• “Just being a mediocre driver has never been my ambition. That's not my style” ― Michael Schumacher
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Have a chance to win a copy of F1 2017 The Game (PC) by following RaceDepartment on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Twitch, Steam and / or YouTube.

New NASCAR Game Coming this Year, DMR Get's a Rebranding

Discussion in 'NASCAR Heat 2' started by Paul Jeffrey, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. Paul Jeffrey

    Paul Jeffrey
    RaceDepartment Editor-in-Chief Staff Premium

    Messages:
    7,243
    Ratings:
    +12,369
    NASCAR Heat Evolution DMR rebranding 2.jpg
    NASCAR Heat Evolution developers Dusenberry Martin Racing rebranded and confirm new game to launch towards the end of 2017.


    With NASCAR Heat Evolution universally considered to have fallen rather short of players expectations back in 2016, the development team behind the title have gone to great lengths this winter to restructure and reassess their priorities as they gear up to hopefully produce a new game worthy of the official NASCAR racing licence.

    Whilst retaining the considerable might of Monster Games to work on the sequel to NASCAR Heat Evolution, the now newly titled 704games have looked to expand their back office staff and re focus their attentions to the popular series, with work having already begun on a new Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and Windows PC release of the NASCAR franchise.

    As part of the rebranding announcement today, 704games have confirmed the signing of industry veteran and former NASCAR Senior Vice President Paul Brooks as the studio's new CEO. According to the official announcement Brooks spent 19 years with NASCAR in various leadership roles including Senior Vice President of NASCAR and President of NASCAR Media Group. In 2016, Brooks became an investor in Dusenberry Martin Racing and serves as Chairman of the Board.

    “With decades of game development and publishing experience across our entire team at 704Games, there is tremendous opportunity for our future,” said Brooks. “Not only will 704Games offer new platforms for fans to get in the action of their favourite sport and continue to help introduce fans to NASCAR with high-quality and innovative products, but we’re also developing areas to expand our gaming library to new places.

    704Games will continue to hold NASCAR’s exclusive console simulation-style video game license. The company will release its first NASCAR-branded mobile racing game this spring, as well as a much-anticipated sequel to its 2016 console game, NASCAR Heat Evolution, this fall.

    About 704Games
    704Games is a video game publisher and developer focused on delivering high-quality experiences on console and mobile. 704Games, a video game licensee of NASCAR, released their first console game, NASCAR Heat Evolution, in September 2016 on the PlayStation®4 computer entertainment system and Xbox One. 704Games is headquartered at NASCAR Plaza in Charlotte, North Carolina.


    NASCAR Heat Evolution is available to purchase for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and via Steam for PC.

    NASCAR Heat Evolution DMR rebranding 3.jpg NASCAR Heat Evolution DMR rebranding 4.jpg NASCAR Heat Evolution DMR rebranding.jpg

    Check out the NASCAR Heat Evolution sub forum here at RaceDepartment for more of the news and discussion regarding the PC, Xbox One and PlayStation 4 version of the game. If you like online racing, why not check out the awesome NASCAR Friday Night Heat Series or visit our mods section for some downloadable content.

    What do you think of NASCAR Heat Evolution? Do you think the "new" studio can create a suitably improved game second time around? Let us know in the comments section below!
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Slyfrequency

    Slyfrequency

    Messages:
    1,014
    Ratings:
    +380
    After 14 years, there's still not a better NASCAR game than NASCAR Racing Season 2003, the community behind that was huge and parts of it still remain. Give us that with updated physics and graphics and you will sell sell sell. I still play nr2003 very often.

    Regarding console gaming Heat Evolution was much better than previous takes with the NASCAR license over the past few years, but wasn't a touch on EA in my opinion.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
    • Haha Haha x 1
  3. @apocapollo

    @apocapollo

    Messages:
    81
    Ratings:
    +75
    I'll tag along and add this, 704games is also publishing a NASCAR Heat Mobile game. If you live in Canada, you can already find it on the app store as part of the "soft launch". Free to play, 40 cars on screen at once, all the official tracks, and a sort of tycoon/clicker/management mode that deals with the financials of your race team. You get a limited amount of race fuel that replenishes over time, so I guess that's the f2p gimmick that you have to deal with. Hopefully the f2p elements are reasonable.

