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Why is American culture based off of fear and paranoia?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Mohameddo-san, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. Mohameddo-san

    Mohameddo-san
    F1 Sim Racer & #1 St. Bernard Lover on RD Premium Member

    http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/tag/paranoia

    I typed this as my Facebook status:

    "First, they came after the Indians, stole their lands and nearly killed them off; then, they enslaved Black people and lynched them for speaking out; they put Japanese in crowded camps after Pearl Harbor; they gathered those called Communists and jailed them; now, they arrest Muslims, interrogate and torture them. American culture is certainly a culture of fear and paranoia."
     
  2. Why is American culture based off of fear and paranoia?
    Because you canĀ“t sustain the type of foreign politics and warfare otherwise.

     
  3. I personally live in the U.S. and people are just trained from the moment that they are born that the United States is the greatest country. Also, the school system is terrible, as I learn more in a weekend at home googling random shiitake than I do at school in a month. The thing that needs to be done is merely teaching people the ability to think, all work and occupations the average American performs is monotonous and they could easily be replaced by a machine to do their job. The person is only involved in a job still because a machine doesn't pay taxes.

    I watched this documentary on Netflix called "South of the Border", I believe it's called, it's about the series of great, revolutionary leaders in South America that refuse to work with America for economic purposes, and they are being labeled as dictators. It's rather quite interesting even though it's slightly off topic here.

    edit: just watched that video, just awesome
     
  4. Mapu

    Mapu
    Premium Member

    Very drastic and to the point Jasper. I don't have a detailed insight into the daily life of a US citizen but I think I could agree in some points regarding the ordinary citizen. Although the term "ordinary citizen" needs a closer definition.

    I m not quite sure, but sometimes I get the impression that (not all) US citizens are afraid to think for themselfs or at least they unlearned it?

    "South of the Border" from Oliver Stone? While it only scratches the surface, it's still worth a watch.
     
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