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GRID: Autosport - The Leagues

Discussion in 'GRID Autosport' started by Rob, May 21, 2014.

  1. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    I know it's early and I know that last GRID (GRID2) was far from appealing, especially to league gamers like ourselves. However, I have been kicking around the idea of trying to generate interest in a Grid - Autosport league for three primary reasons:

    1. It's the last hurrah for the 360 when it comes to tin tops and a multiple discipline platform. True, it could go all FUBAR, but there are many indications from Codemasters that they have meant this game to be a mea culpa of sorts. God knows they have the ability (as the popularity of F1 suggests) to create a great handling game. From there, other "wants" may tend to fall into place, much like Race Pro (only with much better graphics). Here is some posts, data, clippings, videos, quotes, etc. to point at what I am trying to say:

    a. No pit stops, but flashbacks, which can be disabled. To be fair, the disciplines that we would form leagues around really do not pit...namely GP3 and Touring Car Series' such as WTCC, BTCC. Others do, though, like DTM and Aussie V8's, but we could live with the sprint races, I think?

    b. Handling. To quote the Codies, "For GRID Autosport we’ve gone back to a more authentic handling style. It’s definitely not a full simulation – we want it to be authentic, not clinical – but it’s more towards that end of the spectrum than before. If anything, we believe the handling is actually one or two steps further towards simulation than Race Driver: GRID, to give you an idea." The have said if on a sliding scale 60% SIM 40% Arcade.
    This was the big mistake in GRID2. So if they get this right, imagine all the fun we could have running, say, a Touring car series across several series' cars in sprint or semi-endurance format (day and night racing only....no rain).

    c. Cars. WTCC Spec Touring Car; Formula 3; IndyCar; British Touring Cars, DTM; Street cars, such as the BMW M3, etc.

    d. Tracks. Confirmed -- Hockenheim, Sepang, Circuit Mont-Tremblant, San Francisco, Jarama, Jerez, and Yas Marina. Speculated - Indianapolis Oval, Bathurst, Spa, Red Bull Ring, and Algarve.
    Gameplay. "slipstreaming is present in all modes but in Open wheel it's more evident." "For qualifying you have x amount of time, set the fastest time. Bit like F1 in that regard." "All cars / all tracks on Custom Online with a few exceptions (can’t drive a drift car on a non drift route etc)" "Online, you can jump into what we call Custom Cup, that allows you to race with a vast amount of options, choose the discipline, track, car, AI, practice, qualifying, race length, difficulty settings, pretty much anything you’d need." "Re: AI --AI have been tuned to each discipline, so a Touring Car AI driver will race completely different to an Open Wheel driver, one a bit aggressive the other really disciplined and precise. Yes, AI can make mistakes, I’ve been in a race, making my way through the pack when I’ve suddenly had to swerve out of the way of an accident up ahead. Likewise I’ve come around a corner only to find a car sat in the gravel kicking up dust where he/she has spun off." "Practice is back" "Night racing is an option" "No weather effects"
    Here are some videos from pre-alpha gameplay:



    e. Damage Model. Your car can suffer damage not only by contact but with improper driving like over-revving and shifting at the wrong time, (primarily in manual gears), will cause the gearbox to accrue damage more quickly. AI also suffer mechanical damage on their own. Endurance races are 40 minutes, but you can also set a lap count, up to 20 I believe. Tire wear is back in endurance races. From preview videos I can make out HUD indicators for tire damage/wear, engine damage, traction control and ABS. You also have the ability to press a button and get feedback (others' positions, your status, etc.) from a race engineer. Two cockpit views with movement, much like shift2. Read more here: http://blog.codemasters.com/grid/05/the-damage-of-grid-autosport/

    2. GRID: Autosport ("GAS") will have the ability to run on last gen platforms. I still use the xbox 360, and since pCars is a gonner, this is the next best hope for a true racing game that is not series specific.

