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Setup help for Celica GTO

Discussion in 'rFactor 2' started by William Wester, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. I've looked through the setup forum but didn't find anything for the Toyota Celica GTO. I'm loving this car but I'am struggling with on-power oversteer, any suggestions? Thanks...
  2. It will allways oversteer, no matter what you do on the setup side, you need to be gentle on the throttle just like in the real car ;)

    And remember, the more you drive it, the more you'll realise it will work much better under throttle to do some corners ;)
  3. First balance the car (springs, swaybars, tire pressure) on a skidpad, so you find suitable balance under neutral throttle. Then, especially with the Celica GTO, set the shocks to ease that throttle oversteer and improve the grip on bumpy surfaces... default settings are, uh, off the mark.
  4. Thanks for the comments/suggestions. I don't expect to tune out all of the oversteer, it just a particular trait of this car that I was hoping to improve on.

    The suggestion to use the skidpad is good starting point, but I'm not good at setup changes so "First balance the car..." is where I'am now...I know I need to balance the car but I don't which way to go with springs, swaybars, tire pressure, etc. - softer front/back, higher front/back, etc..
    I don't usually tweak much more than brake balance or aero, I just never have much time to race let alone tweak setups. Thanks.
  5. Car is understeery off throttle, so first you have to clear that tendency... neutral balance with slight oversteer under braking or throttle is the key ;)

    You'll only realise what you should do the more you drive and understand the car...
  6. But I understand what balance means, and what under-steer and over-steer mean. What I'm not good at is knowing which setting tweaks are best to control a particular trait. If I look at one particular trait - over-steer when throttling out of a corner. I don't know the best approach to improve this - to lessen the over-steer tendency. I assumed someone with a good understanding of race car setup and good knowledge of rFactor 2 could say something like "increase the spring rate by 200 lbs and lower the rear tire pressure by 2 psi". Not saying these are good for this particular over-steer issue, just an example of real metrics I can try.
    Can't blame a guy for trying to find some guidance.
  7. I'll send you something tomorrow. Son's birthday is tonight. I'm not at my computer right now but you can try reducing rear ARB and/or softening rear shocks to allow the rear to dive a bit more under power. Also decreasing power differential might help also and might reducing rear tire pressure. That's all I can think of off the top of my head. Additionally, their are a number of setup guides here ==> Link as well is here on Race Department I think.
  8. Thanks @Kevin Knorpp, these are some tips I can try. I really like the Celica GTO mod, especially with the 80's IMSA skin pack. I can live with the handling as-is (my previous tweaking helped a little) but if I could tame the over-steer a little more it would make it even more enjoyable.
    Some cars are hard to drive on the limit but are balanced, the Celica for the most part is very predictable but has a very short over-steer temper - very easily aroused :x3:
  9. David O'Reilly

    David O'Reilly
    A bad quali means I can go forwards in the race.

    To reduce on throttle oversteer.
    Increase diff lock on power side.
    Lower rear slow bump dampers and increase slow rebound.
    Do opposite at the front. (only if needed)
    Lower rear springs/stiffen front springs
    All the above (except diff) will let the chassis settle earlier and longer over the rear axle. Try them gradually and indvidually.
    Lower rear ARB or increase front ARB. (tightening up one end gives more compliance - grip at the other.
    I have tried to put them in the order that will have the least to the most impact on the oversteer you might want at turn entry. So start at the top.

    In controller settings it might hepl to lower throttle sensitivity to75%
  10. Thanks for the suggestions @Kevin Knorpp and @David O'Reilly. I haven't had a lot of time to test with the GTO but the short of it... nothing seems to make this car "easy" to drive, especially on cold tires - and I'm not saying it should be easy.

    Gurney's Celicas Used to Laugh at the Competition. We Find Out the Punchline.
    by Matthew Hayashibara, Sport Compact Car, September 1999

    How would Dan (Gurney) describe driving the car? Was the turbocharged engine peaky? Dan dispels this generalization immediately, "No, it wasn't peaky-it had a good fat range of power. It didn't want to run low, of course. It made its best power at about 8000 rpm. It was good power from about 6000 on up. So it had a good range, very drivable, not bad from the throttle response aspect."

    Handling and braking? Was it well balanced in that regard? "I don't even know how to talk about it. When I got in the GTO car, it was a pretty violent machine. So it doesn't lend itself to word descriptions like 'well balanced' or 'neutral handling'. No, it's more like hang on to your hat, and be quick with the steering wheel! Shift at just the right time. You're going so fast it's ridiculous! But with those brakes-the stopping was just as ridiculous. It's not something you can talk about if you're used to driving normal passenger cars. It's a whole 'nother level. I've never ridden a bull in a rodeo, but there's an element of that in it. (Dan's buddy, Parnelli Jones described off-road racing as an "all-day airplane crash", which seems rather apt here.) It seemed to respond to a very rough driving style, but it also took some 'finesse'."
  11. "All day airplane crash"

    Nice one :laugh: