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Featured F1: German GP Cut From 2015 Schedule

Discussion in 'Formula 1' started by Ben Stevens, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. Ben Stevens

    Ben Stevens

    For the first time in 60 years, 2015 will see Formula 1 go without a Grand Prix in Germany.

    GENEVA: The FIA's World Motor Sport Council today announced their decision to officially remove the German Grand Prix from the 2015 Formula 1 schedule.

    Tentatively scheduled to take place on July 19, contract negotiations between F1's commercial rights holder, Formula One Management (FOM), and German promoters were unable to find a solution to the licensing and ticketing problems that have jeopardised the profitability of the event in recent years.

    While scheduled to take place this year at the Nurburgring - per the agreement to annually alternate with the Hockenheimring - a spokesman for the circuit announced this week that the uncertainties resulting from the ongoing negotiations had made it no longer "economically viable" to host the Grand Prix, with such a short amount of time to prepare.

    Despite FOM CEO Bernie Ecclestone saying in January that he would look to return the race to its 2014 venue at Hockenheim, this alternative has also fallen through, as management for the track has similarly stated hosting the race on such short notice would have an adverse effect on the "quality of the event". The Hockenheimring will return to hosting duties in 2016, and again in 2018 to fulfill their 2009 contract.

    With the cancellation of the German GP, the 2015 F1 calendar returns to 19 races. There will now be a three-week break between the British Grand Prix on July 5, and the Hungarian Grand Prix on July 26.

    With a history of Grand Prix racing older than Formula 1 itself, 2015 will mark the first year with no German race since 1955.
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
    • Beer Beer x 2
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  2. Bernd Graf

    Bernd Graf
    Premium Member

    This is just a shame. Nico Rosberg is not going to be happy, and neither am I.
    • Agree Agree x 3
  3. stevem


    It's like watching a train wreck in slo-mo. What's next? No Monaco?
    • Agree Agree x 3
  4. Emerson Meyer

    Emerson Meyer
    Keep Fighting Premium Member

    F1 is getting better and better. Pfff
    • Agree Agree x 3
  5. JeffL

    Right on Brother, I hear ya, it's all good. Premium Member

    I guess they have to make room for the epic racing mecca and historically important, Las Vegas. ;)
    • Haha Haha x 3
  6. Is it really that hard to prepare a F1 event within 3-4 months ? The Hockenheimring
    management should just go ahead and say they don't want to lose any money.
    I don't get it, why not lower the ticket prices a bit. Travelling from another country
    to watch an F1 race live is very very costly.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Thomas Hinss

    Thomas Hinss
    Aussie Commentator and Writer Staff

    Not a good sign honestly, losing one of the longest standing and well known Grand Prix like the German GP is quite a loss to F1. Hopefully this isn't the start of a trend to continue in F1 but this has certainly been (in my view anyway) one of the most disappointing starts to a F1 season I've seen.

    However, there is a whole season ahead to improve things so hopefully it will get better with time :)
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. The Nürburgring management (who still have a contract for 2017) said that they need to know about that race sooner rather than later as they would have to start preparations and sales THIS december (for a race in 2017 mind you)... So I can understand the reluctance of the Hockenheim guys...
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Beer Beer x 1
  9. Much as I hate seeing the loss of ANY Grand Prix, I still say it starts at the top and filters down.
    In the past I'd generally blame the promoters of such events for giving less than optimal conditions for attendance....high prices etc...
    It became apparent how little (on the grand scale) those guys actually made... after the 'top dogs' got finished with their 'money grab'.
    I don't blame them one bit.
    Maybe other venues should follow suit and send the 'dogs' a message.
    • Agree Agree x 2
  10. I believe this insane, selling tickets 2 years in advance. Everyone is booking
    seats 3-6 months in advance or a year earlier. That just goes to tell you
    how absurd the prices are.,if they were lower the place would be fully booked within a month.
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
    • Agree Agree x 2
  11. James Cook

    James Cook
    Marcas fan

    F1 is dying on its arse.
    • Agree Agree x 5
  12. F1 fan, but this year looks set to be the dullest year in f1 for a long time.
    It's a two-horse race, no competition at all.
    Enjoyed some of last year racing, but not really bothered about watching the races this year.
    red bull might well pull out soon too.
  13. Well done bernie. Killing off slowly all the races that made F1
  14. I personally don't care about the title of the race. The crowd turned it's back on the GP when there were so many empty seats last year.

    And take a look at the main grandstand, in the first laps of last years race.

    When things don't work out just move forward.
  15. Bernies crazy fees force tracks to charge crazy prices. thats my problem
    • Agree Agree x 2
  16. I agree on that. My problem is that no one cared when the Indian or the Korean GP stopped, but with Germany there is too much talk.
  17. James Cook

    James Cook
    Marcas fan

    Those countries have little F1 culture or history. That's why no one cared.
    • Agree Agree x 2
  18. JeffL

    Right on Brother, I hear ya, it's all good. Premium Member

    As an American I can't even imagine F1 without a German race, I guess just like everything else it's all about the money.:poop:
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. Didn't France have F1 culture? I certainly haven't missed it much.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. James Cook

    James Cook
    Marcas fan

    That's your opinion. I miss the French GP.

    France should have a GP as much as Britain, Germany and Italy because it has always been a major contributor of drivers, engines and teams. It has the F1 culture.

    And no, Monaco doesn't count as the unofficial French GP.
    • Agree Agree x 2