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Braking / gear shifting / releasing brake / timing throttle

Discussion in 'rFactor 2' started by racingenthusiast, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. racingenthusiast

    racingenthusiast

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    Need some help with these things that I mentioned on the tittle. I race GT3 cars.

    Braking: Is it better to brake in a straight line / or should I be braking into the corner ie trail braking?

    Gear shifting: Should I shift down the gears in the straight line before I enter the corner or is it ok to shift down whilst turning?

    Releasing the brake: I have problems with this because I have cheap pedals, usually I just let go of the brake completely when my cars slowed down enough, should I be easing off the brake?

    Throttle: When exiting corners I find it hard to time the throttle any tips?

    Thanks guys any help, tips or inputs is much appreciated !
     
  2. greggail

    greggail

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    In my experience -
    Brake first - don't brake and downshift together right away. Brake to let the car set, then downshift (if that makes sense).
    Leave final downshift until close to corner entry, don't get it all done too fast.
    Mario Andretti said one of the last things he learned was how to let OFF the brake. Ease off, if possible, to keep the car from unsettling.
    If you get a rhythm built up you should be back on the throttle (not necessarily full throttle) almost instantly after letting off the brake. NOT - brake, let off brake, pause, throttle. If that's too soon for the throttle, then you're getting your braking finished too soon.

    The steps should be (according to me), assuming 2 downshifts - Brake (continue braking throughout), continue braking and downshift, about halfway between first downshift and corner continue braking and downshift, just before corner entry continue braking and downshift, ease off brake and start applying throttle, throttle up. It should provide a nice smooth balance, except for the initial brake application. If you have time to watch your tach, make your downshifts when the revs hit your peak torque rpm instead, otherwise use the preceding distance estimate.

    If driving a rear engine Porsche you really need to remember 'slow in, fast out'. Get your braking done a little earlier and start accelerating a little sooner. Tail happy can drive you crazy.

    Disclaimers - Your mileage may vary and everyone has an opinion so there may not be a consensus on this.

    If you can get the 'off brake and back onto throttle' transition down you will dramatically drop your corner times. Once you do it right and feel it, you'll know what you're looking for. It's like a revelation (unless you're already doing it).
     
  3. racingenthusiast

    racingenthusiast

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    Thanks mate it is very hard for me to get it right because I have cheap pedals but I will be purchasing fanatec v3 pedals soon.

    Another question I have is when I am approaching a corner at max speed and I need to brake should I be doing this:

    Easing onto it // then FULL FORCE // then when slowed enough release full force but still stay on peddle until near apex, then off and onto gas? - Does that sound right? :)
     
  4. greggail

    greggail

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    Fanatec pedals will give a much better feel.

    IMO

    Think about what the car is doing. You don't want it bouncing up or down or side to side. If you cram on the brakes FULL FORCE the front end compresses BUT it stays compressed so you're o.k. If you let off the brakes all at once the front end rebounds and then has to settle - not good. That's why you want a measured release. IF you have your brake balance and brake pressure set so that the car is stable and not locking a wheel under hard braking, go for it. Remember, the front is compressing but the rear is getting light and may get squirrely. I'm not good enough to modulate my braking consistently so I get my brake balance set then back off on the brake pressure so that I can just barely lock a front wheel (the MOTEC analyzer add-on is really good for working this out), then I can brake full force.

    IRL there are reasons for easing into braking, then full force, due to needing to get some temperature in the brakes to keep them from grabbing or to make the full force braking effects consistent. Also in the older days it was advisable to put a little heat in the discs to keep them from developing cracks due to rapid heating if they had cooled down at the end of a long straight. AFAIK there aren't any sims that model either of these issues yet, so you can cheat there.

    >>then when slowed enough release full force but still stay on peddle until near apex, then off and onto gas? - Does that sound right?<<

    Yep. You just don't want the car to have to deal with any sudden movement during that time. If you haven't been able to do it before, when you get it right you'll go 'Oh my gosh, THAT'S how I'm suppose to do it!' ...and then you have to try and do it every time.
     
  5. racingenthusiast

    racingenthusiast

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    Thanks man been practicing for hours now still can not nail the braking, atm I am :/ lapping spa at 2:23's when I should be doing 2:17 lol :(
     
  6. thepharcyde

    thepharcyde

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    Depends car and spa version?