    3. Probably the most exciting yet ill defined and mysterious facet is the multiplayer experience. Apparently, it will be like no other before. Here are the two posts from the Codies so far:
    http://blog.codemasters.com/grid/05/grid-autosport-online-racing-vehicle-progression/
    http://blog.codemasters.com/grid/05/discipline-progression-game-modes/

    What I find really interesting is how the cars that you "purchase" are treated like your baby and you earn "money" (and the right to improve them) as you use them in races. They also require maintenance, like a real car. Here are some relevant quotes:

    Cars are not XP-locked in GRID Autosport, all you need is the in-game Cash to buy them, (you can earn in-game Cash by winning events, completing Sponsor objectives etc.). In the mean time, you can loan any car you want. This means that if your friend has bought a very expensive Hypercar, you’ll still be able to race with them by borrowing a car from the same class.
    “So why would I ever want to buy a car?” I hear you ask; well, remember that only vehicles that you’ve bought can level-up and unlock Tuning Packs, Upgrades, repairs, cosmetic customisations and bonus rewards. You’ll be able to compete with a loaned car, but if you really want to stand out and have an edge over your opponents, you’ll need to buy one of your own.


    Each car is a true individual with its own mileage, win/loss rate, and XP level. The more time you spend driving a particular car, the more its XP level increases, and the more Upgrades and Tuning Packs you’ll unlock for it. Not only that, but higher-level cars earn XP and Cash faster than lower-level ones. There are caveats, however. Careless drivers will find that their car doesn’t quite perform as well as it did in previous races if they keep smashing it up. Small fractions of damage will get carried over as Wear & Tear, which you’ll need to repair in order to keep your cars performing at peak condition. Higher mileage cars will accumulate Wear & Tear faster than factory-fresh ones, so players will need to make tactful decisions when it’s time to replace a car that is becoming too expensive to maintain.

    Players who are new to racing will find the same range of Assists available in Multiplayer as in the rest of the game. You can enable Traction Control, Anti-Lock Braking, Stability Control, Steering Assists, and a Racing Line indicator. Again, each of these settings will affect your difficulty bonuses, and veteran players can crank it up even further by disabling their HUD, restricting their view to cockpit only, or using manual transmission. At the start of every Multiplayer race, you’ll have a brief period of time in the Service Area where you can tune, repair or upgrade your car, or review the Event Rules and Standings Tables. You’ll also see the “One to Watch”, a returning feature from past Codemasters’ titles. You might be chosen as the One to Watch if you’ve completed more clean races, achieved more podiums, or driven faster than all of your opponents, for example.

    Online Custom Cup is the game mode where you get to have your cake and eat it. Here, you can configure an Event to exactly the way you like it, and the rewards will fit the difficulty options you choose. In GRID Autosport, you can even make a Custom Cup pay out more than a Playlist event if you make it tough enough! Here’s a breakdown of the things you can configure in a Custom Cup:
    • Discipline – pick your favourite style of racing.
    • Vehicle Class – the type of vehicles you want to drive.
    • Race Type – the available Race Types will depend on what Discipline and Vehicles you’ve picked.
    • Number of Events – create a mini-championship up to five Events long.
    • AI – choose whether or not to add AI opponents to the session, which will fill any available slots on the grid. The difficulty of the AI can be changed as well.
    • Tracks – choose the track, route, lighting conditions and race length for each Event.
    • Upgrades, Tuning and Assists – can be disabled individually to level the playing field.
    • Manual Only – turn this on if you want everyone to use manual transmission.
    • Cockpit Cam Only – can be enabled for an ultra-hardcore experience.
    • Pre- and Post-race timers – can be made longer or shorter to suit your preferences.
    • Collisions – can be turned off if you don’t want vehicles to collide with each other.
    • Grid Order – provides a range of options for how you want the grid to be ordered at the start of each race.
    • Damage – can be set to Full or Visual Only. In Visual Only, your car will still crumple in a crash, but it won’t develop any mechanical defects.
    • Flashbacks – the number of Online Flashbacks that are allowed per race can be set here.
    Depending on the settings you pick, there is a difficulty modifier which increases or decreases. Therefore a race with Damage and Collisions enabled, for example, will pay out more than one with the same settings disabled. If you normally race with assists enabled, they will temporarily be overridden while you are in a session that restricts them, but you will be rewarded appropriately while you are in that session. When you leave the session, your preferences will be reinstated again.