    This would be the first official NASCAR mobile game, not counting add-on content for things like Real Racing 3 or games made by teams, sponsors, or tracks. A full field of 40 cars is something I didn't expect to see on a mobile game. Apparently, the new developers (not MGI of the console series) used a draw distance effect similar to Silent Hill's fog to get 40 cars to work - maybe a mix of LODs and dark concealing shaders.

    EDIT - the developers are Firebrand games. They've apparently worked on mobile/nintendo ports for Trackmania, Codemasters, Need for Speed, THQ, Hot Wheels, Cars, etc. They developed all versions of the NASCAR Unleashed kart-racing game from 2011.

     
    • Like Like x 5
  4. Peter Hooper

    Peter Hooper
    Premium

    Messages:
    14,374
    Ratings:
    +8,367
    I loved all of the Papyrus games from back in the late 80's through to early 2000's and they formed the core of my racing experience during that time. I could not begin to work out how many hours I spent on their Nascar games through those years.

    Nascar Heat Evolution, even though being slated on many fronts since it's release is a very solid recreation of the sport in my view and I have thoroughly enjoyed it in the time since I picked it up a few months ago and it has certainly been a massive surprise to me.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Paul Jeffrey

    Paul Jeffrey
    RaceDepartment Editor-in-Chief Staff Premium

    Messages:
    7,243
    Ratings:
    +12,369
    How do you NASCAR guys see the stock cars in rF2 out of interest? Is it the lack of official licence, car brands or something else do you think that holds it back?

    I'm no NASCAR expert by any account, but I kind of assumed that the rF2 stockcars would be more popular than they ended up being. Just wondering why :)
     
  6. @apocapollo

    @apocapollo

    Messages:
    81
    Ratings:
    +75
    I've been working on a 2017 carset for the ISI stock cars in rF2. I'm not super impressed with the oval AI. You can tell that the AI was built for road racing and then converted to ovals. Things like pit road behavior and lane merging... issues that only crop up when you're only turning left.

    The lack of official tracks and cars is also a major issues. Generic NASCAR looks goofy to NASCAR fans, there's just lots of tiny details that are lost when you're not paying too much mind to real life. The lacking amount of fictional/clone tracks is also a bad look. As it stands, I think there's less than a dozen oval tracks on Steam. Not particularly enticing for stock car fans, who still have the option to race iRacing or NR2003.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Peter Hooper

    Peter Hooper
    Premium

    Messages:
    14,374
    Ratings:
    +8,367
    I'm currently a console racer only and have not had the pleasure of PC racing for some years.

    My take on it though is that the lack of an official license holds these things back massively. I know from my point of view I have to do a lot of my racing offline and to do so is much more fun when racing in cars and against drivers and following the real world schedule that I see week in week out in the real series. I would not get anywhere near the same enjoyment and immersion out of generic liveried cars on tracks that are not part of a real Nascar season.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Paul Jeffrey

    Paul Jeffrey
    RaceDepartment Editor-in-Chief Staff Premium

    Messages:
    7,243
    Ratings:
    +12,369
    Thanks for the reply fellas :)

    So you think it's mostly down to both AI and the lack of official content then? How do the actual cars themselves feel, do they offer up a decent driving experience and are they any good in an online race?

    I've always been a NASCAR fan from a distance (my first 500 was in 1999 I think, back in the days of Earnhardt and Irvan) watching on Sky at a friends house and always had an interest in it, without ever delving too deep into the sport.

    It's one of those things I've kinda fancied driving in a league situation (but not getting involved in iRacing) for a while, but don't know if it would be popular enough to run here at RD, or even if it's worth the trouble
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Peter Hooper

    Peter Hooper
    Premium

    Messages:
    14,374
    Ratings:
    +8,367
    lol you must have been reading my mind... I wrote very similar at the same time.
     
  10. Paul Jeffrey

    Paul Jeffrey
    RaceDepartment Editor-in-Chief Staff Premium

    Messages:
    7,243
    Ratings:
    +12,369
    Liveries obviously won't matter because you can paint your own / download mods and stuff. It's the tracks that are a killer. Actually I'm surprised someone hasn't yet tried to make a NASCAR mod using the physics from the ISI cars.. that would be cool, with all the proper manufacturers..
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Paul Jeffrey

    Paul Jeffrey
    RaceDepartment Editor-in-Chief Staff Premium

    Messages:
    7,243
    Ratings:
    +12,369
    Edit: Bugger mis read that one about the car set :)

    Do you mean skins, or the actual cars?
     
