of weather cycles:
    • Higher variability will now produce larger variation and less predictability in the length of individual weather cycles (time between peaks).
    • High variability might produce both fast changes or prolonged weather spells (or both combined) within the same weekend simulation.
    • Low variability will produce more even weather cycles, akin to the pre-update model.
  • Revised certain aspects of weather functions, including standing water formation and dissipation.
  • Revised skewed track limit definitions for Oulton Park that prevented correct gain calculation.
  • Revised pit speeding thresholds that were often too permissive, both on pit entry and pit exit.
  • Fixed invalid lap being eligible for personal and session fastest (purple) lap in race sessions (also in Multiplayer results).
  • Overhaul of track limit warnings on wet track with its own dynamic, gain-based reference system.
  • Added measures against irregular driving before the green light in Hotlap and Hotstint game modes.
  • Fixed an issue with the Ferrari 488 GT3 (both versions) that resulted in an inconsistency in pitstop position versus other cars.
  • Replay: revised replay tyre rotation matrix calculation to avoid misalignment between tyres and rim (and reduce disk space). The improvement is backwards-compatible, while newly saved replays should occupy less disk space than before.
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About author
Mike Smith
I have been obsessed with sim racing and racing games since the 1980's. My first taste of live auto racing was in 1988, and I couldn't get enough ever since. Lead writer for RaceDepartment, and owner of SimRacing604 and its YouTube channel. Favourite sims include Assetto Corsa Competizione, Assetto Corsa, rFactor 2, Automobilista 2, DiRT Rally 2 - On Twitter as @simracing604

Comments

I have to admit, and it pains me a little, but ACC should probably now be considered the reference for ffb and handling, and probably physics, too.

The driving experience is very good and even though it's an empirical tyre model it's so close to doing the right things that it's very nearly not worth mentioning or worrying about.

I hope AMS2's next update has worked towards this type of handling.

I hopped in rF2 just a moment ago to, after having run quite a number of laps in ACC, and...it's a let down at the complete package level. Tyres feel a tiny bit better, but handling doesn't feel as good as ACC, something's just not crisp enough about it. Maybe it still wins in physics but the driving experience already feels like a let down. The lesser graphics at lower fps doesn't help its case.

I hope MG and S397 work towards making significant strides in the direction Reiza and Kunos have taken their sims. It'd be great to see rF2 shining next to those sims, again.
 
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I have to admit, and it pains me a little, but ACC should probably now be considered the reference for ffb and handling, and probably physics, too.

The driving experience is very good and even though it's an empirical tyre model it's so close to doing the right things that it's very nearly not worth mentioning or worrying about.

I hope AMS2's next update has worked towards this type of handling.

I hopped in rF2 just a moment ago to, after having run quite a number of laps in ACC, and...it's a let down at the complete package level. Tyres feel a tiny bit better, but handling doesn't feel as good as ACC, something's just not crisp enough about it. Maybe it still wins in physics but the driving experience already feels like a let down. The lesser graphics at lower fps doesn't help its case.

I hope MG and S397 work towards making significant strides in the direction Reiza and Kunos have taken their sims. It'd be great to see rF2 shining next to those sims, again.
It is just not a valid comparison between a GT3 only sim and a sim with a huge variety of cars.
Why is everybody craving about the GT3s these days?
Probably because those cars are the most forgiving and easy to drive, both in real life and in a sim.
Despite all the electronic aids, I'm pretty sure they are awesome fun to drive in reality.
But in a sim, they are awful and don't teach you anything. Boring as hell.
You don't learn anything about treshold braking, nothing about dancing on the very edge of the grip.

I know everybody will crucify me for saying this, but for me, rF2 is still the emperor of simracing, handling wise.
CART Factor, Mak-Corp Group C, those mods can teach you how to drive a car on the edge.
In the worst possible scenario, they can wastly improve your carting skills.
 
I have to admit, and it pains me a little, but ACC should probably now be considered the reference for ffb and handling, and probably physics, too
Not sure to understand why "it pains you a little" but I agree with you about ACC being at reference level of what the SIM state of the art is at for now.

