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Need a skybox taller than Krunch's (!)

Discussion in 'Bob's Track Builder' started by Emery, Jan 13, 2010.

  1. Big tall mountain sticking up out of the desert plains is sticking through Krunch's skybox. Any suggestions? Just move the horizon image down and raise the whole skybox in something like 3DSimEd? Are there any other tall skyboxes available?

    Oh, wait... maybe I just need to increase the diameter of the skybox. Yeah, that's what I need, not taller, just wider.
     
  2. Aha! After resizing the skybox and horizon GMTs and not seeing any improvement, I began looking in the SCN file. Raising and lowering the skybox wasn't going to be the answer, but I noticed the ClipPlanes statement near the start of the file. BTB default is ClipPlanes=(0.05, 1500.0) and I took a stab that the second number was horizon distance, increased it to 2500.0, tested in rFactor, and there was much joy.
     
  3. ...Dig through the hundreds of tracks avaliable for grt/rF/GTL, and choose the skybox that fits Your needs
    -Open Your track in 3dsimed with the new skybox, resize and reposition the skybox, and replace the skybox textures with the ones You have choosen for Your scene.
     
  4. Yes you solved it Emery. It has nothing to do with the skybox as the skybox and horizon cylinder are set to have no Z buffer, plus with my system they move up and down with the viewer's eyepoint (unlike the default ISI skyboxes). This means they ALWAYS appear behind every other object in the scene - until those objects reach the clipping distance of course. So yes increasing the clipping distance means the objects stay visible for longer, hopefully until the viewer moves behind something closer. I've had to increase it to 2500 (metres) for my current track as I have a few areas where the viewer can see quite a long way across the track vicinity. Note that track cameras have their own clipping distances.