  12. Peter Hooper

    Peter Hooper
    Premium

    Messages:
    14,374
    Ratings:
    +8,367
    I've been really impressed with Nascar Heat in offline mode but it is much more limited online. Unfortunately the only online series (here on RD http://www.racedepartment.com/forums/xbox-one-nascar-friday-night-heat-series.425/) is at a time that makes it very difficult for me to participate but I know the guys there have had some fun with it. There is no damage online though and no cautions either so they have to be called manually by the drivers themselves.

    I was put off of the game initially because of the bad reviews and held back from purchase for several months but when it went on digital discount I picked it up and have not regretted it since. Myself and @Rob are running a 50% offline Championship in line with the current season and are having a real blast with it. Some of the racing is the most fun (and intense) I have had in almost 30 years of computer racing.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Love Love x 1
  13. Danneskjold184

    Danneskjold184

    Messages:
    26
    Ratings:
    +11
    With Steam Workshop items, I'm sitting at 19 oval tracks for RF2, not counting doubles.


    But a big, dedicated GOOD NASCAR sim racer is still desired. If these companies started working on a Sim, and then built in arcade-like options, they'd be rolling in the money. Instead, they approach it from the other angle. Start with an arcade game, and build in difficulty options, and the game falls flat.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  14. Slyfrequency

    Slyfrequency

    Messages:
    1,014
    Ratings:
    +380
    I love rFactor 2 but it's not a dedicated NASCAR game, things are missing here and there, little details like track logos and sponsors around the tracks. Another element of NASCAR are the crashes that can happen, especially at Daytona and Talladega when you've got 20+ cars involved, since rFactor 2 doesn't have crash physics, racing the AI for long periods of time is a bit boring, like the AI aren't bad from my experience on the ovals. I can't ever see myself replicating a full offline season in its current state, I'll just stick to all the other juicy rF2 content :sneaky:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Pywackett-Barchetta

    Pywackett-Barchetta

    Messages:
    99
    Ratings:
    +66
    I've actually been eyeing getting my hands on rFactor 2 for a while expressly because of the stock cars and the off-brand track recreations. I love when they make something original out of it.

    This is the big concern as well, though. Most games that try to do oval racing and don't make it a major focused feature tend to not have competitive enough AI for what is an entirely different kind of racing, in practice. There is no one perfect line. It's constantly changing. Much as I love NASCAR, booting up a game expressly for stock cars feels a little disappointing in this day and age, but it makes sense due to having better suited competition for it and a wide variety of applicable courses.

    (Side note: much as I don't feel the need to have every single course on the circuit in NASCAR titles, it's rather difficult to find a game that has a wide variety of ovals otherwise (outside of older IndyCar games). So many non-oval-focused titles tend to omit short tracks, or put a lot of focus on Indianapolis and a single tri-oval specifically.)
     
    • Love Love x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. Dave R

    Dave R

    Messages:
    617
    Ratings:
    +205
    I enjoyed NHE over the previous efforts. I think it needs just a bit of work and it should be much improved. For PC, let us adjust FOV, look left right and back, and make the AI a bit better for Tally/Daytona and I'll be happy. Give me the truck series and Xfinity series so I can have a proper career mode and I'll be over the moon.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Rob

    Rob
    Premium

    Messages:
    8,573
    Ratings:
    +3,088
    Clue number one. NASCAR, no matter what you tink of it, is still the most corporately nimble major series on the planet. And they are "it" for the American market, outside of IndyCar catching up fast. They are also, essentially, a monopoly and have been sued for anti-trust violations many times. But one thing they are not is subtle. Or tolerant. As everyone knows, they will change on a dime.