Not light year ahead of any one, but a solid demonstration of what can be achieved when a talented and passionate developer put his heart into it and does not disperse his energy in too many different car types.

We end up with a very hight level simulator, some how limited in scope but still very satisfying.

I prefer the sand box type, supported by a healthy mod community, that you can fix yourself to your liking, but if the next SIMs coming to us are specialized, with the quality of ACC, I will still be happy.
 
I have no ffb with my DD1???

Latest fanalab version, all firmware updated.

DD1 works fine with other games.

I don't know what to do. :(
 
Fantastic update, in all aspects .
The game looks fantastic with FSR.
Until know I had about 90 fps, and now i can easily reach 130 fps, and that with about maxed graphic options.

I am running a GTX 1070 ti (overclocked) + intel core i7 8700K,
2140x1080 alienware wide 144hz.
No wheel and arms.

The game looks just incredible, so as the new BMW.

I don't know if it is me, but It seems to me that the cars are easier to control ?
or it is the new CSL DD on my cockpit ;)
that sais, I am a good second slower as my best laptime at the moment.

Once again, and in my case, the update is incredible for me
(same comment with the new feature AMD fidelity FSR in assetto corsa regarding the fps)
 
So the Thrustmaster SF1000 works… but only if you unplug your TH8A gear shifter if you have one! A bug I expect!

… after you have updated to version 1.81 (patch out today)
 
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I don't know if it is me, but It seems to me that the cars are easier to control ?
Easier to control…but harder to drive is that makes sense. I.e the new physics and FFB is giving you more communication as to what is happening….but there is now more happening!
 
I raced the Porsche at Zolder today. I don't know if it's because of the new CSL DD or because of AC 1.8 or both, but the improvement in handling is quite remarkable! Kudos to Kunos because they didn't just sit on their laurels, good job on the physics and the game performance. I am sure the addition of the US tracks and the new cup cars (Ferrari, Porsche, BMW, Lamborghini) will further expand the player base.
 
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Are you not tired of driving GT3 class since 2019 every time?
I would already be tired.
For 30 bucks with no service of working ranking system and adequate car damage system. Not to mention of productivity, real multiclass racing, driver swaps etc.
Hi, I am curious: productivity? And, you "would" be tired? It means you haven't even tried ACC but you know already that 30 bucks are too many?
 
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Omg 2 crashes already trying to race.

Also laptimes are so slow now overall, could easily do low 47's before in Monza, now a 49 low was pole there lol.
seen a stream by Aris saying laptimes could be up to 2seconds slower now but he says don't worry about that for now just enjoy the driving. I have yet to try it but looking forward
 
Probably a 'new patch placebo' effect, but AI seems livelier to me. Haven't run this sim in months but I remember them as being sleepy and docile, which made me sleepy and docile. Enjoying this sim at the moment.
 
I have to admit, and it pains me a little, but ACC should probably now be considered the reference for ffb and handling, and probably physics, too.

The driving experience is very good and even though it's an empirical tyre model it's so close to doing the right things that it's very nearly not worth mentioning or worrying about.

I hope AMS2's next update has worked towards this type of handling.

I hopped in rF2 just a moment ago to, after having run quite a number of laps in ACC, and...it's a let down at the complete package level. Tyres feel a tiny bit better, but handling doesn't feel as good as ACC, something's just not crisp enough about it. Maybe it still wins in physics but the driving experience already feels like a let down. The lesser graphics at lower fps doesn't help its case.

I hope MG and S397 work towards making significant strides in the direction Reiza and Kunos have taken their sims. It'd be great to see rF2 shining next to those sims, again.
This perception that people have is incredible. rF2 has *definitely* never been more accurate than even rF1 let alone AC/ACC. The tires in rF2 might indeed feel better due to having a bit more complex SAT behaviors and whatever possible, but in terms of driving tire forces you will always be able to get an empirical model to be way more accurate at this kind of simulation level IMO.