    Online Custom Cup allows you to experiment and combine GRID Autosport’s content in new ways. If you want to race cars from the Street Discipline on regular circuits, you can do that here. Likewise, if you want to drive Open-Wheel vehicles around city circuits for example, that is also possible in Custom Cup. As the host of a Custom Cup, it’s up to you to make a fun racing experience for your fellow racers.


    A few more things....

    There will be penalties for corner cutting. You will have to get all four wheels off the road, but I think this letter or email explains it best:
    Hi all,
    We’re really flat out at the moment trying to close the game, so apologies for being a bit quiet in the last week. However, we couldn’t help notice the corner cutting thread, and wanted to give some more information on this, because I understand why it’s a concern.

    We’ve made a lot of changes since GRID2, and only some of those were present in the announce code builds (from which the recent YouTube gameplay footage was taken). That announce code is 2-3 months old now, and the game has advanced a great deal since then.

    We’re still balancing it now, but here’s a list of changes that have occurred:

    • You now need to have all 4 wheels across the white line to incur a penalty. We’ve fixed this since the announce build was created
    • You only incur a penalty if you’ve gained an advantage for going off track. If you re-join the track no better off than driving at full speed on the driving line, you won’t get a penalty.
    • The penalty is proportionate to the amount of advantage gained, so tiny, accidental cuts of the white lines will only slow you down a little before you get up to full power
    • The off track surfaces are much more realistic than they were in GRID2, where you could pretty much hold full speed even off road. In Autosport, you’ve got a realistic amount of grip and slowdown on grass, gravel etc, which makes it pretty tricky to drive off road and gain an advantage
    • In multiplayer, we ghost players who have incurred a penalty, so they can’t block you
    You may also have noticed that we apply penalties in a smoother, less jarring way than GRID2.

    Hope this is useful and interesting information, and I’m sure you’ll get to see this in action as and when we’re doing live streams further down the line.
    -- James, Codemasters Handling Programmer

    There will not be penalties for other infractions, like you see in F1. So, in essence, the biggest downside is that if you take damage and it is not your fault, you cannot pit to repair or expect the other guilty party to suffer a penalty. Although this is a major weakness, I think we all record races and we can get around this with a good team of stewards and some self-policing.

    My idea is to create maybe two separate leagues. One for Touring Cars that races with different touring class cars (DTM, Aussie V8, WTCC, BTCC) on a few tracks that are appropriate to them (Bathurst!!!!! :inlove:) and so there you have it. Follow the general 2-3 race format for WTCC or BTCC and you have a series.

    The other is to have an open wheel series. This will be a bit more complicated, but GP3 would be fairly straightforward. They run in sprint races too. IndyCar would not be as clear yet. I think they will have the 2.5 mile Indianapolis Oval track, but what other ovals or street courses they have is not clear. Of course, we could simple keep the GP3 format and incorporate the IndyCars too.

    What I need now is feedback.

    1. Who would be interested in doing this?
    2. What are your thoughts -- ANY thoughts -- about the above?
    3. What days and times would you be able to race in a league?

    Thanks.
    Robert

    _______________________

    Interested in League Play So Far (Any Platform):

    1. Robert Waddell
    2. Railer Cantrell
    3. Matthew Booth
    4. Peter Hooper

    5. Tomaz Selcan
    6.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
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  2. Tomaz Selcan

    Tomaz Selcan
    Premium Member

    1. Yes yes yes for any touring series. I don't know how the cars will be in different series, but wtcc is my favourite for now.

    2. I was huge fan of race driver grid, hundreds of hours with touring cars. I really liked simplicity of handling model and graphics were really good. When Grid 2 came out i was hopping for upgrade of Grid 1, well it was..in wrong way. I liked grid1 because i didn't need to plug my steering wheel in my pc to play it, it was best keyboard racing game ever and hope that grid autosport will be the same, just little less sliding :D I love sims, but i think that this kind of game is for relaxation and when you are to lazy to play anything serious.
    Soo i really hope that this game will be upgraded Grid 1, with more content and better online system and more fun drift handling.

