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Improving F1

Discussion in 'Formula 1' started by stadlereric, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. stadlereric

    stadlereric
    Premium

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    if you could change one aspect of Formula 1 to make it more exciting, or interesting what would that one thing be? Go back to V12's? No DRS/ERS systems? Manual gear boxes?

    I'd really enjoy watching a driver's race. By that I mean take the current line up of teams and drivers and let them run one race with the exact same car. Maybe a Ford RS1600? Run 20 laps at a shorter historical track and see who comes out on top. That would be fun to watch!
     
  2. yusupov

    yusupov

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    thats a cool idea ive not heard proposed before, but ofc its also a gimmick. wont draw in new fans, just be a curiosity for current ones.

    tbh until i see evidence otherwise im going to trust that liberty has a handle on the general direction the sport should go. make them faster: great. give the drivers tires that can be driven hard: great.

    i think ERS is here to stay, but i don't understand the limit; if its fiscally feasible surely it should be at least doubled. i don't like continued the emphasis on management there. similarly, i'm all for bringing back refueling IF it'll make for better racing. if tire strategy & management is heavily de-emphasized this season, it could be way to re-introduce the strategic element, which, while almost universally disliked, also kept a lot of people tuned in. the bonus is that instead of slowing cars down, itll make them faster. (ive never watched refuel-era F1, so any comments about the effect this has on races would be appreciated)

    but primarily & ultimately the goal should be to limit the effects of dirty air w/ an aim to eliminating DRS, at least as its currently implemented, & i think liberty feels the same...that means 2017 could be the fastest cars we see for a few years, but given how insanely quick they already are -- multiple seconds/lap faster than anything ever seen -- that shouldn't really be much of a problem.