How the hell people have it entirely backwards is beyond me. Every time I say this I get treated like I'm the crazy person.
 
This perception that people have is incredible. rF2 has *definitely* never been more accurate than even rF1 let alone AC/ACC. The tires in rF2 might indeed feel better due to having a bit more complex SAT behaviors and whatever possible, but in terms of driving tire forces you will always be able to get an empirical model to be way more accurate at this kind of simulation level IMO.

How the hell people have it entirely backwards is beyond me. Every time I say this I get treated like I'm the crazy person.

As far as I understand it, that's the opposite of how it comes together. The best you could say is that physical tyre models get you some of the more advanced things easier or more immediately than an empirical model. For example, tyre flex.

As Renato from Reiza has said, they accomplish the same things but they come at them from different angles. They both try to converge on a center point, realism, but what it takes to get there is different from both sides, and each side has their pros and cons.

I'm sure you could get an empirical model to do what a physical one seems to do right off the bat but there's a reason iRacing, AMS2, rF2, BeamNG, and all these that are really trying to go to the next level, have or are going physical.
 
As far as I understand it, that's the opposite of how it comes together. The best you could say is that physical tyre models get you some of the more advanced things easier or more immediately than an empirical model. For example, tyre flex.

As Renato from Reiza has said, they accomplish the same things but they come at them from different angles. They both try to converge on a center point, realism, but what it takes to get there is different from both sides, and each side has their pros and cons.

I'm sure you could get an empirical model to do what a physical one seems to do right off the bat but there's a reason iRacing, AMS2, rF2, BeamNG, and all these that are really trying to go to the next level, have or are going physical.
That's cool and all but when talking about stuff like this it helps to have experience and have talked to people who have even more and not just listen to what marketing people or forumgoers say. I'm not an expert nor a tire model developer but I certainly do have 10 years of car model development under my belt and I've talked to *actual* experts, so I'll share my take:

An empirical model is practically more accurate because you can acquire data from the car and tire, then use that to match the behavior. You can't *practically* do that in a physical model with what kind of data it requires. To do that in a physical model to begin with would also assume the physical model's interactions are correct for slip and heat as well, not just the easy stuff like the mechanical aspects AND they are correct at the same time. You can't just have Tire A with right heat and Tire B with right slip, you want both.

If you're not convinced, you can just ask yourself why almost nobody in racing uses physical models. The answer is because for the kind of data that teams/sim devs can get their hands on, an empirical model will allow a more precise recreation of the important parts of the tire behavior while only sacrificing some minor things.

Sure in the long run a fully physical model made by a tire manufacturer with tire manufacturer data could be more accurate than an empirically correlated semi-empirical model even when running in real-time, but that kind of scenario isn't what 99.99% of car simulation development projects are.

Physical models do make sense for consumer sim games because A: Community doesn't actually care about accuracy nor can they judge it B: They can feel better and C: Great marketing.

In the long run if sim devs go and get a few thousand tires tested and cut up and make their fully physical models actually accurate and have tire data to back it up (Unlikely) they could also just be plainly better than semi-empirical models so I suppose it's a good investment for the future.

Not great if you care about practical accuracy *right now*, or even in the next 10 years, or probably ever because I don't think sim game companies are ever gonna have the hundreds of millions of dollars required.
 
seen a stream by Aris saying laptimes could be up to 2seconds slower now but he says don't worry about that for now just enjoy the driving. I have yet to try it but looking forward
It is what i could see aftzr my first tests ( imola, oulton Park, donington). About 2" slower, but not sure considering i have a news DD wheel i am not completely used to.

I don't care the game have never been so enjoyable to drive .
 
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I play ACC with a controller over GeForce Now streaming, so probably the worst possible way to experience the game. It's a game I've never got on with, until this update. Absolutely transforms the game for me, it's much more playable and enjoyable with an Xbox controller now. So much so that I've finally sprung for the DLC in the Steam sale. Had an absolutle blast driving the 720S GT3 around my local track, Oulton Park, last night.
 

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