    3. Almost every day after 6pm CET. Saturday is most critical but could probably make it.
     
  3. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Tomaz:

    Yes, it sounds like GRID2 was an epic fail, from those long time GRID1 players and from new guys, like myself, who are more SIM oriented. But GRID A/S sounds as if it may "straddle the line" as Codemasters is fond of saying, so a touring car series would be perfect to start, since there is really nothing going on here on the xbox 360 with touring cars and those sorts of series' don't require pit stops or have many penalty infractions. Perhaps a hybrid league of Assue, BTCC, WTCC, and Brazil?

    For those of us who want to branch off in to, say, IndyCars, we could do that too, interest permitting.

    Thanks doe your reply. I'll be sure to stay on top of things as they happen. I have pre-ordered the game myself.
     
  4. Loving those F3 clips, can't wait to try them out. Very much reminds me of the classic cars handling in F1 2013.
     
  5. What's the opinions on the cockpit views in those open wheeler clips? The out of focus look of the actual wheel in one of them is a new one on me. Overall I like how it appears but not quite sure about that out of focus idea.
     
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  6. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Generally either loved or hated, but I'm in between. I remember in Race Pro the Dash was not blurred out, but it was useless as far as instrumentation went, so I had to run the telemetry on the side anyway. But since it was, well, Race Pro, I didn't care. In fact, if Codemasters' theory is correct, your focus is really on the track, and your senses (mostly sound and sight, but also orientation) tell you when to shift and how fast you are going. No extra crap (DRS, KERS) to worry about. And from my real track experience, that's very true. You don't look at the gauges unless something goes wrong. lol.
     
  7. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Alex Zafro
    His YouTube site has some exclusive gameplay in it, which you have probably seen, but what is really exciting is how he describes the handing. (Obviously he is semi-promoting the game for Codemasters, but I'm sure they didn't tell him what to say). In another video, he said wheel users will be delighted, and compared the handling more to iRacing and rFactor than to GRID1 or GRID2. Give a listen around 2:10.
     
  8. Tomaz Selcan

    Tomaz Selcan
    Premium Member

    Hard to believe that handling is more like iRacing and rfactor...i hope not. I think that handling will be upgraded from grid 1. Grid 2 is total different story. I watch some of videos where AI is catching drift and it is very smiliar behaviour to grid 1. And i hope thats true, because i love grid 1 handling. It's easy, fun and not hard to master.
     
  9. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Yea, I don't think they made a direct comparison, but they were obviously gushing over the immersion and the noticeable swing toward SIM, even from GRID1. That seems to be the word.
     
  10. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    duplicate
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  11. I certainly am really looking forward to the release date of this one and that video was a nice little taster Robert. Not to hot on the corner cutting though it seems, both the AI and Alex himself cut the hell out of quite a lot of those corners :confused:

    My only concern with most of what I have seen so far is it's a bit Forza looking in quite a lot of ways and in particular in the shortness of the races. I enjoyed Forza in the spells I have played it but those silly little 3 lap races you have to do are not really my cup of tea and one of the reasons I never got into it that much. One of the reasons I love the F1, Race Pro and Nascar racing we do is the fact that you can cater the races to pretty much suit any preference. Hopefully ive missed something here and there is the facilty to increase the duration of the races.
     
  12. Tomaz Selcan

    Tomaz Selcan
    Premium Member

    Well there are going to be endurance races, 24 minutes of le mans and much more i think. I like grid 1 because of it's simplicity. You join the server and can almost immediently start racing, most of the times 3 laps which is enough to have fun, after 3 laps most of people crashed or you have an epic battle with someone.
    Btw, i just bought grid autosport today, only for 27€ which is nice, because i still belive that they robbed me for grid 2 and dlc's.
    After seeing how cars drifts and wtcc series, i was sold. :D I hope that we will have some fun races on PC like in grid 2.
     
  13. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Yes, luckily you have missed something. But it's a lot to digest I know. I'm just a bit obsessed because I know the potential of Codemasters if they want to make a great game (they can).

    Custom Cup. That's the place where you can match any car to any track and set not only the length of the race (up to 40 minutes or 20 laps X 5 individual races (so, for instance, we could have two 20 lap races, or similar, like they do in GP3 and Touring Car and never leave the lobby). In Codemasters' own words:
    Online Custom Cup
    Online Custom Cup is the game mode where you get to have your cake and eat it. Here, you can configure an Event to exactly the way you like it, and the rewards will fit the difficulty options you choose. In GRID Autosport, you can even make a Custom Cup pay out more than a Playlist event if you make it tough enough! Here’s a breakdown of the things you can configure in a Custom Cup:

    • Discipline – pick your favourite style of racing.
    • Vehicle Class – the type of vehicles you want to drive.
    • Race Type – the available Race Types will depend on what Discipline and Vehicles you’ve picked.
    • Number of Events – create a mini-championship up to five Events long.
    • AI – choose whether or not to add AI opponents to the session, which will fill any available slots on the grid. The difficulty of the AI can be changed as well.
    • Tracks – choose the track, route, lighting conditions and race length for each Event.
    • Upgrades, Tuning and Assists – can be disabled individually to level the playing field.
    • Manual Only – turn this on if you want everyone to use manual transmission.
    • Cockpit Cam Only – can be enabled for an ultra-hardcore experience.
    • Pre- and Post-race timers – can be made longer or shorter to suit your preferences.
    • Collisions – can be turned off if you don’t want vehicles to collide with each other.
    • Grid Order – provides a range of options for how you want the grid to be ordered at the start of each race.
    • Damage – can be set to Full or Visual Only. In Visual Only, your car will still crumple in a crash, but it won’t develop any mechanical defects.
    • Flashbacks – the number of Online Flashbacks that are allowed per race can be set here.
    You don't need to "own" the car, as you can race any car in the game (as a loaner) on any track. So, online playlists have been tweaked to include longer races, and will now feature the same vehicle class for consecutive events. The rules in these pre-made playlists are standardised, though players can change the number of assists used, and tune their vehicles.

    In other words, you can have long races in any car at any track, but if you want, say, the handling of a street car or the tire wear of an endurance car, you have to pick one of those car groups to get that.

    I think Endurance will be a popular option in any league since you have tire wear come in to play, you often race at night, the cars are fast and grippy, but still able to race close and trade paint, and the races care designed to be long (although you can make any race long and string "heats" of 0-20 laps together or 40 minute races back to back. No worries.
     
  14. Cheers Robert, the league play certainly sounds like it's completely customisable to most needs but are those same options also available offline? Most of the time will be spent offline so thats always where I focus my attention. I'm sure this has been mentioned somewhere but I can't seem to locate it this morning.
     
  15. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Yes, in fact, you can go to your own little testing session with any car on any track and run laps or race against A.I. or simply tune and test. The only thing I'm not sure whether you can do or not is save a specific tune for your car, but I'm sure if you own the car there would be some way to do this. In the meantime, you can test any car in any environment.
     
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  16. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Also, unlike GRID2, prior to each race, you can choose to have a certain number of minutes to practice and then run a three lap qualifying session. You can customize these as to whether or not to have them or how long the practice can be for each race.
     
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  17. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Rough sketch of what I've come up with for the Touring Car series. No Dates or real specifics other than cars, tracks, and series grouping.

    GRID Ultimate World Touring Car Series

    Sponsored by: RACE DEPARTMENT.COM

    FIA GT Series (Enduance Tier 1)
    Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG GT3
    McLaren 12C GT3
    Audi R8 LMS Ultra
    Aston Martin N24 V12 Zagato


    Japanese SUPER GT Series (Enduance Tier 2)
    Nissan 2008 (R25) GT-R
    Nismo GT500
    Honda HSV-010 GT


    Le Mans Prototype Series (Enduance Tier 3)
    Lola B12/80
    Mazda 787B


    British Touring Car Series (Touring Tier 1)
    Honda Civic Touring Car
    Ford Focus ST Touring Car
    Chevrolet Cruze Touring Car
    BMW 320 Touring Car