    I do think it has the 20% hooked, so NASCAR (rather France thugs) sat DBR down in a room and said "guys, about the only thing you showed us is that you are not as bad as those eye-TAL-yans (I'm sure they were not Italians) that made the last piece of crap. So, either you make a game that works (and I'm sure they meant "sells" or that you can play with your friends) or your $1.4 contract will disappear faster than sh*t through a goose." That's not an exaggeration. lol. Whether the motivation worked, I don't know, but I hope so, because I'd hate to see this franchise go back to a European developer (which goes double for a large U.S. developer). They can't seem to wrap their minds around oval racing, and DBR really nailed the physics and the A.I., and the setups. I never thought you wold be able to race NASCAR A.I. and have it feel so real, but other parts of the game are very broken.

    Too bad this site does not have more NASCAR fans, but I understand where the bread is buttered. There are plenty out there, in any case. NASCAR this year has made a big push (much like F1) to fix its sagging viewer base. In many ways, I think they are on the right track, but please don't remember I said that. lol. Even though it's a big sport, in NC, where I live, it's a small community. An RD press credential here for NASCAR would get you roughly the equivalent of David Croft access in F1...without the respect. lol.

    So, the net result is, DBR will either make this into the finest NASCAR game ever produced, or DBR will be sh*t canned in eight months. It's like F1 2015 -- everyone poo-poo'ed it in general, but you could tell (with DiRT Rally out there) that it was the foundation of something great.

    They nailed the physics but left room for improvement. You can actually feel any of the 1.7 billion setup adjustments that each car offers for qualy and race. And the A.I. are almost perfect (head on over to Charlotte SMS). Many many very hardcore fans here in the states are playing it with a love/hate relationship. It's not a SIM yet, except in SP. But the things they have to fix (70% of online, button controls, pit entry for AI, and UDP support) it's not impossible. They have the core right.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
    • Like Like x 2
  18. bigdaddy24

    bigdaddy24

    Messages:
    31
    Ratings:
    +18
    I do like them to,I just wish they would put real car models out. I do think they have come a long way. I think if you had a mod out like VHR for rfactor 1 for rfactor 2 it would be great
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. bigdaddy24

    bigdaddy24

    Messages:
    31
    Ratings:
    +18
    I do not hold nothing high for this new game,Every year they change the name of the company and say it going to be a great game with new people behind it. I just wonder why they think they can do better this time around. I said i would not buy another game from them till they at least put a update out for the engine sound,I mean if they can't get that close i don't see how they can fix a hole game.
     
  20. Rob

    Rob
    Premium

    Messages:
    8,573
    Ratings:
    +3,088
    Ultimately NASCAR the sanctioning body will find "a game" that they want to represent their sport. I'm a console guy, but people tell me iRacing seems to be as close as you can get these days, quality wise. Even Dale Jr. runs a team via iRacing (and one kid got a spot in a real lower tier series by being on Dale's team - see below). Dale actually believes and invests in the proposition that kids can learn to drive solely through a SIM when young, then make a faster and easier transition into real cars somewhere after mid-teens.

    Seeing so many drivers on you tube and commercials and other media during release told me that NASCAR was fully behind this. I'm sure they view iRacing as a great thing, but something they can't control. Same with any other PC game. I have no doubt that NASCAR will find a game maker that can sell loads of games. But here's the rub -- will popularity mean a better SIM? And will NASCAR legally crack down copies or discourage their drivers from promoting them?

    In my opinion, popularity, these days, does equal a better SIM, even on console (and that's where this theory has to work, really). But there is a caveat. In the American market, that's not necessarily true. The real racing market is so diverse that to a "numbers guy" it may appear that games like Forza will sell best. But I think that's short-sighted. Since the market here is so large and can really crush a developer's profit margin one way or another, if you can find the "untapped" market, you can still pull of a stunner in the game world. pCARS owes much of its success, I bet, to this "untapped" GT SIM driver here. Is there an "untapped" market for a NASCAR game that is both branded, on the console, and a SIM? Big league. And fans know what it should look and feel like. They know that you need a trackbar adjustment in car to be real. lol. So, if these can marry up, there is a good chance you will get one good product. Maybe not iRacing, but more like F1.

    Will NASCAR legally crack down copies or discourage their drivers from promoting them? No. NASCAR loves their drivers, and would not dream of legally challenging someone like Dale Jr. It would be a public nightmare. But if there are any licenses out there, they will yank them. If this ticks off drivers who irace, it gets stickier, but not much. What would happen is that the new drivers would be geared toward the official game, hopefully after playing it in grade school.