    DTM Series (Touring Tier 2)
    Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG (Cat B Special)
    Audi RS5 (Cat B Special)


    Australian V8 Supercars (Touring Tier 3)
    Ford Falcon FG
    Holden VF Commodore


    _______________________


    Tracks

    FIA GT Series (Enduance Tier 1)
    Yas Marina Circuit (night)
    Paris - Circuit de la Seine


    Japanese SUPER GT Series (Enduance Tier 2)
    Okutama
    Intercity Istanbul Park


    American Le Mans Series (Enduance Tier 3)
    Streets of Washington – GP Circuit
    Indianapolis Motor Speedway – GP Circuit


    British Touring Car Series (Touring Tier 1)
    Brands Hatch (night)
    Spa-Francorchamps


    DTM Series (Touring Tier 2)
    Hockenheimring
    Red Bull Ring


    Australian V8 Supercars (Touring Tier 3)
    Circuit of the Americas - National Circuit
    Mount Panorama
     
  18. William Wester

    William Wester
    Premium Member

    So where did you get it for 27€ ?
     
  19. Tomaz Selcan

    Tomaz Selcan
    Premium Member

  20. Rob

    Rob
    XBO: OctoberDusk06 Premium Member

    Discipline Focus // Open Wheel

    By Ben Walke @BenWalke · On June 4, 2014
    “Easy does it”, a phrase I often repeat to myself when I partake in a bit of Open Wheel racing, the thought that just a little too much throttle on the exit of the corner will cause the rear end to wriggle, squirm and potentially spin out is all too familiar. This is racing at its finest, where the optimal racing line and braking points are worth valuable tenths of a second.

    Unlike the Touring Car discipline where drivers aren’t afraid to rub a little paint now and then, Open Wheel is all about avoiding contact as the fragile nature of the cars mean only the faintest of touches is required to put a dent in your hopes of a podium.

    Slipstream is also more prominent within the Open Wheel discipline, making it a valuable tool in your arsenal as you look to progress up the field. As useful as it may be, you still have to be wary; dropping into the slipstream of the car ahead may give you an overtaking opportunity but your usual braking distance at a corner will have changed, get that wrong and it could be into the gravel trap, run off area, or worse.

    Other drivers can also use your slipstream, so while you may be out in front, the driver in second place may well be lining you up, and the next thing you know you’ll be giving up a place. It’s things like this that really makes Open Wheel a special discipline to race in.

    Open Wheel is precision racing at its very best.

    So what makes Open Wheel special?

    • Large grid sizes
    • The A.I. opt for clean racing lines
    • Cars of similar or pre-defined specification, usually single car class
    • Sports-tuned vehicles with lots of grip
    • Practice, Qualifying and Race format
    • Day time races
    [​IMG]

    So what about the cars?

    The Open Wheel discipline is home to some great racing vehicles and track day cars, let’s take a look:

    Dallara F312
    [​IMG]
    Lola B05/52
    [​IMG]
    Dallara IndyCar
    [​IMG]
    Catherham-Lol SP300R
    [​IMG]
    Ariel Atom 3.5
    [​IMG]
    KTM X-Bow R
    [​IMG]
    Ariel Atom 500 V8
    [​IMG]
    Caparo T1
    [​IMG]
    But how do they handle? Once again we catch up with our Wizard of a Car Handling Designer, Luke Stephenson who had this to say:

    “For raw acceleration and agility, nothing can compare to cars from the Open Wheel discipline. These are lightweight, stiffly sprung racing machines that will change direction faster than anything else. The Open Wheel discipline includes a couple of different kinds of car: first, cars such as the Ariel Atom, which are nippy, rear-engined and love to oversteer through the corners. Then there are the mid-engine Formula cars, with thick slick rear tyres and lots of downforce, providing incredible grip that encourages drivers to attack the limits with real confidence.

    Smoothness, precision and bravery will be rewarded in these cars; but with such high power to weight ratios and so much grip, drivers will need sharp reflexes to stay out of the gravel if they get it wrong”.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2014
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